40,000 on fixed-term contracts

17th January 1997 at 00:00
More than 40,000 teachers in local authority primary and secondary schools are employed on fixed-term or temporary contracts.

Almost two-thirds of them work in primary schools, the most common age group is the under-25s and the overwhelming majority of them, 84.6 per cent, are women.

Less than a quarter of the recruits who applied for fixed term or temporary contracts in 1995 were men.

More than half of all fixed-term contract teachers are part-time. They are likely to be without responsibility points, and to be graduates, English teachers and in their first appointment.

In 1995, for the first time, full-time recruitment to fixed-term or temporary contracts fell from 69.3 per cent in 1994 to 60.4 per cent in 1995.

Turnover, meanwhile, dropped only slightly - just 0.5 per cent from 35. 8 per cent in 1994 to 35.3 per cent in 1995.

Eight out of 10 people who left temporary or fixed-term posts had been in the job for less than a year. Half of all those who resigned moved on to another education job within the LEA sector.

Leavers from secondary schools were most likely to have been English teachers.

Subscribe to get access to the content on this page.

If you are already a Tes/ Tes Scotland subscriber please log in with your username or email address to get full access to our back issues, CPD library and membership plus page.

Not a subscriber? Find out more about our subscription offers.
Subscribe now
Existing subscriber?
Enter subscription number

Comments

The guide by your side – ensuring you are always up to date with the latest in education.

Get Tes magazine online and delivered to your door. Stay up to date with the latest research, teacher innovation and insight, plus classroom tips and techniques with a Tes magazine subscription.
With a Tes magazine subscription you get exclusive access to our CPD library. Including our New Teachers’ special for NQTS, Ed Tech, How to Get a Job, Trip Planner, Ed Biz Special and all Tes back issues.

Subscribe now