More than 30,000 pupils absent as a result of Covid-19

New data shows trends of coronavirus-related absences of staff and pupils in Scottish schools

Emma Seith

More than 30,000 pupils absent as a result of Covid-19

Covid-19 data released by the Scottish government this week shows:

30,824 
Pupils not in school for Covid-19-related reasons on Tuesday 17 November – the highest figure recorded on any day since the schools went back after the summer holidays, barring 10 November when the number of pupils off as a result of coronavirus hit a high of 31,276.

27,014 
Pupils who were not in school because they were self-isolating on 17 November; 714 were not in school as a result Covid-19-related sickness.

2,645 
Staff who were absent as a result of Covid-19-related reasons on 17 November, of which 1,615 were teaching staff and 1,030 were other school-based staff; for comparison, on 13 October, 1,747 school staff were absent for the same reasons.


Also today: 'Tiered Covid action an almighty headache for schools'

Background: Severest Covid restrictions to cover much of Scotland

Also this week: Scottish Parliament backs call for extra 2,000 teachers


89.2% 
The attendance rate in local authority schools that day (6.5 per cent of absences were for reasons not related to Covid-19, and 4.4 per cent were for Covid-19-related reasons). The lowest rate recorded since the summer was 84.2 per cent on 28 August.

92.1%
The attendance rate in primary schools on 17 November.

85.3%
The attendance rate in secondary schools on 17 November.

87.5%
The attendance rate in special schools on 17 November.

84.3%
The attendance rate for pupils in 20 per cent most-deprived areas of Scotland – against 93 per cent in the least-deprived areas – on 17 November.

45 
Childcare services closed for a Covid-19-related reason on 17 November; 89 were at risk of closing.

The Scottish government's Covid-19 Education Recovery Group publishes weekly infographics on data relating to school pupils and staff. The latest update was published today.

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Emma Seith

Emma Seith

Emma Seith is a reporter for TES Scotland

Find me on Twitter @Emma_Seith

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