In the news - Hard-working teachers

Eight out of 10 teachers are concerned about the effect that the “hidden hours” spent working behind the scenes are having on their health.

Research conducted for TES found that over two-thirds of the primary and secondary school teachers surveyed had sacrificed at least one night’s sleep over the past three months in order to complete all their tasks.

In the news: Teaching Resources - 15 June

Hard-working teachers


Eight out of 10 teachers are concerned about the effect that the “hidden hours” spent working behind the scenes are having on their health. Research conducted for TES found that over two-thirds of the primary and secondary school teachers surveyed had sacrificed at least one night’s sleep over the past three months in order to complete all their tasks.

The report also showed that, on average, the number of hours teachers spend working now far outstrips those worked by many of their professional peers. Even taking into account school holidays, the study found that teachers spend an average of 48.3 hours per week. In contrast, figures from the Office of National Statistics show that advertising and PR directors spend an average of 42.2 hours in the office, while an architect’s typical working week runs to only 33.7 hours.

Over three-quarters of the 1,600 teachers surveyed claimed that they spent their Sunday afternoons and evenings working on lesson plans for the following week, and over half said that they were worried about the toll that the amount of time spent on work was having on their personal life. Writing in TES in March, regular columnist Ann Thrope (Ms) describes her own battle finding a work/life balance with the constantly increasing pressures of the teaching profession. “I ping awake at 5am and immediately think about work. Within a few minutes my heart thunders into life and I face a stampeding herd of my own inadequacies. I’m overwhelmed by all the things I’ve failed to achieve, and within seconds I’m drowning in seas of unmarked books, unmet targets and unfinished schemes of work,” she writes.

“I try clutching at a passing branch that has “you’re still a good mother” scratched on its bark. Then I remember that my son’s blazer is covered in yoghurt and that he missed out on a school trip because I didn’t return the permission slip. And suddenly the black clouds descend.”





Related resources


TES Collections: need help with planning your next lesson?

  • We’ve gathered together some collections of topical resources.

Practical support for managing your mental health

  • Find out where you can turn for practical and emotional support and advice, as well as discovering TES resources and articles on mental health and wellbeing.

Top ten teaching frustrations

  • This ebook lists one blogger’s view on the things they feel are holding teachers back.

Scourge-a-Gogue

  • A humorous approach to the work/life balance of teachers makes this resource a must-have in the staffroom.

Teacher suicide rates soar – dealing with stress

  • This resource collects together a number of documents on the issue of suicide within the teaching profession.

How many hours?

  • Radio discussion about the hours teachers work from LBC.93 FM.


Further news resources


First News front page

  • Help your pupils understand the features of the front page of a newspaper.

Write all about it

  • Get students creating their own news report with this step-by-step guide

What is the News?

  • A sociological and media perspective on what makes an event 'newsworthy'.

On the box

  • Help pupils to write their own TV news broadcast with this handy PowerPoint.

Structuring stories

  • A scheme of work to help students structure news stories.

In the news this week


Internet trolls who post abusive and defamatory messages about others may soon have fewer bridges to hide under if new proposals by the government are passed.

A rift has opened between church and state after the Church of England warned that introducing gay marriage may force the church out of conducting marriages for the state.

The European Championships kicked off last week with controversy over politics and racism threatening to overshadow football at the tournament being co-hosted by Ukraine and Poland.

Footballer Rio Ferdinand’s continued exclusion from England’s Euro 2012 led football anti-racism organisation Kick It Out to question whether manager Roy Hodgson decision should be condemned.