It doesn't suit you, Sir

10th August 2012 at 01:00

I have spent hours scouring the internet trying to buy my 14-year-old son a blazer. He is 6ft tall and has a 34in chest. Unfortunately, the average chest size for a boy his height seems to be 40in. His first blazer swamped him.

As a primary school teacher, and having witnessed the competition that can ensue on non-uniform days, I agree with school uniform and believe it is good for pupils. But I feel that parents of children who are different from the national average are penalised.

The government is keen to promote healthy lifestyles, but where does that leave the purchaser of school clothing when you have attempted to keep your children healthy and if their genetic make-up dictates that they are tall and slim?

I don't want to start buying men's suit jackets that are dry-clean only and I have found that slimmer sizes are out of stock for the more affordable ranges. This is surely something that many of us experience. Can anyone offer advice? School uniform manufacturers should also bear in mind that they could make money by offering a selection of width fittings across the height ranges.

Sheena Cook.

Log-in as an existing print or digital subscriber

Forgotten your subscriber ID?

Subscribe

To access this content and the full TES archive, subscribe now.

View subscriber offers

Comments

Get TES online and delivered to your door – for less than the price of a coffee

Save 33% off the cover price with this great subscription offer. Every copy delivered to your door by first-class post, plus full access to TES online and the TES app for just £1.90 per week.
 
Subscribers also enjoy a range of fantastic offers and benefits worth over £270:

  • Discounts off TES Institute courses
  • Access over 200,000 articles in the TES online archive
  • Free Tastecard membership worth £79.99
  • Discounts with Zipcar, Buyagift.com, Virgin Wines and other partners
Order your low-cost subscription today