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Literacy for SEN, Early Years, Primary, Reception, Preschoolers

Literacy for SEN, Early Years, Primary, Reception, Preschoolers

Ideal for NQT a literacy bundle that has a range of worksheets for SEN, Early Years, Reception, Primary and Preschoolers. Includes differentiated worksheets for students who are at the pre-writing stage, up to writing independently. Has 6 Jolly Phonics style worksheets for basic phonics (s,a,t,p,i,n). Includes comprehension from nursery rhymes to commenting on items in photos. With the speaking, listening and writing we ask carers to email or let us know a couple of things that their child did at the weekend, so that we are able to prompt children or get other children to ask appropriate questions. We also check children's listening by asking 'Who went shopping, who visited family, who was ill, who walked the dog, where did they go, what did they buy' etc. before the students write what they did with help, by copying from a white board or working independently.
smidgealot
Behavioural Incident Report with Functional Analysis of Behaviour

Behavioural Incident Report with Functional Analysis of Behaviour

This document guides staff though a reflective and analytical process when an individual has displayed behaviour perceived to be challenging. It seeks to support staff in exploring the reasons ‘challenging behaviour’ occurs and to promote reflective practice around education and support. The aim is to assist staff in understanding and meeting an individual’s needs so that challenging behaviour reduces. Those completing the process should consider the following key questions throughout the process: • Was the individual seeking to escape a situation they were not ‘ready for’? • Were the supposed consequences something they were actually seeking? e.g. Individual is put in ‘isolation’ but this may be relief to them if they are feeling social overwhelmed. Could this lead to the behaviour being repeated? • Can more be done to teach coping, assertiveness and communication strategies to replace the challenging behaviour? • Do staff consistently demonstrate a good understanding of an individual’s needs? • Are opportunities to share good inclusive practice maximised?
SpectrumSavvy
Planting a Rainbow - A Sensory Story for Spring / Summer

Planting a Rainbow - A Sensory Story for Spring / Summer

Planting a Rainbow is a story by Lois Elhert about planting bulbs which grow into flowers of all different colours. I am using it as part of our rainbow theme in school. The story comes with the words and a suggested list of sensory props to use alongside the story. This story is ideal for anyone working with PMLD, visually impaired and complex needs students.
prestkat
Meltdown Metacognition

Meltdown Metacognition

Meltdown Metacognition This is a 7 page visual guide to help students to think cognitively through meltdowns. Learning Objectives are: To understand the catalysts for meltdowns To apply this understanding to create a meltdown plan (Cool Plan cards) Includes: 5 pages of visual workbook for students, fully illustrated 7 metacognitive questions (proven to help students develop new pathways into thinking) 1 page facilitator notes 1 page of Catalyst and Cool plan cards to cut out Why metacognition? The best definition I have seen is... '...teaching one’s brain to control the thought processes it has for the purpose of directing it towards the management of their own learning...' Taken from: http://www.greatmathsteachingideas.com/2013/07/23/metacognition-thoughts-on-teaching-mathematical-problem-solving-skills/
morgsalisbury
Tacos: Visual Recipe and supplementary resources.

Tacos: Visual Recipe and supplementary resources.

Tacos: Visual Recipe and supplementary resources. This notebook is designed for the students to use it as a visual sequence when cooking. They have all the ingredients and utensils needed and then an easy to follow recipe. It has an inbuilt shopping activity so that the cooking can be integrated into a shopping program. Within the shopping part which encourages literacy skills, students can choose what they will buy and then make their own shopping list by either writing it or sticking the associated visual onto their shopping list. There are also some integrated literacy skills to match the ingredients as well as some writing sheets. There is an interactive pairs game matching the ingredients. Worksheets accompany the notebook as well as a copy of the visual recipe, which can be printed and laminated for use in the kitchen This recipe makes vegetarian tacos, you can always replace the kidney beans with minced beef.
pearp
Using numbers in the everyday world.

Using numbers in the everyday world.

Using numbers in the everyday world. This includes worksheets and interactive whiteboard resource. To teach the mathematical concepts of numeration in the everyday world. It is a hands on activity, which has an in-built comprehension section. It has worksheets which can be printed out, laminated and used to reinforce the learning. It was developed for special needs students, and is suitable for younger mainstream students. The resources teach numeration in the everyday world when using a mobile phone, using PayPass / contact less paying systems and travelling on bus. The bus resource is for NSW but can easily be adapted for wherever you live. There is a work sheet for reinforcement of learning regarding the numerals 0 - 9
pearp
SEN Focus Work Mat with reward system

SEN Focus Work Mat with reward system

Place 3 cubes on each coloured square with each cube resembling an activity or piece of work that the child must complete (this could be as simple as question 1, question 2 and question 3 on a work sheet). Once the child completes each step they can remove a cube, when all cubes are removed and the task is complete the child can choose a reward. These can be edited to match the child's interests. Great for use with SEN or children who struggle to stay focused and on task.
Sophienicholson27
Returning to school after encephalitis. Guidance for school staff

Returning to school after encephalitis. Guidance for school staff

The long-term prognosis for children after encephalitis varies considerably. In some instances, children come through the illness with little or no consequences. In others, children have considerable life-long difficulties or appear to have recovered well, but their future learning and personal development are affected. Returning to school after encephalitis is a very important step in the child’s recovery from encephalitis, in terms of both their social and educational reintegration. However, sometimes returning to school is a continuous battle to get the right services for the child at the right time. This guidance aims to help school staff understand that encephalitis changes lives and that their support is essential in helping the child and their family have an enjoyable and successful return to school. The guidance covers information about encephalitis and the difficulties that may result from it. Various specific needs are described individually for clarity but of course their combined effect must be considered with care. There is also advice about how school staff can plan and implement the provision needed to meet the child’s needs. We hope that this guidance is useful, but schools will also require specific and detailed information about the child that is their concern. Teachers need to take great care and consideration in helping fellow pupils understand the child’s needs so the risk of bullying and social isolation is minimised. In all circumstances, deciding how best to meet the needs of a child with acquired brain injury (ABI) is often complex and demanding—information and decision-making need to be very explicit, evaluated and passed on with care. A summary of this guidance (Returning to school after encephalitis. Guidance for school staff. A summary) is also available on our website or can be requested from our office (mail@encephalitis.info or 01653699599). With the ever increasing workload in school, we understand that teachers have limited time, therefore such summary guidance can be useful for an overview on encephalitis and its impact on learning before the more in depth knowledge discussed in the full guidance is required.
alina14