Today's news, tomorrow's lesson - 4 December - Great-grand news for Queen as royal pregnancy announced

After months of feverish speculation, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have announced that a new royal baby is on the way - one that will become the third in line to the throne.


Today's news, tomorrow's lesson - 4 December

Great-grand news for Queen as royal pregnancy announced


After months of feverish speculation, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have announced that a new royal baby is on the way – one that will become the third in line to the throne.

News that the duchess was expecting her first child came Monday afternoon after she was admitted to the King Edward VII hospital in central London suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum – an acute form of morning sickness that affects around 3 in 1000 pregnant women.

It is understood that she is in the very early stages of pregnancy – less than 12 weeks – but that the couple made the “difficult” decision to announce it publicly owing to fears that the duchess’s hospitalisation would fuel concerns for her health.

St James's Palace said members of both families were "delighted with the news". The Queen, Prince Charles and Prince Harry were told the news only an hour before it was released (Prince Harry in an email as he is currently serving with the Army in Afghanistan).

The new arrival will be the third great-grandchild welcomed into the royal family by the Queen. It will be the first time that a great-grandchild in direct succession to the throne has been born during the reign of a serving monarch since the birth of Edward VIII in 1894.

The baby will overtake Prince Harry to become third in line to the throne after Prince Charles and Prince William and, in a break with centuries of tradition, this will happen regardless of whether the child is a boy or a girl. Last October, Commonwealth leaders agreed to change the succession laws so that the daughter of any future British monarch will have the same right to the throne as a son.

The new baby will one day be the head of the armed forces, supreme governor of the Church of England and head of state in 15 Commonwealth countries.


Questions for discussion


General Discussion

  • Why do you think it has taken so long for succession laws to be changed to give equal rights to male and female heirs?
  • Do we still need a royal family? Is the monarchy outdated, or do they still have something to contribute?
  • The British royal family are popular both in the UK and in other countries. Why do you think people are interested in them?
  • Royal babies are born in the public eye. How do you think they might be affected by this? Will their childhood be very different to your own?

Related resources


Who are the Royal Family?

  • A super PowerPoint containing facts on the Royal Family – great for starting a discussion.

The Royal Family Marriage of William and Kate

  • An activity looking at the history of royal marriages, combining the Royal Family tree and the marriage of William and Kate.

Royal Family Tree

  • A lovely diagram of the Royal Family tree.


Queen or King for the day

  • Ask your pupils to write what they would do if they were Queen or King for the day with these worksheet activities.


Further news resources


First News front page

  • Help your pupils understand the features of the front page of a newspaper.

Write all about it

  • Get students creating their own news report with this step-by-step guide.

What is the News?

  • A sociological and media perspective on what makes an event 'newsworthy'.

On the box

  • Help pupils to write their own TV news broadcast with this handy PowerPoint.

Structuring stories

  • A scheme of work to help students structure news stories.

In the news this week


The UK government’s move to ban the sale of cheap alcohol to try to cut binge drinking and associated health risks is the latest in a long line of attempts to do something about Britain’s love affair with the bottle.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is launching a blueprint for the eradication of Aids across the globe, on the eve of World Aids Day 2013.

The British Press is in need of an independent regulatory body, today’s much anticipated Leveson report has suggested.

The publication of Lord Leveson’s report on improving regulation of newspapers and journalism is already big news.



In the news archive index