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Flatpack empire with a work ethic

The news just in from Adelaide, south Australia, is that the city's branch of Ikea, the Swedish furniture store giant, has "adopted" six local schools

The news just in from Adelaide, south Australia, is that the city's branch of Ikea, the Swedish furniture store giant, has "adopted" six local schools

The news just in from Adelaide, south Australia, is that the city's branch of Ikea, the Swedish furniture store giant, has "adopted" six local schools.

The idea conjures up visions of plastic classroom chairs being replaced by stylish new sofas, and teachers forced to trail round windowless maze-like warehouses in search of the staffroom.

The reality is a little more prosaic. By adopting the schools, the Swedes have allowed pupils to take part in an Australian government initiative designed to allow them to see first-hand how a workplace works.

"It's a terrific way to educate them about potential jobs to pursue in the future," explains Elle Winter, human resources manager at Ikea in Adelaide.

But what's in it for teachers? Well, I suppose there ought to be plenty of inspiration around for assembly.

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