Most parents have no idea what lies in store

3rd June 2005 at 01:00
Most parents have not been told about the changes to who teaches their child from this September, The TES survey reveals.

It shows that almost seven out of 10 schools have not yet informed parents, although many are planning to do so.

But a separate survey of 30 English education authorities found that 13 had sent leaflets or letters to parents. Eight were in the process of doing so, while nine were leaving it entirely up to schools.

John McNally, head of St Bernadette's primary, Birmingham, said:

"Birmingham council will be sending information to parents in the next few months. I think it is down to individual schools. The authority should not be messing around telling me what I should tell parents."

Councils such as Southampton, North East Lincolnshire, the London borough of Sutton and Essex say it is up to schools what they do.

Margaret Morrissey, spokeswoman for the National Confederation of Parent Teacher Associations, said: "The Government keeps telling parents to give, give, give but it doesn't think we're important enough to be informed about issues that are going to have or could have a significant impact on our child's education."

A spokeswoman for the Department for Education and Skills said: "Different schools will be implementing planning, preparation and assessment in different ways. It is for individual schools to keep parents informed."

In Gloucestershire, all schools were given a letter before Easter which they could send to parents when they thought appropriate. The letter explains that PPA time is long overdue in primary and special schools. It adds that because of the way government funding is calculated "our schools receive an average of pound;274 less per pupil than other schools in the country. So with funds already very tight, all of our schools are struggling to manage these changes within their budgets, whilst ensuring that children also benefit."

Mike Redman, Gloucestershire's remodelling adviser, said: "We didn't fudge the issue. We sent out a letter with the county council logo on so all heads could say this is not something their school has dreamed up, but it is a national scheme backed by the authority and the Government."

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