Ethics Card Sort: Cloning Arguments For & Against

Ethics Card Sort: Cloning Arguments For & Against

The issue of whether scientists should be allowed to cone animals to help solve a variety of problems from food shortages, organ failure and infertility is a hotly debated topic. This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the ethical and religious arguments for and against cloning. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen fully editable statements that can sorted under them. I’ve also linked in three video clips to this page which are worthwhile watching with your students depending on their ability. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: The Value of LIfe Know: What is cloning? Understand: What are the arguments for and against the use of cloning by scientists? Evaluate: Should scientist interfere with the laws of nature and natural conception through cloning? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is cloning and why are some people opposed to it? Explain - the arguments for and against using cloning? Analyze - Should scientist interfere with the laws of nature and natural conception through cloning? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
Y9 Civics - What Influences Voters

Y9 Civics - What Influences Voters

Presentation on what influences voters, with resources, graphs and clips. Also includes a cat theme throughout! Year 9 Civics & Citizenships - Humanities & Social Sciences. How citizens’ choices are shaped at election time (e.g. public debate, media, opinion polls, advertising, interest groups, political party campaigns) (ACHCK076)
rachelwhitty
American Politics 'How to become the president of the United States' whole lesson Plan

American Politics 'How to become the president of the United States' whole lesson Plan

Resources to help students write a guide with the title ‘How to become the president of the United States.’ Attached is a powerpoint to show as a starter t the students and an extract from US Government and Politics for A Level by Anthony Bennett for the students to independently read. You can then ask them complete this as a written document, a PowerPoint or as a video. This needs to include: the constitutional (legal) requirements to be president. The extra constitutional requirements (things the candidate will probably need in order to stand a chance of getting elected.) Some examples of when candidates succeeded having broken the ‘rules’. A timeline for the key events in the election process – the invisible primary, primary and caucuses etc. and the dates when these occur. Names of the winning/losing candidates and their party in at least three Presidential elections. A paragraph on why the invisible primary is important, quoting some key names and statistics to support your argument.
AnnabelJames1982
David Cameron: my war on multiculturalism (ARTICLE + COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS)

David Cameron: my war on multiculturalism (ARTICLE + COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS)

This resource consists of an article written in the Independent in 2011, plus accompanying comprehension questions which I created. It was originally used with EAL 6th-formers but could be used throughout KS4 and KS5, not just in English but also in politics lessons. The questions range from asking students to define extremism and terrorism, encouraging student understanding of policy-making, and inviting student opinion on aspects of policy.
Angelil
Card Sort: What were the arguments for and against pit closures in 1992?

Card Sort: What were the arguments for and against pit closures in 1992?

In late 1992, the UK government announced that it would begin a process to close its remaining 31 coal mines with the loss of 30,000 jobs. The government argued that Britain no longer needed British coal as it could import its energy sources such as a lot more cheaply from elsewhere. This led to a ‘Dash for Gas’ with Britain’s once mighty coal industry being shut down. There were many other benefits and downsides to closing the pits. This outstanding card sort is designed to help students understand and assess some of the arguments for and against closing the pits in 1992. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen fully editable statements that can sorted under them. I have also linked in video clip from the parliamentary debate on this issue with a speech from Tony Ben, which are worthwhile watching with your students, depending on their ability. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Know: Why did the UK government decide to close its remaining coal mines in 1992? Understand: What were the arguments for and against pit closures? Evaluate: Should the British government have decided to close down the coal industry in 1992? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did the UK government decide to close its remaining coal mines in 1992? Explain: What were the arguments for and against pit closures? Analyse: Should the British government have decided to close down the coal industry in 1992? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
Grenfell Tower - What Happened and Who Was to Blame?

Grenfell Tower - What Happened and Who Was to Blame?

A series of five lessons in which students complete a hunt around the classroom to compile a timeline of events leading up to the fire and what happened afterwards. Students then complete a range of engaging activities including poster making, scavenger hunts in relation to articles and debates to decide who they think was to blame for the disaster. The final two lessons are based around writing a letter to the body they feel is to blame, persuading them to make amends for their actions. A detailed PowerPoint is included for all five lessons, along with all worksheets and resources needed.
amymwoodhouse
AQA A Level Politics - Politics of the UK - Voting Behaviour

AQA A Level Politics - Politics of the UK - Voting Behaviour

This lesson looks at the reasons why people vote, why they don’t vote, the parties, leaders and the media. This is lesson 5 but will be taught over a number of weeks and has a presentation for students to complete. Lesson 5 in the Dual Model for Teacher A
MZCS
AQA A Level Politics - UK Politics - Democracy

AQA A Level Politics - UK Politics - Democracy

This is the introductory lesson to the AQA Scheme of Work on Democracy, it asks students what democracy is and looks at the Key Concepts and Purpose of Democracy. Lesson 1 in the Dual Model for Teacher A.
MZCS
Criminal Justice Reform

Criminal Justice Reform

In this multi-week unit, students dissect the American criminal justice system by creating their own laws and applying them to real criminal cases. Optionally paired with the novel Monster by Walter Dean Myers, the unit begins with students running a mock trial for Batman using a flowchart to demonstrate the steps most criminal suspects encounter. Students then team up to design their own criminal justice systems by establishing laws on twelve topics ranging from drug policy and mandatory minimums to police body cameras and juvenile detention. Using Twine, an online tool for interactive storytelling, teams walk through seven real-world cases. The outcome of each case is determined by that team’s previously established laws and by real-time decisions made on behalf of various stakeholders. Topics addressed: The American criminal justice system - laws, policies, politics, history and examples of real criminal cases Primary CT concepts: decomposition and algorithmic thinking. Students approach a massive social justice topic one policy and one case at a time, slowly developing their knowledge and coming to understand the broader implications. Also, students learn the key steps criminals encounter as they are processed through the criminal justice system and how changes to that process lead to new outcomes. Students will be able to: Evaluate criminal justice policies and implement changes to existing laws Apply their modified criminal justice policies to real-world criminal cases Understand the elements of the criminal justice process common to all cases Materials: Criminal justice flowchart (printed large or projected) Criminal Justice Reform web app Lined paper or a Google Doc assignment where students can record written responses to questions posed throughout each real-world criminal case Copies of Monster by Walter Dean Myers, if students will be reading it during this unit Prep: Print the criminal justice flowchart as large as you can, or decide that you will project it for your students Create team codes in the Criminal Justice Reform web app. Each team of 2-4 students will need their own team code. Suggested unit breakdown: Due to TES length limitations, please find day-by-day instructions here.
eli17
Card Sort: Ethics - Just War Theory

Card Sort: Ethics - Just War Theory

Can the massive death and destruction of armed conflict ever be morally justified? Is there such a thing as a just war? Should we stand by and allow innocent people be raped and murdered in horrible acts of genocide? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the main arguments for and against the Just War Theory. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order and then sick into their books before they have a go at the extended writing activity / discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page, fully editable Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen carefully selected statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: What is the Just War Theory? Understand: What are the arguments for and against waging a just war? Evaluate: Are there any moral circumstances in which it s acceptable to wage war? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - The Just War Theory Explain - the arguments for and against fighting a just war? Analyze - Are there any moral circumstances in which it is acceptable to wage war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
July Bargain for First Time Customers

July Bargain for First Time Customers

First time customer? Use the TES Code SUPERFLYJULY to get this bundle of my best selling resources before the end of July. It includes resources for KS3 and GCSE. Activity types range from roleplay and simulation type exercises that take a lot of planning through to activities that break down sources and aid students when analysing them. There’s also some award winning video clips in here. Featured on the BBC, they are intended to act as short but engaging stimulus materials. The first time buyers use SUPERFLYJULY. Existing buyers, it’s a very big discount I’m putting on these so save yourself some planning!
dmoorhouse
Card Sort: Fox Hunting Debate

Card Sort: Fox Hunting Debate

Fox hunting has become for many an emotive issue with the views of the countryside and cities diverging other whether the sport is a cruel or natural past time. This resource aims to help students understand some of the key issues and help then come to a balanced conclusion on the morality of fox hunting. It be used alongside any main stream text book or video clip as a starter, mini plenary or a consolidation exercise. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen statements that can sorted to help summarise the arguments for and against the ban being lifted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Rights and Responsibilities Know: What is Fox hunting and why was it banned? Understand: What are the arguments for and against lifting the ban on Fox hunting? Evaluate: Should the hunting of all animals be banned or is fox hunting a special case? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is Fox hunting and why was it banned? Explain - the arguments for and against lifting the ban on fox hunting? Analyse - If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
20 AP World History Classroom Quote Posters

20 AP World History Classroom Quote Posters

20 AP World History Posters for use as display. These posters promote interest in historical thinking and raise awareness of the importance of the past. The quotes come from notable people from a variety of backgrounds. From Presidents and Prime Ministers to authors and scientists. These posters can be used to prompt discussion about specific issues, are suitable for use in promotional displays and for more able learners can be used to challenge their perceptions of what history is and why it should be studied. Combined with our other materials they can be used as part of a year binder or planner.
dmoorhouse
20 History Quotation Posters for Display and Stimulus

20 History Quotation Posters for Display and Stimulus

20 posters based on famous historical quotations. They are ideal for display or for use as a discussion point. Posters such as these can reinforce the significance of HIstory, making them useful for parents evenings and displays at school events. Many quotes about History are worthy of discussion. They often relate to the uses and misuses of the past, making them ideal prompts for discussion in tutor sessions and citizenship sessions. See my other resources for additional quotation posters and resources. They can be changed weekly to provide variety or to match up with specific areas that are being taught.
dmoorhouse
Wordsearch puzzle for Hamlet - William Shakespeare (30 words)

Wordsearch puzzle for Hamlet - William Shakespeare (30 words)

This is a preview of the Shakespeare wordsearch pack up for sale on the Kids’ Printouts account. This is a 30-word wordsearch and like wordsearches in general, is a great task to include in children’s learning to help them recall information about the story, reinforce spellings, encourage discussion, and to prepare them for a comprehension activity. It’s also great for pattern recognition and drawing lines too!
kidsprintouts
Democracy - Design your own political party

Democracy - Design your own political party

Lesson about what Democracy means, Learn the names of the political parties in the UK. Find out which random laws are true or false! Show your class my modelled example of a new political party which the laws I’d put into place. Then show them the success criteria to make their own political party which can be voted on at the end of the lesson. Who is ready to be Prime Minister?
Kayleighp92
Card Sort: Ethics Does Prison Work?

Card Sort: Ethics Does Prison Work?

This thought provocative resource aims to help students assess whether prison sentences work. This is a controversial subject with people from all sides advocating different solutions from longer sentences to rehabilitate prisoners to alternatives sentences based in the community. This card sort can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students excited, engaged, whilst improving their understanding of this difficult topic. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two headings cards labeled ‘Pros / Advantages’ and ‘Cons / Disadvantages’ as well as sixteen information cards to be sorted. At the end of the document there is an extension question designed to help consolidate the lesson. This is a fully editable document which can be customized if necessary to suit your students. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Crime and Punishment Know: How are people supported in prison? Understand: What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Evaluate: Does prison protect society from crime? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - How are people treated in prison? Explain - What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Analyze - Does prison protect society from crime? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
Moral Philosophy

Moral Philosophy

These excellent resources have bundled together to give you outstanding value. The over a range of social, moral, spiritual and cultural issues that relate to a number of subjects. If you would like to know more then please click on each resource. They are aimed at the fully range of ability. You can cut them out and put them into an envelop for students to sort or you can get them to cut, sort and stick them into their books. Failing that they can create a key or use highlighters and stick the information into their books.
Roy_Huggins
SMSC Card Sorts

SMSC Card Sorts

These excellent resources have bundled together to give you outstanding value. The over a range of social, moral, spiritual and cultural issues that relate to a number of subjects. If you would like to know more then please click on each resource. They are aimed at the fully range of ability. You can cut them out and put them into an envelop for students to sort or you can get them to cut, sort and stick them into their books. Failing that they can create a key or use highlighters and stick the whole sheet into their books. In terms of the price, I will keep on adding resources to this bundle, if you buy now then you will get all the new resources for free! I have also produced an American version of these resources called Moral Philosophy, but this bundle is smaller and the resources included have been especially adapted for US schools. If you would like some further updates, then please follow me on the TES or facebook.
Roy_Huggins
Card Sort: Abortion Debate

Card Sort: Abortion Debate

This issue of abortion is a controversial subject, which has to be handled with sensitivity. On the one side we have pro choice who advocate abortion as key to women achieving equality with men, whilst on the other we have pro life who argue that far from helping women achieve equality it actually allows society to continue to ignore the issues that face women such as equal pay, childcare and promotion on merit. This outstanding resources has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the main arguments for and against abortion. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: What is abortion? Understand: What are the arguments for and against Abortion? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which it s acceptable to take another life? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - what is Euthanasia? Explain - the arguments for and against Euthanasia? Analyze - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to take another life? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
Card Sort: Ethics - Should the government fund the arts?

Card Sort: Ethics - Should the government fund the arts?

We live in an age of government cut backs and competing claims for tax payer funding for social and health care. This outstanding resources has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against government funding for the arts. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Government and Politics Know: How does the government fund the arts? Understand: What are the arguments for and against government funding of the arts? Evaluate: How far should the government fund the arts? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - How does the government fund the arts? Explain - the arguments for and against government funding of the arts? Analyze - How far should the government fund the arts? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
Card Sort: Should the government fund the arts?

Card Sort: Should the government fund the arts?

We live in an age of government cut backs and competing claims for tax payer funding for social and health care. This outstanding resources has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against government funding for the arts. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order and then sick into their books before they have a go at the extended writing activity / discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural Education Know: How does the government fund the arts? Understand: What are the arguments for and against government funding of the arts? Evaluate: How far should the government fund the arts? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - How does the government fund the arts? Explain - the arguments for and against government funding of the arts? Analyse - How far should the government fund the arts? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
Project: Creating A Political Party

Project: Creating A Political Party

A lesson and collection of resources to span a week of English lesson. The lesson attached explains the key aspects of what students need to complete while the booklet contains all of the necessary information to help students create the relevant resources for presentation. Each task has a simple and developed brief, easy to follow and allowing for students’ creativity and imagination to have free reign. Aimed at and successfully taught to mixed ability KS3 but skills are transferable and aspects could be used to prepare KS4 students for AQA Language P2 Q5- speech writing.
lewisdbmitchell
Movie Guide: 13th (Netflix documentary)

Movie Guide: 13th (Netflix documentary)

This 90 minute documentary produced by Netflix chronicles the trend in mass incarcerations, with emphasis on its impact on African American males. It follows trends in legislation through the Nixon, Reagan, Bush and Clinton presidencies and how policy decisions have negatively impacted minorities disproportionally. It also examines the role of ALEC in crafting legislative policy and how member corporations directly benefit from increased mass incarcerations. This documentary would be excellent for any Ethnic Studies or Social Studies class where you are discussing civil rights, racial disparities, and how current legislative policies affect populations differently in the US. Download contains 30 questions that accompany the documentary chronologically and a list of suggested follow up activities for students to take their learning to the next level around the issue.
wumpus30
A level politics taster session

A level politics taster session

A taster session for students considering taking up A level politics. It is designed for those centres taking the USA option of Edexcel, but could be adapted e.g. for AQA or other boards. It involves a discussion, a card sort, a look at a short video and the use of predictions and data. I’ve used it for a 30 minute session and for a longer 50 minute session, but drew out the discussions more in the latter.
jpdhanna
GCSE Citizenship 9-1 Active Citizenship Campaign Ideas

GCSE Citizenship 9-1 Active Citizenship Campaign Ideas

Not sure how to plan the 15% active citizenship element of the GCSE course? This document will provide you with a variety of campaign ideas and areas for students to research. All ideas are topical and meet the exam boards’ criteria. This document contains exam board specific (AQA, EDEXCEL and OCR) guidance and student checklists to ensure you can arrange opportunities for students to make the most of their campaign. Examples of campaigns in action are also provided. Note: the OCR exam board provides the biggest remit for campaigning. The other two exam boards (AQA and EDEXCEL) are more prescriptive in what campaigns they like to see with a focus on local and national and less on international reach. If in doubt, always contact the exam board. Good luck! Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter You may also want to check out our very popular GCSE Citizenship 9-1 Lessons, Assessments, Revision guides, trackers and work booklets. Here are a few examples: Active Citizenship Campaigning PLC Tracker Role of the Police Service Workbooklet History of the UK double Lesson
thecre8tiveresources
AQA GCSE CITIZENSHIP (9-1) REVISION PLC

AQA GCSE CITIZENSHIP (9-1) REVISION PLC

AQA Personalised Learning Checklist GCSE CITIZENSHIP (9-1) Revision This 13 page document covers 100+ topics, can be used by students to help structure their revision for the new AQA GCSE CITIZENSHIP. Designed to help support potentially struggling students by providing a renewed focus on 100% exam revision for AQA GCSE CITIZENSHIP 9-1 This document is the most important part of your revision and prep. How can it be used? Here are just a few suggestions to get the most of this revision aid; Colour code how much you know already for each topic As you complete revision and grow in confidence on each topic colour more boxes and tick if you have completed the revision. -Use your textbook and exercise book to help focus your revision. -Peer and self-assessment -Revision material before exams -Extension/ review activity in a lesson Also contains a checklist for the active citizenship element of the course, which accounts for 15% of the final mark. (24/160 marks) Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter You may also want to check out our very popular GCSE Citizenship 9-1 Lessons, Assessments, Revision guides, trackers and work booklets. Here are a few examples: Active Citizenship Campaigning PLC Tracker Role of the Police Service Workbooklet History of the UK double Lesson
thecre8tiveresources
EDEXCEL GCSE CITIZENSHIP (9-1) REVISION PLC

EDEXCEL GCSE CITIZENSHIP (9-1) REVISION PLC

EDEXCEL Personalised Learning Checklist GCSE CITIZENSHIP (9-1) Revision This 12 page document covers 100+ topics, can be used by students to help structure their revision for the new EDEXCEL GCSE CITIZENSHIP. Designed to help support potentially struggling students by providing a renewed focus on 100% exam revision for EDEXCEL GCSE CITIZENSHIP 9-1 This document is the most important part of your revision and prep. How can it be used? Here are just a few suggestions to get the most of this revision aid; Colour code how much you know already for each topic As you complete revision and grow in confidence on each topic colour more boxes and tick if you have completed the revision. -Use your textbook and exercise book to help focus your revision. -Peer and self-assessment -Revision material before exams -Extension/ review activity in a lesson Also contains a checklist for the active citizenship element of the course, which accounts for 15% of the final mark. (24/160 marks) Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter You may also want to check out our very popular GCSE Citizenship 9-1 Lessons, Assessments, Revision guides, trackers and work booklets. Here are a few examples: Active Citizenship Campaigning OCR PLC Tracker NGO’s Workbooklet History of the UK double Lesson
thecre8tiveresources
OCR GCSE CITIZENSHIP (9-1) REVISION PLC

OCR GCSE CITIZENSHIP (9-1) REVISION PLC

OCR Personalised Learning Checklist GCSE CITIZENSHIP (9-1) Revision This 14 page document covers 100+ topics, can be used by students to help structure their revision for the new OCR GCSE CITIZENSHIP. Designed to help support potentially struggling students by providing a renewed focus on 100% exam revision for OCR GCSE CITIZENSHIP 9-1 This document is the most important part of your revision and prep. How can it be used? Here are just a few suggestions to get the most of this revision aid; Colour code how much you know already for each topic As you complete revision and grow in confidence on each topic colour more boxes and tick if you have completed the revision. -Use your textbook and exercise book to help focus your revision. -Peer and self-assessment -Revision material before exams -Extension/ review activity in a lesson Also contains a checklist for the active citizenship element of the course, which accounts for 15% of the final mark. (30/200 marks) Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter You may also want to check out our very popular GCSE Citizenship 9-1 Lessons, Assessments, Revision guides, trackers and work booklets. Here are a few examples: Active Citizenship Campaigning AQA PLC Tracker Role of the Police Service Workbooklet History of the UK double Lesson
thecre8tiveresources
Armed Forces Day or militarism?

Armed Forces Day or militarism?

This is a creative way to tackle controversial questions surrounding Remembrance, the armed forces, war and militarism. This attractive poster and the accompanying activities elicit debate and discussion about the reality and ethics of military involvement in British society. Armed Forces Day is a particularly relevant time to open up this discussion in your Citizenship, PSHE lessons and meet your SMSC requirements. It also lends itself to Philosophy for Children sessions at primary or secondary. Everything shown is ‘real’ - something that does happen on the streets of Britain. We’ve provided the resource as a PDF, an image and a clickable webpage (meaning you can click on individual parts of the image and see a related video, report or news story; students could explore this individually or be led through it on an a whiteboard. You can order printed hard copies (free, just pay postage) from http://bookshop.quaker.org.uk We’ve also suggested a range of activities to elicit interesting discussion in the attached document.
QuakerPeaceEducation
Abortion  - Hinduism & Christianity (GCSE Lesson Pack)

Abortion - Hinduism & Christianity (GCSE Lesson Pack)

This is a set of 4 lessons about the topic of abortion for GCSE Religious Studies. It deals with Hindu & Christian perspective and is ideal for any teacher covering Hinduism as a comparative religion at GCSE level. This pack covers one topic: you can save money by buying the entire 17 lesson unit here. All lessons are professionally designed by a dedicated Tes Recommended Author who has extensive experience teaching Religious Studies, Philosophy & Ethics. Positive reviews are warmly welcome! The contents of this page, the download, and all included materials are copyrighted by Adam Godwin (2017) System Requirements: Microsoft Office (PowerPoint & Word) Printing (for worksheets) 512MB Ram 1.5GHZ Processor Check-out some of my most popular resources: GCSE Religious Studies Buddhism (20 Lesson Unit) Buddhism (Thematic Studies Units) Christianity (Thematic Studies Units) Hinduism (20 Lesson Unit) Islam (Thematic Studies Units) .    GCSE Sociology Resources Complete Units (Whole Course) .  AS/A2 Revision Sessions OCR Religious Studies AQA Philosophy AQA Sociology .  Philosophy for Children (P4C) The Ultimate P4C Resource Pack The Debating Society Toolkit Philosophy Boxes . Other Tools A3 DIRT Worksheet (15+ 5-star ratings!) KS3 RE Units
godwin86
Hinduism & Christianity - Religion & Life (17 Lessons)

Hinduism & Christianity - Religion & Life (17 Lessons)

This collection of 17 lessons is for GCSE Religious Studies teachers who are teaching Christianity & Hinduism. It is for Theme B of the AQA Religious Studies specification: Religion & Life. It includes 10 lessons about Christian beliefs and 7 lessons about Hindu beliefs. It also includes three bonus resources that I hope will be useful to you. Lesson 1-10 (Christianity) Introduction Central Debates Christian Views About The Origins & Value of The World Christian Views About The Origins of Life Animal Ethics & Animal Testing Abortion & Christianity ICT Suite Lesson Euthanasia & Christianity Assessment Lesson Unit Overview (Video-Learning Worksheet Lesson) Lesson 11-17 (Hinduism) 11) Abortion (1) 12) Abortion (2) 13) Euthanasia (1) 14) Euthanasia (2) 15) Animal Experimentation 16) Unit Overview (Hinduism) 17) Unit Overview (Hinduism) It includes three bonus resources: -A Personal Learning Checklist for this unit -A debate generator (revision tool) -Learning Mats / Posters Each lesson is fully resourced and includes a lesson plan, homework, AfL tasks. Most lessons are based around professionally designed A3 worksheets. This download is designed to be everything you need in order to teach this theme and cover Christian & Hindu perspectives. Whilst designed around the AQA specification, it is certainly relevant to all GCSE Religious Studies teachers covering Christianity & Hinduism. Positive reviews are warmly welcome! The contents of this page, the download, and all included materials are copyrighted by Adam Godwin (2017) System Requirements: Microsoft Office (PowerPoint & Word) Printing (for the worksheet) 512MB Ram 1.5GHZ Processor Check-out some of my most popular resources: GCSE Religious Studies Buddhism (20 Lesson Unit) Buddhism (Thematic Studies Units) Christianity (Thematic Studies Units) Hinduism (20 Lesson Unit) Islam (Thematic Studies Units) .    GCSE Sociology Resources Complete Units (Whole Course) .  AS/A2 Revision Sessions OCR Religious Studies AQA Philosophy AQA Sociology .  Philosophy for Children (P4C) The Ultimate P4C Resource Pack The Debating Society Toolkit Philosophy Boxes . Other Tools A3 DIRT Worksheet (15+ 5-star ratings!) KS3 RE Units
godwin86
GCSE Hinduism - Religion & Life (7 Lessons)

GCSE Hinduism - Religion & Life (7 Lessons)

This seven lesson unit is for teachers covering Hinduism as a comparative religion at GCSE level. It covers Theme B: ‘Religion & Life’ and focuses on Hindu views, beliefs and teachings. It was designed around the GCSE AQA specification (Theme B), and, consequently, covers the three topics listed: • Abortion. • Euthanasia. • Animal experimentation. Each lesson is fully resourced and includes a lesson plan, homework, AfL tasks. Most lessons are based around professionally designed A3 worksheets. Whilst designed for the AQA specification, it is relevant to any GCSE Religious Studies teacher covering Hinduism. You can buy this 7 lesson unit alongside a 10-lesson Christianity Thematic Study Unit in one bundle to save money. The lessons included are outlined as follows: Lesson 1 - Abortion (Comparing Christian & Hindu Views) Lesson 2 - Abortion (Hindu Views) Lesson 3 - Euthanasia (Hindu Views) Lesson 4 - Euthanasia (Comparing Christian & Hindu Views) Lesson 5 - Animal Experimentation Lesson 6 - Unit Overview Lesson 7 - Unit Overview Positive reviews are warmly welcome! The contents of this page, the download, and all included materials are copyrighted by Adam Godwin (2017) Contents may differ slightly from those depicted on the cover photo, which are meant to be a fair illustration of the quality and activities contained in the download. System Requirements: Microsoft Office (PowerPoint & Word) Printing (for the worksheet) 512MB Ram 1.5GHZ Processor Check-out some of my most popular resources: GCSE Religious Studies Buddhism (20 Lesson Unit) Buddhism (Thematic Studies Units) Christianity (Thematic Studies Units) Hinduism (20 Lesson Unit) Islam (Thematic Studies Units) .    GCSE Sociology Resources Complete Units (Whole Course) .  AS/A2 Revision Sessions OCR Religious Studies AQA Philosophy AQA Sociology .  Philosophy for Children (P4C) The Ultimate P4C Resource Pack The Debating Society Toolkit Philosophy Boxes . Other Tools A3 DIRT Worksheet (15+ 5-star ratings!) KS3 RE Units
godwin86
Attack Adverts/Smear Campaign

Attack Adverts/Smear Campaign

Lesson on political attack adverts and smear campaigns. The lesson identifies what an attack ad is, it’s purpose and effect. Examples of attack ads are shown and discussed, and then students create their own attack ads for a political party. Full lesson is included, with links to videos and articles within the slides. This lesson takes around a 1 hour lesson (time can be expanded for the creation of the attack ad).
Geog2014
Propaganda

Propaganda

Lesson on propaganda. The lesson looks at what propaganda is, different types of propaganda and then students create their own piece of propaganda for a political party. Full lesson is included, with links to videos and articles within the slides. This lesson takes around a 1 hour lesson.
Geog2014
Feminisim

Feminisim

A very well planned and resourced sociology lesson on feminism. Suitable for KS4 students or as an introductory lesson for KS5 students.
Norhan5
Abortion - Hindu Views & Teachings (GCSE RS - Hinduism - Religion & Life) L2/7

Abortion - Hindu Views & Teachings (GCSE RS - Hinduism - Religion & Life) L2/7

This fully resourced lesson is for those teaching Hinduism as a comparative religion at GCSE level. It is the second in our seven-lesson Hinduism unit for Theme B: ‘Religion & Life’ and focuses on Hindu views, teachings and beliefs about abortion. It was designed with the AQA Religious Studies specification in mind, but relevant to all GCSE Religious Studies teachers covering Hinduism. The lesson features starters, learning objectives, key-words, key-information, a colour double-sided A3 worksheet, AfL tasks, discussion and debate tasks and homework. This download includes: -A full lesson PowerPoint -A double-sided colour A3 worksheet [please ignore the broken preview on Tes! It’s beautiful :) ] -A set of A3 group-work debate worksheets -A detailed lesson plan -AfL tasks & homework The lesson is centered around a double-sided colour A3 worksheet and A3 debate worksheets. All necessary resources to run the lesson are included in this download. All included resources are editable. We’ve made 10-lesson units covering Christian views for each of the themes, you can now bolster these with 7-lesson add-on units for the comparative religions: in this case Hinduism. Download individual units or all 17 lessons (Christianity & Hinduism) together to save money! Positive reviews are warmly welcome! The contents of this page, the download, and all included materials are copyrighted by Adam Godwin (2017) Make sure you download the 20 Lesson GCSE Hinduism Unit for ‘Beliefs, Teachings & Practices’! System Requirements: Microsoft Office (PowerPoint & Word) Printing (for the worksheet) 512MB Ram 1.5GHZ Processor
godwin86
8 of 8: Jobs in publishing

8 of 8: Jobs in publishing

Chapter 8 of 8: Jobs in publishing KS2: Inferring meaning from evidence, roleplay, heroes, calculating printing costs, planning a project (Reading, Maths, Careers) KS2, KS3: Our readers’ questionnaire was part of the initial evaluation of Freedom City Comics. It’s also a good reading and discussion activity in its own right! (PSHE, English, Maths) This is one section of our larger Freedom City Comics learning framework. To download all resources in one file, please see https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/freedom-city-comics-learning-framework-11919380 This learning framework and resources are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC). You can change this framework and share it with other people as long as you credit our project, but you can’t use it commercially. All artwork remains the copyright of the original artists. KS2 curriculum links include: Science, Art, Citizenship, History, Politics, Writing, Literacy, Reading, Maths, Geography, Drama, Careers, PSHE. Key Stage 2 learning framework developed by Mike Thompson and Lydia Wysocki. KS3 curriculum links include: Media, Art, English, Modern Foreign Languages, History, Drama, PSHE, RE/Ethics, Geography, Maths. Key Stage 3 learning framework developed by Gary Bainbridge and Lydia Wysocki. Freedom City Comics is our free comics anthology presenting snapshots of the history of civil rights and politics on Tyneside. It was created as part of Freedom City 2017. Thanks to all our Freedom City Comics contributors: • Paul Peart-Smith, working with alumnus Paul Barry and researcher Brian Ward • Terry Wiley, working with researcher Rachel Hammersley • Patrice Aggs, working with researcher Brycchan Carey • Mack Chater and Ian Mayor, working with researcher Joan Allen • Sha Nazir, working with researcher Matt Perry • Ragavee Balendran, working with researcher Matt Perry • ‘Brick’, working with project lead Matthew Grenby • Managing editor is Britt Coxon; Editor in chief is Lydia Wysocki.
lyd_w