Skip to main content

No doom and gloom

This year's Standard grade papers were greeted enthusiastically by Dollar Academy modern studies teacher Irene Morrison, with no sign of past problems

This year's Standard grade papers were greeted enthusiastically by Dollar Academy modern studies teacher Irene Morrison, with no sign of past problems

This year's Standard grade papers were greeted enthusiastically by Dollar Academy modern studies teacher Irene Morrison, with no sign of past problems. She was pleased with the positive spin put on questions.

In the Credit paper, for example, candidates were asked why there were more woman representatives in the Scottish Parliament than at Westminster; previously, there would have been more focus on why women were under-represented. "If every time you come to your class you're studying negative things, it has an impact," said Mrs Morrison, who believes pupils' enthusiasm is sapped by constant "doom and gloom".

She was encouraged to see questions broken down into digestible chunks. Another Credit question asked which of two election candidates was better qualified for office. In the past, this might have been presented as one block question, but this time it was divided into different parts - making it easier to see how marks were apportioned.

Mrs Morrison was also pleased to see the use of images at General level.

She finds it ironic that, following the best modern studies papers in years, Standard grade's future is limited, following the recent Scottish Government announcement about changes to the exam system. "It's a shame it's disappearing," she said.

Log in or register for FREE to continue reading.

It only takes a moment and you'll get access to more news, plus courses, jobs and teaching resources tailored to you