Skip to main content

Bidding process for Institutes of Technology launched

Education secretary Justine Greening also launched a consultation on the design of the new T levels, focusing on how work placements can be delivered

News article image

Education secretary Justine Greening also launched a consultation on the design of the new T levels, focusing on how work placements can be delivered

The bidding process for establishing Institutes of Technology  (IoTs) was today formally launched by education secretary Justine Greening. This came as the government also published a prospectus on the institutes, which it said would set out the government's plans, along with "why we need them and who can get involved in their development".

In her speech at the Skills Summit this morning, Ms Greening invited bids for a share in the £170 million the government pledged for the creation of the new institutes. The IoTs will, according to the government, be collaborations between employers, FE colleges and universities; specialise in science, technology, engineering and maths; and provide students with “prestigious qualifications that are highly sought after by local employers”.

In her speech, Justine Greening said the government was determined to work in partnership with business to provide them with opportunities to match the talent across the country. She added: “That is why this government is investing billions in technical education and why today I am calling on employers to bring their innovation, creativity and commitment to technical education reform. Only employers can provide the work placements and apprenticeships that make these reforms a success.”

T level consultation

Plans to launch a consultation on the design of the new T levels were also announced at the summit, with the government seeking views on how to work with businesses to deliver work placements as part of its reforms to deliver T Levels. The rollout of the first seven Skills Advisory Panels in regions across England to help identify the skills needs was also announced, along with the full list of panel members to help create the content for the new T levels.

The Skills Summit, held at the Department for Education (DfE) and supported by the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), aims to bring together leading employers to help spearhead the government’s skills reform programme.

CBI director General Carolyn Fairbairn said: “There has never been a more important time to move beyond saying skills matter and deliver real change. Government and business must work together to ensure people have access to great careers and the needs of our economy are met.

“Immediate priorities include adapting the apprenticeship system and making the new T-levels a success.  Today is an important milestone in enabling firms to shape training and the [DfE] to hear their views directly - the start of a renewed partnership.”  

And David Hughes, chief executive of the Association of Colleges (AoC), said: “This consultation on T Levels is an important step forward in helping to develop a technical and professional education system in England that matches the best in the world as our country becomes more self-sufficient in skills, giving more young people the transition into working lives that they deserve. The AoC is strongly committed to working with employers and government to ensure this is a success.”

Want to keep up with the latest education news and opinion? Follow Tes FE News on Twitter, like us on Facebook and follow us on LinkedIn

 

Log in or register for FREE to continue reading.

It only takes a moment and you'll get access to more news, plus courses, jobs and teaching resources tailored to you