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Majority of teenagers have cried due to exam stress, poll finds

The findings of the new survey come as thousands of pupils sit GCSE and A-Level exams

Academic warns there is a trade off between effective learning and pupils wellbeing

The findings of the new survey come as thousands of pupils sit GCSE and A-Level exams

More than half of teenagers admit they have cried because they are "stressed out" by exams, according to a new poll.

It also suggests that 48 per cent of the teenagers polled agreed they felt so anxious before sitting a paper that they thought they would be sick.

Thousands of youngsters across the UK are now taking exams for GCSEs and A levels.

The survey of 1,000 16 to 17-year-olds, published by the National Citizen Service (NCS), revealed that 51 per cent of those questioned said they had cried due to exam stress.

A gender breakdown shows that almost three in ten (29 per cent) male pupils admitted they had felt this way – along with 73 per cent of girls.

In addition, 51 per cent said they have felt so anxious before an exam that they thought they could not do it: 39 per cent of boys agreed with this, compared with 63 per cent of girls.

Testing times

Around 48 per cent of the teenagers polled agreed they felt so anxious before an exam that they thought they would be sick (34 per cent of boys and 61 per cent of girls).

The NCS said it was working with mindfulness expert Danny Penman to give teenagers and their parents practical help on easing stress during exam season.

Dr Penman said: "I discovered mindfulness when I was a stressed-out student. What I discovered is that mindfulness can help you cope when life seems overwhelming, whether you're a teen sitting exams or a parent who is deeply concerned about your son or daughter.

"The simple steps we're sharing at ncsyes.co.uk can easily be incorporated into daily life and can help break the cycle of anxiety, stress, unhappiness and exhaustion at exam time or when results are looming."

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