FAQ for teachers transitioning to international roles

Visa

How do I get a visa

Typically you should expect your school to organise your visa for you. They should be knowledgeable about all your visa requirements including qualifications needed, any restrictions, eligibility of dependents etc. If a prospective school does not have this information, be wary.

Often most or all of your visa expenses are paid for or reimbursed to you. Ask the school about this.

Age restrictions are typically in place for those 60 years and over.

Expenses and benefits

How often will I be flown home? Typically, what do packages that schools offer contain in terms of medical cover, return flights, initial airfare being paid, etc?

Flights are dependent on the school, often this is provided or reimbursed at the beginning and end of contract. Some offer annual return flights.

Other benefits including insurance, accommodation etc vary widely depending on the school and region. You should feel comfortable asking a school what support they provide.

European schools don’t tend to offer the sorts of comprehensive packages that you might expect from school further afield.

Will my children be able to attend the school I teach in?

Children being able to attend often depends on the type of school, for example bilingual schools for local children may not be appropriate.

Application processes

In which country do you get the most jobs?

We see the bulk of roles in Middle East, with a large number of UK curriculum schools, and Asia, with a wider mix of curriculum. Part time roles are less common, or less likely to be advertised internationally. We do see maternity cover roles and some shorter term contracts.

Skype interviews are common, particularly in the first instance. Face to face interviews are available at job fairs, which typically fall in January of the previous school year.

Is this just for full time jobs or are there part time roles too?

Part time roles are less common, or less likely to be advertised internationally. We do see maternity cover roles and some shorter term contracts.

Will it be a Skype interview?

Skype interviews are common, particularly in the first instance. Face to face interviews are available at job fairs, which typically fall in January of the previous school year.

Is my CV good enough?

Interviews and CVs are similar to for UK roles. Schools look for consistency, demonstrated responsibilities, and extracurricular commitments. International schools often ask for a professional photo and might need to know your marital status and accompanying dependents.

 

How likely is it that my partner will get a job in the same school?

Some schools favour teaching couples, but this can depend on vacancies available in any given year.

Qualifications

What qualifications are required to work in different parts of the world?

Depending on the region you may require a specific degree, teaching qualification and years’ experience. This is often a reflection of national visa requirements.

More and more international school can support NQTs to complete their induction year.

http://aobso.uk/newly-qualified-teachers/

http://aobso.uk/list-of-bsos/

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/induction-for-newly-qualified-teachers-nqts

 

If a school is not included in the list and they do offer you a role as an NQT, be aware that your time teaching will not count towards your teaching experience in the UK.

Overseas teachers in the UK – look into obtaining QTS. If you are not eligible for QTS, it will be more of a challenge to secure a position in a UK school.

Can I teach Primary and Secondary in (name of country) and what qualifications do I need for both?

Typically secondary teachers can teach in primary schools, but primary teachers do not teach upwards. Most international schools are all through schools and have a large number of subject specialist teachers.

Teaching in America / Canada

What support / advice can you give teachers who want to teach in countries where Tes don’t have roles?

There are a small number of international schools in the US. Our managed services arm mainly help teachers into roles in schools in non-English speaking countries. Check the Tes website and forums.

Teaching in Australasia

Is there a service for teachers who want to work in Australian or New Zealand?

Tes have partnered with Smart Teachers who have a large presence and knowledge base in Australia.

After opting in to be contacted about relevant roles

I've signed up to be contacted about relevant international roles. What now?

Should a role come up that matches your criteria, someone from the International Talent Team will be in touch to see if it’s right for you.

Contacting candidates can depend on the vacancies we have available. Don’t promise them we will be in contact. (Searchable notes should help with this)