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Pupils see staff in radically new light

Avir Ahmed, 16, of Lyndon Humanities College in Birmingham, watched the teachers march through the city

Avir Ahmed, 16, of Lyndon Humanities College in Birmingham, watched the teachers march through the city

Avir Ahmed, 16, of Lyndon Humanities College in Birmingham, watched the teachers march through the city. "It's kind of weird seeing them all out here because you never think teachers would actually do this," he said. "They look different from how you see them in class. I don't really know what it's about, but I'm just happy the strike is on because I get a day off."

Teion Douglas, 4, went shopping in Birmingham with his mother, Cassandra, who said: "Nurses and firefighters - they save lives, they risk their lives, but they don't go out on strike. They're needed too much. The teachers' strike is inconvenient for me, but Teion says he doesn't want to go to school today anyway."

Daniel Cocks, 16, of Dame Elizabeth Cadbury Technology College, watched his teachers march by in Birmingham. "I'm worried about my GCSEs," he said. "I need some help with my revision, especially English, but I can't because they're all out here. I think the strike's wrong. They should be happy with what they've got - I certainly would be."

Abigail Adams, 10, of Betty Laywood Primary in Kent, accompanied her teacher mother to the London rally. "We can catch up with lessons easily," she said. "Teachers should be able to strike like people in other jobs."

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