9th September 2010 at 13:33
The TES launched in 1910 in the throes of a schools revolution. 100 years on, there's another education revolution on the way and the TES is still here reporting the news to the education community. Our centenary celebrations will run for the next 12 months with weekly canters through our archives and a monthly look at a topic that has been constantly debated over the years. This page will be updated every week; bookmark it now so you can check out the latest centenary articles.

Read the first issue of the TES

We've digitised the first issue of the TES, published with The Times on 6 September 1910. It's a great read, here are just a few choice quotes. In an article about public schools the author states that "every year the schoolmaster becomes a more dwarfed and puny breed." He further comments that the "profession today holds out only the poorest prospects.Nobody seems much concerned if teachers remain in penury." How much has changed over the last 100 years!
Read the first issue of the TES

100 years of the TES

TES editor Gerard Kelly muses on a fascinating century of upheaval and Michael Shaw charts the paper's story so far.
Read 100 years of the TES

The TES: indespensible or pandering to teacher angst?

Two distinct views of the TES. Luminaries including Michael Gove, Ed Balls, Sir Tim Brighouse and Jilly Cooper all agree that as we turn 100, the paper has never been in better health. While Chris Woodhead remains unimpressed with thepaper's progress over the last century.

The 80s and 90s - the most turbulent time for schools

Patricia Rowan, editor of the TES from 1989 to 1997, presided at the paper over the most turbulent period ever in education history.
Read Patricia's memories of the 80s and 90s.

Let's banish the back foot and set agenda for next century

Geoff Barton, headteacher of King Edward VI school in Bury St Edmunds, wants teachers to set the agenda for the next century.
Read Geoff's opinion piece

Progress would stun class of 1914

Primary headteacher Mike Kent looks at the changes in his school through the century.
Read Mike's column

Assessment through the century

Gerald Haigh romps through the paper's coverage of assessment through the last 100 years.
Read assessment through the century

Teaching in 1910: when teachers and taught were sworn enemies

By 1910, teaching had been liberated from the restraints of the Victorian era and the profession was undergoing enormous change. But commentators fretted as historian Jacob Middleton explains.
when teachers and taught were sworn enemies

From hooligans to hoodies

The media has sought to blame teachers for `declining' standards of behaviour among the young for a century or more.
Read Michael Shaw's article

The test of time

You could be forgiven for thinking that the obsession with exam performance is a modern phenomenon but The TES of 100 years ago gave voice to precisely the same preoccupations.
Read Michael Shaw's article

A class act

The public school system has been under fire since the turn of the 20th century, so how has it managed to survive - let alone thrive?
Read Michael Shaw's article

Constructive criticism

A school is more than the sum of its physical parts. But roofs, floors and walls (in some cases temporary and in others absent altogether) can have an enormous impact on learning experience.
Read Gerald Haigh's article

A force to be reckoned with

Women were a sizeable presence in schoolteaching from the start - they already outnumbered men by 1870. But, employers and politicians - and male colleagues - have been slow to accept them as professional equals. And then, as now, the top job was often out of reach.
Read Michael Shaw's article

Curriculum century

The current redesign of the national curriculum is only the latest in a long line of attempts to reach consensus on what children should be taught. And, as Michael Shaw reflects, last century as now, leaving teachers to get on with it has never been an option.
Read Michael Shaw's article

View TES Magazine's centenary pages here in PDF format

From the archive

September 6 1910 - The first ever edition of The TES was intent on taking `puny' schoolmasters to task. Readwhy public schools fail

May 7 1927 - Then, as now, disadvantaged underachievers finding solace in gang culture were causing concern. Read the craze for pleasure

July 16 1938 - On the eve of war, teachers worry about their duty to pupils in the event of an attack from the skies. Read air raid precautions - schoolmasters as wardens

August 11 1967 - The summer saw a sexual revolution in full swing, but headmasters kept their distance. Read sense of vacation

November 24 1950 - Women quizzed on domestic schooling thought they were ill-equipped to run a home. Read housewives on education: criticism of school

March 5, 1927 - Benefit of films such as the Hunchback of Notre Dame can be obtained unconsciously. Readhow cinema can fill our young folk with facts

January 6, 1978 - St John-Stevas calls for less theory and more practical classroom skills in teacher training. Read Tory big guns trained on young terrorists

16 October 1959: Education depends on high standards for trainee teachers, says chief education officer

Read `Soft options' in training: maths too low

TSL fundraising

Over the next 12 months, TSL and the TES will be raising money to build a school in Pakistan for some of the country's most disadvantaged children. We aim to raise pound;65,000 through a variety of fundraising activities for The Friends of The Citizens Foundation, a UK registered charity that raises funds and awareness for The Citizens Foundation (TCF) in Pakistan.

TCF was started 15 years ago in 1995 and is Pakistan's leading education charity. It builds and operates purpose-built schools in Pakistan to provide a modern, holistic and quality education at an economic cost, for disadvantaged children.

Find out more about donating


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