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WJEC EDUQAS GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES – REVISION MATERIALS – CHRISTIAN BELIEFS

WJEC EDUQAS GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES – REVISION MATERIALS – CHRISTIAN BELIEFS

This is a set of revision sheets for WJEC GCSE Religious Studies for Christianity - Beliefs. It takes into account the question forms asked in the published SAMS, presenting material to support revision for the angles of questioning they pose. So it covers key terms, key and other teachings, general and specific religious information to do with each topic, and examples of diversity in belief/ practice. The reverse of each two-sided sheet provides guidance on answering each of the question types from the SAMS - so that students can become more familiar and so comfortable with the topics in exam terms. There are a number of sample questions for students to practise with in each format. The sheets can be used as a revision tool at home, as notes for class, to set homework from the questions on there. They also form a good basic level of knowledge for any teacher, and good examples of questions which can be explored with classes.
Charliebgood
Augustine - The Problem of Evil

Augustine - The Problem of Evil

This resources is an A Level topic however I created this lesson as a challenge for my KS3 Yr8 class - they loved it! It is interactive and pushes students to think philosophically. Playdough model activity (optional!) Introduction to Augustine Step by step guide to Augustine’s solution Progress checks throughout Challenging questions
HannahP1191
Assembly: B is for Being Yourself

Assembly: B is for Being Yourself

It is good to have goals and dreams in life and to work towards them. We also need to learn to accept ourselves for who we are. This assembly story is about someone who learns that very lesson. This comprehensive pack includes: A fully scripted assembly including an introduction and reflection with key questions throughout, A presentation (PDF) complete with engaging images, A set of Key Word cards to enhance understanding, A reward certificate. Themes explored include: goals, ambitions, lessons, responsible, pride, understanding, acceptance.
MySchoolAssembly
Aesop's Fables:  ´The Lion and the Hare´ (Week 8/12)

Aesop's Fables: ´The Lion and the Hare´ (Week 8/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Peace and Conflict Scheme of Work

Peace and Conflict Scheme of Work

A scheme of work which covers the causes of war, how it is justified politically and religiously, nuclear war, pacifism, north korea, 9.11 and terrorism, with an opportunity for an creative and analytical assessment. I've tweaked, modified and re-vamped these resources to maximise engagement and learning for 2018.
DavidFew
Aesop's Fables:  ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ (Week 7/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ (Week 7/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
The United Nations

The United Nations

A lesson to explore the UN and what it does. This lesson aims to give students an understanding of the organisation and the means to question if it is a reasonable use of resources, or a waste of them. Class debates included, as usual, with extension activities, youtube videos, and plenty of varied activities to bolster engagement. A SEND worksheet also attached here. Learning Questions What is the United Nations? What are its aims? Do you think it’s a good organisation?
DavidFew
Aesop's Fables:  ‘Crow and the Swan’  (Week 6/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘Crow and the Swan’ (Week 6/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Christian opinions to War

Christian opinions to War

A lesson which explores Christian Attitudes to War. Learning Questions include: What are Christian Opinions to War? Why do Christians disagree with each other? EXT: How do you think social background affects peoples opinions? This powerpoint looks includes extension activities, independent learning activities and joint discussion. It covers citizenship, PHSE, SEAL, SMSC and Religious Studies syllabi (I love that plural) and I have found it to be a fairly engaging lesson for many students. It also includes a link to a youtube video animation to the parable of the lost son, and links this to the topic of war and peace for students to consider how religious teachings may be applied to modern day dilemmas. Not dilemmi. Sadly.
DavidFew
The Just War Theory

The Just War Theory

A lesson designed to explore the Just War Theory in a collaborative, group work activity that emphasizes team work. This leads on to a creative activity where students create a poster, poem or rap to exemplify the Just War Theory’s 7 aspects. Learning Questions include: What is the Just War Theory? Do I agree with it? Why? Differentiated learning outcomes included, which evaluate why Christians may or may not agree with the Just War Theory. All activities are clearly explained in the Powerpoint, and a variety of extension activities for more able students are included.
DavidFew
Causes of War

Causes of War

A lesson that explores the learning questions: What causes war? Is war ever justified? Using a game students explore in teams of 6 the possible causes of war, and evaluate if they are worthwhile. Differentiated learning outcomes and links to youtube videos included, this lesson has been tweaked over a course of 5 years into something that works for me in the classroom. It includes guided discussion and debate topics, as well as some religious opinions in the form of Augustine’s just war theory. Any necessary instructions included in the powerpoint notes.
DavidFew
Aesop's Fables: ‘Who will Bell the Cat?’ (wk 5/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘Who will Bell the Cat?’ (wk 5/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn