Primary suffrage and civil rights resources

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Marnti Warrajanga – A walk together

Marnti Warrajanga – A walk together

Explore milestones of the Indigenous journey of democracy in Australia and consider their relevance to today. The information and activities support the online exhibition - www.marnti-warajanga.moadoph.gov.au/ This resource contains background information, discussion questions and class activities to enhance student learning and engagement with the Marnti warajanga – a walk together exhibition. Deceased person’s warning: Please note: Indigenous Australians are advised that this exhibition may contain images and voices of deceased persons.

By MoADLearning

Diamond 9: Why did some women get the vote in 1900?

Diamond 9: Why did some women get the vote in 1900?

This great diamond 9 activity has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It has been designed to be used with the full spectrum of leaners, but is particularly useful for stretching the critical thinking skills of the more able. If you are looking for a main stream resource, then please check out my card sort on this topic, which can be found in my TES shop. However, If you wish, you can also purchase both resources along with a PowerPoint with aims, objectives, starter, assessment and pupil mark scheme for an extra £1 , under the title: 'Why did some women get the vote in 1918?' When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document which can be differentiated further if you wish. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include one of the reasons why some women got the vote in 1918. Once students have cut the cards out, they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Sort the remaining diamonds to show which are ‘short’ or ‘long’ term consequences. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons why some women got the vote in 1918 and explain your reasons. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explain Once students have sorted the cards, you can extend their understanding further by discussing which factor played the most important role in persuading politicians to change their mind and give some women the vote in 1918. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Card Sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

Card Sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability a s a starter or plenary. If you wish, you can purchase this resource with a PowerPoint with aims, objectives, starter, assessment and pupil mark scheme for an extra £1 , under the title: 'Why did some women get the vote in 1918?' I've also thrown in my diamond 9 activity on this topic, which can be used for additional differentiation for your higher ability students. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics' as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. Once students have sorted the cards, you can extend their understanding further by discussing which factor played the most important role in persuading politicians to change their mind and give some women the vote in 1918. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase the card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? However, to sweeten the deal, I have also included my diamond 9 activity, which can be given to your gifted and talented or more able for as a separate task to extend their critical thinking skills. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document as well as a PowerPoint. The Word document include aims, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment question, pupil mark scheme and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to why some women got the vote in 1918, with an appropriate link to a video clip on YouTube. It is assumed that you have already studied the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist as prior knowledge. The next slide facilitates the card sort, whilst the fourth slide facilitates a pair / group discussion on which factor was the most important. Once this is complete, students can do a follow up assessment on the topic either for homework or next lesson. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?

Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?

This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying the historical controversies surrounding the campaign to get women the vote in Britain. It can be used as a starter or plenary with the full spectrum of ability and should work alongside any mainstream textbook or resource on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled 'Suffragette' and 'Suffragist', along with 20 information cards that can be sorted under one of the two headings. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How were the suffragist and suffragette campaigns different? Understand: Why were their methods and tactics different? Evaluate: Which group was the most effective? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The differences and similarities between a suffragist and a suffragette? Explain: Why were their methods and tactics different? Analyse: Which organisation was more effective at changing peoples attitudes towards women? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. For an extra £2 you can buy this resource with a PowerPoint with everything you would need for an Ofsted inspection or Lesson Observation. If you are interested you can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Emily Davison Martyr Mystery Lesson

Emily Davison Martyr Mystery Lesson

A set of lesson resources on Emily Davison. Students look at many pieces of 'evidence' to decide whether Emily Davison intended to kill herself or not. They then conclude with an activity of their choice (newspaper article, paragraph or sort cards). Designed for KS3 (Year 8/9). Students love this ! A memorable lesson. Please see my page for a whole SOW on Suffragettes and Suffragists.

By ekch23

Suffragettes and Suffragists Resources/SOW

Suffragettes and Suffragists Resources/SOW

A set of 8 lessons on the Suffragettes and Suffragists, suitable for Year 8 or Year 9 students. All lessons include learning objectives, a variety of activities, challenge and extension tasks and worksheets/resources. These lessons have been updated from my previous uploads. Great reviews and downloads previously! :-) NB: The 'Evidence' is for L4. Emily Davison murder mystery.

By ekch23

What was the difference between a Suffragette and a Suffragists?

What was the difference between a Suffragette and a Suffragists?

This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversies surrounding the campaign to get women the vote in Britain. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability and should work alongside any mainstream textbook or resource on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document as well as an accompanying PowerPoint. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled 'Suffragette' and 'Suffragist', along with 20 information cards that can be sorted under one of the two headings. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides , sources and appropriate video clip links. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief introduction to the historical controversy. The next 6 slides describe the aims, objectives and methods used by both groups. This is then followed up by completing the card sort activity. Once this is complete, students can then feedback and then do a follow up source assessment on the topic. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. At various points, I have included links to useful video clips. These can be accessed when the PP is in show mode by clicking on the play button. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How were the suffragist and suffragette campaigns different? Understand: Why were their methods and tactics different? Evaluate: Which group was the most effective? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The differences and similarities between a suffragist and a suffragette? Explain: Why were their methods and tactics different? Analyse: Which organisation was more effective at changing peoples attitudes towards women? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins