The Ontological Argument OCR 2017 A Level (Arguments based on reason)

The Ontological Argument OCR 2017 A Level (Arguments based on reason)

In this highly differentiated lesson, students will challenge themselves to work out the Ontological argument put forward by Anselm and the criticisms from Gaunilo. They will also be able to evaluate the criticism from Gaunilo. It's all ready for the NEW 2017 OCR Religious Studies A Level. The lesson has a focus on independent learning and student-led activities. Included are all of the resources, a powerpoint and a detailed lesson plan. Just add chocolate! Notes: The card sort runs over three pages and needs to be printed onto green, yellow and red card. The first page should be printed onto green, the second onto yellow and the third onto red. This means students can choose their level of challenge by the traffic light colours. Answer to the quiz: BCCABCACB
toddbeamish
40 x question of the week

40 x question of the week

this resource can be displayed as a display, used as homework, starters, morning work, science research, extra challenges, speaking and listening tasks and many other options. there are 40 though provoking question cards - more than enough for 1 per week for the whole school year.
erylands
Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

Introducing the different areas of philosophy and explaining how they link to the 2014 AQA syllabus. Ends with an introduction to Epistemology "what is real?" card sort.
GWestrep
lateral thinking question ppt

lateral thinking question ppt

this lateral thinking is great for end of term or end of year class fun. it has different brain teasing questions which would get the pupils. these requires students to use their understand skills and knowledge. it brings the class together. ideal for year 5 and 6
miss_teacher_123
Indirect Realism

Indirect Realism

Used in conjunction with Russell's Problems of Philosophy Ch2 to briefly explain Indirect Realism as a theory, and consider what the initial problems with it may be. Activity recreating Plato's cave.
GWestrep
Design argument Knowledge Check Sheet AFL

Design argument Knowledge Check Sheet AFL

A series of questions to consolidate learning on the teleological argument. Students rate their own understanding out of 10, comment upon areas they need to review and finally the teacher also assesses their understanding for mark book purposes. These AFL sheets could be used as homework tasks to consolidate learning. It allows you to easily identify common misunderstandings in the class quickly before moving on to new information.
samueljames87
A Level Skills: Deviance & Rule Breaking

A Level Skills: Deviance & Rule Breaking

To behave deviantly is to behave differently from the norm. It is not just about breaking the rules or behaving criminally. This task is about deviance in terms of norms and expectations; Behaving and thinking differently. The students have been conditioned to behave in a certain way for most of their school life. Students are often encouraged to conform and behave passively but within higher education and business this often hinders success. Ofsted claim that an outstanding lesson should be one in which students ‘learn intuitively, encouraging each other to explore, inquire, seek clarity, take risks and think critically and imaginatively’. Having an element of deviance in your students encourages all of these skills. Activity Aims: 1. To get the students to think differently and see the merit of deviant behaviour when solving problems 2. For the students to challenge their own preconceived ideas and processes
IQResources
3 Engaging Simulations For Discussion & Debate

3 Engaging Simulations For Discussion & Debate

Teachers’ Notes: These fun and engaging simulations are designed to stimulate critical thinking and reasoning and develop argument and persuasion skills in students. Each scenario is open to interpretation, and students will love debating each other and putting their opinions forward. N.B. Intellectually, these resources are appropriate for students in grade 6 and above. However, some scenarios touch on (mention) themes that could be considered offensive, controversial, or inappropriate. These themes include: crime and punishment (including drugs and murder), religion, obesity, gun ownership, terrorism, PTSD, and war. Please be aware of this if you teach a potentially sensitive or conservative cohort. ***Clicking on the preview and zooming in will allow you to see the content if you are concerned*** Simulation One: Journey to Mars Simulation Two: Desert Island Game Simulation Three: Clemency
LanguageArtsLab
Beginners Philosophy

Beginners Philosophy

'Teach philosophy in primary schools,' says academic. Professor Angie Hobbs believes just one philosophy class a week would benefit children’s intellectual and social development. (The Telegraph 12th March 2015 N. Ackerman) This resource is a dynamic, engaging and pupil focused introduction to philosophy. Proper philosophy but without the jargon. Designed for older primary age children (approx aged 10 and up) but also suitable through secondary school and as an introduction at post 16. Introduction to asking questions then explore three big themes in philosophy using dilemmas and thought experiments. Can be enjoyed and accessed on many levels all of which are discussion based. - 31 slide philosophy power point. - Detailed teacher guide with 'master class' insights and teaching prompts. Great as enrichment or part of a theme. Written by a philosophy graduate, experienced teacher and mum of two young boys who like to ask questions!
MJBee