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Model behaviour

A question about early socialisation in the Higher paper allowed pupils to show off their knowledge of cases like that of Genie, an American girl who was tied to a potty chair for more than a decade

A question about early socialisation in the Higher paper allowed pupils to show off their knowledge of cases like that of Genie, an American girl who was tied to a potty chair for more than a decade

A question about early socialisation in the Higher paper allowed pupils to show off their knowledge of cases like that of Genie, an American girl who was tied to a potty chair for more than a decade.

"The question was about deprivation and privation. The cases are disturbing, but interesting," said Rachel Auchnie, a psychology teacher in North Berwick High's religious, moral and philosophical studies department.

Overall, Ms Auchnie felt this year's Higher exam was "fair, representative of the course and appropriately challenging". The question her pupils struggled with was the essay in Section C, worth 20 marks. It asked pupils to describe atypical behaviour - abnormal behaviour such as schizophrenia - using the medical model. "It was very specific, given they studied about five different models," she said. "At Higher you expect challenging questions."

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