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Barristers and Solicitors Presentation and Notes

Barristers and Solicitors Presentation and Notes

Included is: A presentation which contains the educational process of what barristers and solicitors must obtain in order to become the legal professions. This powerpoint contains a lot of detail about the educational process of being a barrister and a solicitor. Two documents are included which have the notes which are on the powerpoint, this makes it easy for students to understand each profession and what is needed educationally.
dkchauhan
Ethics presentation lessons - 21 ethic questions with sources for and against

Ethics presentation lessons - 21 ethic questions with sources for and against

This is a comprehensive set of lesson resources that I have created for form lesson time. The lessons begin with the PowerPoint that introduces a brief history of ethics (religion, Socrates, Kant) then gets students to consider what we mean by the term 'ethics'. A definition is provided. The teacher then goes through how the presentations will be structured and tips for giving a good quality presentation. Students then select which one of the 21 questions they would like to investigate using the sources that have been carefully provided. Many of these sources I have come across (e.g. the Sports Gene, James Mitchell). Others I have had to research. Websites links are provided. Students then plan their presentations and present for 3 to 5 minutes. There is a checklist that can be used to provide feedback. The pictures used are not under copyright protection.
rs007
Student Lawyers: Criminal Court Cases with PowerPoint CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1

Student Lawyers: Criminal Court Cases with PowerPoint CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1

Product Description Students will get the opportunity to be lawyers and prosecute or defend an accused person in a criminal trial (11 total). Each group will consist of 2 lawyers (prosecuting and defending), and an accused person. The teacher will act as the judge and guide the jury as they vote on the verdict. The majority vote determines the verdict. This unit includes court brief handouts, directions, and PowerPoint explaining how the cases will proceed. Visit my store for much more helpful and free stuff! Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.A Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.B Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.C Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.D Establish and maintain a formal style. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.E Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. This lesson is student-centered meaning: --it allows you to become a facilitator --happier teachers --happier students --happier administrators
learningisawesomewithmrsalinas
Ian Brady Myra Hindley & Moors Murders - Serial Murders - 70 Slides

Ian Brady Myra Hindley & Moors Murders - Serial Murders - 70 Slides

Moors Murders Ian Brady Myra Hindley ~ SERIAL Murders England. This product contains a full presentation, a test and flashcards. This is a complete presentation about Moors Murders by Ian Brady and Yvonne Hindley. THERE ARE MANY ACTUAL SLIDES FOR YOUR REVIEW IN THE PREVIEW. THIS IS YOUR BEST INDICATION OF PRODUCT QUALITY TEXT EXCERPT ~ Ian Brady made a fatal miscalculation in October 1965 about David Smith. ~ Smith idolized Brady but without realizing how “advanced” Brady was into crime. ~ Smith was a lower level criminal. High crimes like murdering children had never crossed his mind. ~ Brady was indoctrinating Smith as he’d done to HIndley. ~ Hindley saw the danger of letting her sister and her husband see too much but Brady would not listen to her warnings. ~ Smith’s police statement said: ~ "When I ran in, I just stood inside the living room and I saw a young lad. He was lying with his head and shoulders on the couch and his legs were on the floor. He was facing upwards. Ian was standing over him, facing him, with his legs on either side of the young lad's legs. The lad was still screaming ... Ian had a hatchet in his hand ... he was holding it above his head and he hit the lad on the left side of his head with the hatchet. I heard the blow, it was a terrible hard blow, it sounded horrible.” ~ At 6:07 am Smith made an emergency services call to the police. he told his story to the officer on duty and then made his full statement when he got to the station. ~ the police had no idea that Brady and Hindley were the killers.
carolirvin
Law - Civil Courts

Law - Civil Courts

This resource contains a powerpoint which covers the following topics of Civil Courts: Introduction of Civil Courts, The Three Track System, Civil Court Procedures, How to file a Claim, Evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages of using Civil Courts, Jurisdictions of High Court (the divisions). Alongside this, there are revision handouts which contain notes and important information for students to revise on for when they have an assessment. Each document has the needed information for the topic of civil courts. Moreover, there are definition sheets which students may need for when they read the sheets, this will help with their vocabulary in law.
dkchauhan
The rules of statutory interpretation

The rules of statutory interpretation

The presentation is an overview of the three rules and one approach to statutory interpretation. This includes a definition of the rule, relevant case examples and the advantages and disadvantages of each. It may be useful for the students to research the cases independently and attempt to apply the various rules in order to understand how application of the rules can provide either just results or absurd results.
a.colgrave