Teachers from abroad looking for jobs in England

TheoGriff
25th March 2014 at 00:00

Teachers from abroad looking for jobs in England

 

 

Many teachers in other countries think that they would like to come and teach here in the UK.  But it’s often not as easy as you may think for you to get a job as a teacher over here, I’m afraid. 

 

There are often shortage subjects, in certain areas of the country, which means that teachers from abroad are very much welcomed.  But getting a teaching post in England and Wales is not necessarily going to be easy for you. I’m going to set out the issues, so that you have a good understanding of what problems you may face.  It is not impossible, some people do manage it, but it is not always easy.  So read on from here!

 

Language

 

Obviously, in order to teach here you need to have high levels of proficiency in written and spoken English to allow effective communication with pupils, colleagues and parents.  But what may seem like a good level in your home country may not meet our requirements here, which is, of course, near-native fluency and in particular the ability to write correctly (grammar and spelling) on the whiteboard for pupils, and in any reports or letters that you draft.  Your accent too – both pronunciation and intonation - should be very good, so that you are understood immediately by your pupils. 

Teachers coming from countries where English is the official or co-official language may think that they couldn’t possibly have a problem with their level of English, but sometimes they  have a problem with pronunciation or intonation that renders comprehension tricky for both colleagues and pupils.  Since effective communication is essential, this could be a barrier to employment that might come out in an interview.

 

Right to reside and work in the United Kingdom

 

This is a prerequisite for any employment in the United Kingdom. 

If you are a citizen of a European Union country, you probably have the right to come and work in the UK. This is certainly true for those countries that have been in the EU for a long time; newer member countries may be subject to some restrictions.  Check locally with your British Embassy or Consulate. 

Citizens of all other countries should enquire in their own country what restrictions there may be on them coming to work in the UK; we cannot give you any advice on this.

 

Qualifications to teach - QTS

 

In order to teach in a maintained school in England and Wales you need Qualified Teacher Status – QTS.  To teach in Scotland or Northern Ireland you need a similar qualification.  There are some schools (Independent Schools, Free Schools and Academies) where QTS is not a legal requirement.  However nearly all of them also require all teachers to have this.  If you are employed without QTS, you will usually be paid a much lower salary, and can normally only be employed on a temporary basis.

 

QTS for European Economic Area nationals

 

Teachers from the EEA who are qualified to teach in their own country can nearly always obtain QTS by automatic recognition of their national qualification, without further training.  You have to apply to obtain this.

Gaining QTS does not, however, give you the right to reside and work in the UK; this is a separate requirement; we cannot give you any advice on this.

See here for further details - click:

QTS for EEA

 

QTS for teachers from US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand

 

Teachers from the above countries who are qualified to teach in their own country can nearly always obtain QTS by automatic recognition of their national qualification, without further training.  You must also have done any probationary year or similar that is required in your state.  You have to apply to obtain this.

Gaining QTS does not, however, give you the right to reside and work in the UK; this is a separate requirement; we cannot give you any advice on this.

 See here for further details - click:

QTS for above countries

 

QTS for teachers from all other countries

 

If you are a qualified and experienced teacher from another country, you may be able to gain QTS through the Assessment Only (AO) route.  You can get details of this below.

See here for further details - click

QTS AO

 

If you do not have QTS, you may be employed by a school but it will probably be on a much lower salary, and normally only as a temporary teacher for up to four years (in Wales, two years).

 

QTS - warning

 

Teachers from countries abroad who gain QTS through automatic recognition of their foreign qualification should heed this warning.

 

Having QTS will not guarantee you a job in a school in the UK.   

 

You are legally qualified, but not necessarily suitable.  Just being legally qualified under EU rules etc, and having experience abroad in a foreign education system does NOT necessarily make you an appropriate candidate for a job here, I'm afraid.

Because you have not been trained in the UK, you probably know little or nothing about the three-part or four-part lesson, of L.O.s and plenaries, of differentiation for kinetic learning, of AfL. You don’t understand  PM, or  CPD.  You could not mark mock SATs, GCSEs or A-levels, you most probably could not easily even TEACH SATs, GCSEs or A-levels. You do not know what Ofsted's requirements are.  You may not even understand exactly what Ofsted is, and why its requirements are paramount for a Head.

What do all these abbreviations mean?  Even if we told you what they stood for, that wouldn’t help you understand what they mean for a teacher.  This is a major problem if you are coming from abroad.

 

Familiarity with the National Curriculum and state qualifications

A major issue, therefore, is your lack of experience in the UK and therefore your lack of familiarity with the National Curriculum, and from there, a probable inability to devise a learning programme for your pupils.

Because in the UK, teachers plan and devise the learning programme for each class.

Here, unlike many countries, teachers do not follow a classbook (perhaps with an associated activity book) for all their lessons. Teachers are expected to plan, to invent, their own lessons, every lesson, bearing in mind a whole number of factors. They spend hours and hours devising learning activities and strictly planned lessons. They are often required to hand in their planning to the HoD, AHT or DHT for checking beforehand.  There are bookshelves full of books on how to do this, because it is very complicated.  

And you need to do it for every lesson, because you could be asked at any moment to show your planning file to SLT (who are SLT?).  Or with half a day's notice, Ofsted could ring up on Wednesday lunch time and be observing the school and its teachers Thursday and Friday.  That means you.

 

Here is an example of what teachers are expected to plan and do in their lessons.  Every day.  Every lesson.

 

 

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In order to do all this easily, teachers in the UK really need UK training.  I am adding at the end a lesson plan template which explains things that need to be done.

Just having QTS makes you legally able to teach, (because, for example,  the EU says we must give this to EU nationals) but does not make you actually able to teach according to UK requirements.

 

Another problem might be that you are applying for a job from abroad

 

If you are still abroad at present, this is an additional problem, because a school will require you to come for an interview (at your own expense normally) where you have to do an observed lesson according to UK teaching criteria, and you won't be easily available for this.  But this is very much a minor point compared to the lack of familiarity with the N.C and the requirements here, which would make it extremely difficult for you to give a lesson of an appropriate type and standard, even if you did hop on a plane for the interview.

 

So what can you do?

All this is very depressing.  Without UK experience, basically, you will find it very difficult to get a job. But without a job, you cannot get UK experience! Catch 22.

Your best chance is if you have the right to reside and work in the UK, and are trained and qualified in your own country, to apply for automatic recognition of QTS (where possible) and get yourself on the books of a Supply Agency to see if with some short-term assignments in schools you can begin to build up experience here in the UK.  This will give you much-valued experience and allow you then to show schools, when you apply for a permanent post, that you are familiar with the National Curriculum, with the Teachers' Standards, with the examinations system, and thus are a suitable candidate for a job in their school.

 

 

 

 Template for a lesson plan

 

Based on the template contributed to TES Resources by JAKemp28

 

https://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Observed-Lesson-Plan-Template-6367293/

 

The formatting has not transferred well; it is best to use the link above to see the plan properly.

Date: ?/?/?

Lesson plan

Subject:  ?     Year Groups: ?      No. of Children: ?           Range of levels: ?

Learning objective

Specific and skill based, differentiated if possible

.

How will the lesson achieve this?

Be specific either about what skill they will develop or need to apply and how that will meet the learning objective.

How will I know they have achieved this and have made good progress?

Whatever method of assessment you use there should be numerous opportunities throughout the lesson to assess progress. It is very important that this takes place both during the starter and the plenary. This should also include both self assessment and an opportunity for you to assess their progress.

What are my expected outcomes?

Must

Example

Be able to find fractions of amounts by dividing the amount by the denominator e.g.

Find 1/10 of 40 by dividing 40 by 10.

Should

Example

Be able to find fractions of amounts by dividing the amount by the denominator then multiplying by the numerator to find the desired fraction

e.g.

Find 4/10 of 40 by dividing 40 by 10 and then multiplying by 4.

Could

Example

Be able to find fractions of amounts by dividing the amount by the denominator then multiplying by the numerator to find the desired fraction and relate to equivalent percentages

e.g.

Find 4/10 of 40 by dividing 40 by 10 and then multiplying by 4. Then recognise that this gives them 40% of 40.

 

Names

(Add names after lesson)

Names

(Add names after lesson)

Names

(Add names after lesson)

Where have we been?

A brief outline of what content has been covered and what skills have been acquired to reach the current lesson. If this lesson falls at the start of a sequence you will have to focus on the skills the children have already acquired rather than coverage.  ALWAYS refer to previous learning at the start of the lesson.

Where are we going?

A brief outline of what content you will cover after this lesson and what skills you would like the children to acquire next. If this lesson falls at the end of a sequence you can mention the learning developed across the whole unit. ALWAYS make it clear how this lesson will help the children to progress on to future lessons.

 

What specific needs do I need to be aware of?

Mention both any additional requirements due to SEN and learning related requirements. Indentify children who have you feel might struggle and those who will need more of a challenge. How will you meet their needs? How will you differentiate for them? What possible misconceptions might certain children have? This is a chance to demonstrate how well you know your class.

I always highlight information for LSA’s as well as any activity or role I would like them to take.

Key Vocabulary: related to the learning objective.

Interactive

Collaborative

Self assessment

 

 

Best wishes 

 

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