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Doing lines

TV's comedy improvisation show Whose Line Is It Anyway? reminds me of games I have adapted for the classroom

TV's comedy improvisation show Whose Line Is It Anyway? reminds me of games I have adapted for the classroom

TV's comedy improvisation show Whose Line Is It Anyway? reminds me of games I have adapted for the classroom.

Pupils are given an unusual item and must incorporate it in a brief scene. Your class can take turns improvising, using a variety of well chosen objects.

Or, using a group of four pupils, designate one as the party host, while the others are guests who have hidden professions or quirks that the host must guess from their acting. Pupils love inventing these secret identities.

A group of pupils can also improvise a scene on a given subject. The twist comes when one pupil can only speak in sentences of two words, another must use three, etc

Paul Warnes is a supply teacher in Kent.

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