Elementary school political revolutions resources

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Russia in Transition, c.1905-1917 WJEC (Wales) and EDUQAS

Russia in Transition, c.1905-1917 WJEC (Wales) and EDUQAS

A selection of resources looking at the key events between c.1905-1917, including: 1. Russia in 1894 - problems, autocracy and opposition 2. 1905 Revolution - causes, events, consequences 3. Impact of WWI 4. Provisional Government - March-September 1917 5. Bolshevik Revolution, October 1917

By wodewee

Diamond 9: Why did some women get the vote in 1900?

Diamond 9: Why did some women get the vote in 1900?

This great diamond 9 activity has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It has been designed to be used with the full spectrum of leaners, but is particularly useful for stretching the critical thinking skills of the more able. If you are looking for a main stream resource, then please check out my card sort on this topic, which can be found in my TES shop. However, If you wish, you can also purchase both resources along with a PowerPoint with aims, objectives, starter, assessment and pupil mark scheme for an extra £1 , under the title: 'Why did some women get the vote in 1918?' When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document which can be differentiated further if you wish. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include one of the reasons why some women got the vote in 1918. Once students have cut the cards out, they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Sort the remaining diamonds to show which are ‘short’ or ‘long’ term consequences. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons why some women got the vote in 1918 and explain your reasons. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explain Once students have sorted the cards, you can extend their understanding further by discussing which factor played the most important role in persuading politicians to change their mind and give some women the vote in 1918. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?

Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?

This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying the historical controversies surrounding the campaign to get women the vote in Britain. It can be used as a starter or plenary with the full spectrum of ability and should work alongside any mainstream textbook or resource on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled 'Suffragette' and 'Suffragist', along with 20 information cards that can be sorted under one of the two headings. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How were the suffragist and suffragette campaigns different? Understand: Why were their methods and tactics different? Evaluate: Which group was the most effective? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The differences and similarities between a suffragist and a suffragette? Explain: Why were their methods and tactics different? Analyse: Which organisation was more effective at changing peoples attitudes towards women? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. For an extra £2 you can buy this resource with a PowerPoint with everything you would need for an Ofsted inspection or Lesson Observation. If you are interested you can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Card Sort: Emily Davison, accident or suicide?

Card Sort: Emily Davison, accident or suicide?

This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding the death of Emily Davison. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability as a single lesson or as a starter or plenary to work along side a mains stream textbook or resource. I have also produced an alternative source investigation card sort on this topic or if you wish you can buy both resources for the bargain price of £5. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document as well as an accompanying PowerPoint. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled 'accident' and 'suicide', along with 16 information cards that need to be sorted. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment questions, pupil mark schemes and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to Emily Davison and her background. The next two slides discuss the historical controversy and include quotes from historians supporting each interpretation. This is then followed up by completing the card sort activity. Once this is complete, students can then feedback and then do a follow up assessment on the topic. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. At various points, I have included links to useful video clips. These can be accessed when the PP is in show mode by clicking on the play button. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How did Emily Davison die? Understand: How has her death been interpreted? Evaluate: Was Emily Davison’s death a tragic accident or suicide? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: How did Emily Davison die? Explain: How does the evidence support each interpretation? Analyse: Make a judgement on whether her death was an accident or suicide? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Emily Davison: Accident or Suicide?

Emily Davison: Accident or Suicide?

This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the controversy surrounding the death of Emily Davison. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase both card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Emily Davison or Source Investigation: Emily Davison. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download two fully editable Microsoft Word documents as well as a PowerPoint. The Word documents include aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled 'accident' and 'suicide.' Depending upon the ability of your class or how much time that you have to teach this topic, you can select either the two page source investigation card sort or the more straight forward single page information card sort. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment questions, pupil mark schemes and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to Emily Davison and her background. The next two slides discuss the historical controversy and include quotes from historians supporting each interpretation. This is then followed up by using either one or both of the card sorts - if you have a mixed ability class you could always use the other card sort to provide an additional layer of differentiation. Once the card sort exercise is complete, students can then feedback and then do a follow up assessment on the topic. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. At various points, I have included links to useful video clips. These can be accessed when the PP is in show mode by clicking on the play button. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How did Emily Davison die? Understand: How has her death been interpreted? Evaluate: Was Emily Davison’s death a tragic accident or suicide? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: How did Emily Davison die? Explain: How does the evidence support each interpretation? Analyse: Make a judgement on whether her death was an accident or suicide? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

How did Hitler become Chancellor in January 1933?

How did Hitler become Chancellor in January 1933?

This ‘Disappearing Squares’ activity is a simple yet highly engaging way of reviewing the key factors that led to Hitler’s appointment as Chancellor in January 1933. It has been designed primarily for GCSE and A Level students, although with some adaptation it could equally be used with students in key stage 3. This resource can easily be customised for use with any topic area. A detailed, step-by-step guide on how to deliver this activity is also included.

By BenSmith1

The Northern Ireland Conflict

The Northern Ireland Conflict

A detailed powerpoint on the Northern Ireland Conflict covering the historical context of it and its progression (including key events like The Easter Uprising). It also has key words down one side and easy navigation with a contents of ideas on each slide. The main organizations and groups involved are explained at the start and linked back to throughout the powerpoint. 77 slides

By SarahStubington

Civil rights USA - Birmingham Alabama MLK

Civil rights USA - Birmingham Alabama MLK

Lesson that will fit into a scheme of work on civil rights. Video link provided and information summarising the event. Requires students to come up with a creative response.

By fw260

Nazi Leaders on a Revision Cube

Nazi Leaders on a Revision Cube

My top evil six Nazi Leaders names were written onto a cube. Once created the cube can act as a start activity or revision tool. Great for homework assignments. Look on my store for blank versions and more Nazi and Revision Cubes

By teacherstevenson

Interpretations of the Vietnam War

Interpretations of the Vietnam War

AQA GCSE History: Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950-1975 - The Ending of Conflict in Vietnam Describe the effects of the Vietnam War Explain the financial, social, environmental and political cost of the Vietnam War. Lesson Objective: how far did the Vietnam War shape world history?

By liam0001

AQA History: Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950-1975 - The Ending of Conflict in Vietnam Assessment

AQA History: Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950-1975 - The Ending of Conflict in Vietnam Assessment

AQA GCSE History: Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950-1975 - The Ending of Conflict in Vietnam - Nixon’s War: Vietnamisation; chemical warfare; bombing campaign of 1970–1972; relations with China; widening of the war into Laos and Cambodia. - Opposition to war: Kent State University; the importance of the media and TV in influencing public opinion; the context of the Watergate affair. - The end of the war: the Paris Peace talks; the role of Kissinger; the US withdrawal; fall of Saigon; the price of conflict; problems of Vietnam in 1975.

By liam0001

AQA History: Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950-1975 - Escalation of Conflict in Vietnam Assessment

AQA History: Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950-1975 - Escalation of Conflict in Vietnam Assessment

AQA GCSE History: Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950-1975 - Escalation of Conflict in Vietnam - The end of French colonial rule: Dien Bien Phu and its consequences; Geneva Agreement, 1954; civil war in South Vietnam; opposition to Diem; the Vietcong – aims, support, leadership and guerrilla tactics and Ho Chi Minh. - The US involvement: the Domino Theory; intervention under Eisenhower and Kennedy; Strategic Hamlets programme. - Johnson’s War: the Gulf of Tonkin; the US response to Vietcong tactics; the mass bombing campaign; demands for peace and growing student protests in the USA; My Lai and its public impact; Search and Destroy tactics and impact; the Tet Offensive and its consequences for the war.

By liam0001