In the news - Ban violent video games, urge MPs

MPs have made a fresh call to ban the sale of violent video games after it was revealed that the Norwegian mass-murderer Anders Breivik considered the popular game Call of Duty “training”.

In the news

Ban violent video games, urge MPs


MPs have made a fresh call to ban the sale of violent video games after it was revealed that the Norwegian mass-murderer Anders Breivik considered the popular game Call of Duty “training”. Keith Vaz, Labour MP and chair of the Home Affairs Select Committee, has sponsored an Early Day Motion that asks the government to “provide for closer scrutiny of aggressive first-person shooter video games”.

The government has already announced stricter restrictions on the sale of violent games; any retailer found to have sold games rated as 12, 15 or 18 to anyone under those ages will now receive up to six months in prison, as well as a £5,000 fine. However the acknowledgment by Breivik, who has admitted to killing 77 people in July 2011, that he used violent games to “develop target acquisition” has led to renewed concern that more restrictions are needed on the sale of such items.



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