Progression in Writing: Punctuation 7-11 Years

This framework can be used to assess the progress of children between the ages of seven and eleven who are learning to write. Useful, high-quality teaching resources have been matched to a number of key statements, which provide a guide for measuring pupils’ abilities in using punctuation.

 

Step 3a: Writing is made up of straightforward sentences usually demarcated accurately with full stops, capital letters, question and exclamation marks

E.g. Johnny, don’t touch that cake! Would you prefer this one?

VCOP resource bank

  • Various resources, including quickfire activities, games and links.

Punctuation cards

  • Simple flashcards with the basic punctuation marks on them.

Add punctuation marks to improve the sentences

  • A set of sentences which need full stops, commas, question marks, exclamation marks and speech marks.

Amazing apostrophes

  • Do you know when and where to use an apostrophe?

Using apostrophes

  • Activities to help practise using apostrophes.

Apostrophes differentiated worksheets

  • Worksheets about The Simpsons to help students use apostrophes.

PowerPoint on speech

  • This gives examples of how to punctuate speech.

Punctuation police

  • Children who finish their work become ‘Punctuation Police’ and check the work of others.

Full stop ideas and full stop spotter badges

  • Ideas to encourage children to check their work for full stops. Includes a fun set of badges.

Punctuation fans

  • Use in conjunction with the punctuation pyramid or as a standalone resource during whole class teaching.


Step 3b: Writing may include some limited use of speech punctuation

E.g. “I have won a holiday to Disney World,” said Fred

Speech marks

  • A PowerPoint explaining speech bubbles and speech marks

Add punctuation marks to improve the sentences

  • A set of sentences which need full stops, commas, question marks, exclamation marks and speech marks.

Speech marks

  • A PowerPoint on turning speech bubbles into written speech.

Everyday punctuation

  • This looks at the most common punctuation marks.

Speech marks

  • An animated and interactive PowerPoint that introduces speech marks using speech bubbles as a starting point.

Powerpoint on speech

  • This gives examples of how to punctuate speech.

The Twits speech marks (Roald Dahl)

  • Transfer what the Twits and other characters are saying from speech bubbles into correctly punctuated sentences.


Step 4a: Sentences are demarcated accurately throughout the text, including the use of question marks

E.g. Did you see the accident? The car was slowing down when the bike bumped into it from behind

Add punctuation marks to improve the sentences

  • A set of sentences which need full stops, commas, question marks, exclamation marks and speech marks.

Everyday punctuation

  • This looks at the most common punctuation marks.

Using apostrophes

  • Activities to help practise using apostrophes.

Punctuation

  • This recaps how to use punctuation in a sentence correctly, looking specifically at questions, statements, capital letters and apostrophes.

Apostrophes differentiated worksheets

  • Worksheets about The Simpsons to help students use apostrophes.

PowerPoint on speech

  • This gives examples of how to punctuate speech.

Punctuation police

  • Children who finish their work become ‘Punctuation Police’ and check the work of others.

Punctuation traffic lights

  • How to progress to higher levels using punctuation.

Full stop ideas and full stop spotter badges

  • Ideas to encourage children to check their work for full stops. Includes a fun set of badges.


Step 4b: Speech marks are generally used accurately, with some other speech punctuation used to denote speech

E.g. “What is the matter with your hand?” asked Mark

Identifying and inserting speech marks

  • Pupils who have difficulty using speech marks are asked to highlight the spoken words within the sentence.

Punctuation

  • This recaps how to use punctuation in a sentence correctly, looking specifically at questions, statements, capital letters and apostrophes.

Direct and reported speech

  • An activity to help students punctuate direct and reported speech.

Speech marks

  • An animated and interactive PowerPoint that introduces speech marks using speech bubbles as a starting point.

PowerPoint on speech

  • This gives examples of how to punctuate speech.

Direct to reported speech

  • This shows the number of steps required to change direct speech to reported.

Punctuation traffic lights

  • How to progress to higher levels using punctuation.


Step 4c: Commas are used in lists and occasionally to mark clauses, although not always accurately

E.g. The game was over, but the crowd refused to leave

Punctuation

  • This recaps how to use some punctuation in a sentence correctly, looking specifically at questions and statements, capital letters and apostrophes.

Punctuation traffic lights

  • How to progress to higher levels using punctuation..


Step 5a: The writer is able to use the full range of punctuation accurately to demarcate sentences, including speech punctuation

E.g. “I was able,” she answered, “to complete the assignment.”

Punctuation ‘follow me’ loop card game/quiz

  • Each level is colour-coded for three levels of difficulty, and offers examples that can be used as ‘hints’.

Sentence games

  • Games to improve sentence construction, which cover connectives, openers and punctuation.

Identifying and inserting speech marks

  • Pupils who have difficulty using speech marks are asked to highlight the spoken words within the sentence.

Punctuation

  • This recaps how to use punctuation in a sentence correctly, looking specifically at questions, statements, capital letters and apostrophes.

Direct and reported speech

  • An activity to help students punctuate direct and reported speech.

Speech marks

  • An animated and interactive powerpoint that introduces speech marks using speech bubbles as a starting point.

Direct to reported speech

  • This shows the number of steps required to change direct speech to reported.

Punctuation traffic lights

  • How to progress to higher levels using punctuation.


Progression in Writing: Punctuation 5-7 Years

Progression in Writing: Sentence Structure 5-7 Years

Progression in Writing: Sentence Structure 7-11 Years


Resources for Writing Progression Home