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Assembly: B is for Being Yourself

Assembly: B is for Being Yourself

It is good to have goals and dreams in life and to work towards them. We also need to learn to accept ourselves for who we are. This assembly story is about someone who learns that very lesson. This comprehensive pack includes: A fully scripted assembly including an introduction and reflection with key questions throughout, A presentation (PDF) complete with engaging images, A set of Key Word cards to enhance understanding, A reward certificate. Themes explored include: goals, ambitions, lessons, responsible, pride, understanding, acceptance.
MySchoolAssembly
Aesop's Fables:  ´The Lion and the Hare´ (Week 8/12)

Aesop's Fables: ´The Lion and the Hare´ (Week 8/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Aesop's Fables:  ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ (Week 7/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ (Week 7/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Aesop's Fables:  ‘Crow and the Swan’  (Week 6/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘Crow and the Swan’ (Week 6/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Aesop's Fables: ‘Who will Bell the Cat?’ (wk 5/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘Who will Bell the Cat?’ (wk 5/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Easter - exploring the meaning through questions.

Easter - exploring the meaning through questions.

Use for year 7 RE. This lesson takes a big picture look at Easter to explore not only student’s knowledge but assess their understanding about what Easter is, and has become in the modern world. It uses episodes from the Miracle Maker film to explore the key events of holy week up to the crucifixion and encourages higher level thinking and questioning using a question matrix. This will need printing out prior to the lesson.
aragon1
Year 7 RE takeaway homework

Year 7 RE takeaway homework

Year 7 takeaway homework Students are able to choose the activities that they complete for homework. Lasts a whole term and is fully editable
wells8839
Hinduism - A Mysterious Beast, Brahman And Other Hindu Gods

Hinduism - A Mysterious Beast, Brahman And Other Hindu Gods

The best way to illustrate the diversity of Hinduism is through the story of ‘A Mysterious Beast.’ A ‘Mysterious Beast’ (essentially an elephant!) came to the Land of the Blind; the king set his courtiers to find out what it was. Each man described a different part of the elephant, all the men in the story are correct and telling the truth but only in part, as with the elephant, Hinduism is made up of many parts, though beneath all this verity there is one unchanging reality: Brahman. Brahman is believed to be the underpinning spirit of the world and to be found in everything. He has many different characteristics represented in different forms which are called avatars, or murtis. There are thousands of gods and goddesses whom which Hindus can worship, all with their own special individual characteristics, which allow followers to choose their own deities. Many believe all these gods and goddesses are different aspects of the unchanging ultimate supreme Brahman. These worksheets include a game which explains how each part of the elephant is described by the blind men and asks the students to explain how this is linked to the Hindu religion. In groups the students are given an opportunity to create a poster which will come together with the rest of the class to show as many of the Hindu god and goddesses as possible – possibly about 30 depending in the size of your class (!)
WillsonEducation
Aesop's Fables:  ‘The Crow and the Fox’ (wk 4/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘The Crow and the Fox’ (wk 4/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Aesop's Fables:  'The Boastful Traveller' (wk 3/12)

Aesop's Fables: 'The Boastful Traveller' (wk 3/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Aesop's Fables:  ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’ (wk 2/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’ (wk 2/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn