On the board

26th May 2000 at 01:00
ANDY HUNT is a parent governor at Alma Park primary school in Levenshulme, Manchester. He has two daughters, one still a pupil at Alma Park. He retired from his job in a warehouse two years ago due to a serious illness, and has now recovered and is studying at college.

What made you want to be a

governor?

I was a member of the parent-teacher association and I always tried to go on school trips. Two years ago there were serious problems with the previous head being off for a long time. Parents felt they were not getting very far, with no feedback from the school so we took matters into our own hands and approached the governors.

Has the experience fulfilled your expectations?

What I found was much more serious, more involved in the running of the school. I'm chair of health and safety and premises, and involved in teachers' pay.

What dodon't you like?

I really like being involved in school but some politicking I find a bit annoying. A few people question everything that comes up in too much detail. We had long discussions in three meetings because a governor wanted battery expenses for lights on his bike. I said it would be greener to buy him a dynamo, but that didn't go down well!

Has the experience

changed you?

Yes it's made e more aware of health and safety issues. We've had a lot of trouble with trees, Railtrack and the main Manchester to London line.

What is the biggest, best or worst change you've seen

during your time as a governor?

Teachers' pay is a bit of a nightmare. It's a statutory duty for governors, but there's been no training yet except for the head and the chair.

What do your family think of your commitment?

My wife started as a governor at the same time as me. We compare training notes but not schools.

Where does governing fit into your life?

It takes up about 14 hours a month, but I am training at the moment. I fully expect it'll take even more time as I get into it!

If you could wave a wand,

what would you wish for

the school?

More resources. It's a wonderful school. We always have a Christmas concert with dancing and singing and signing too. (We have 15 hearing-impaired pupils.) My daughters can go up to people in the street and sign to them, it's marvellous.

And who or what would you make disappear?

We should work with people, not get away from them.

Who would be your ideal fantasy governor?

Sir John Harvey Jones, the businessman. He is able to adapt to most situations and put forward plans.


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