Technology can aid inclusion

1st October 2004 at 01:00
The Royal National Institute for Deaf People was pleased to read about the extensive use of information and communications technology made by Bob Overton, particularly for children with special educational needs (TES, September 10). We recognise the challenges of inclusion that his article discusses, but we are more optimistic about the possibilities of inclusion for pupils with SEN.

RNID supports the continuing role for specialist support services, which are crucial if inclusion in mainstream settings is to be successful. In addition, adequately-funded ICT provision has a major role to play in supporting students with special needs, particularly deaf students. RNID's publication, Using ICT with deaf pupils, explains a variety of ways in which ICT can be used in the classroom to benefit deaf pupils and suggests ways of delivering the curriculum using a range of new and established technologies.

RNID will continue to press for greater funding for ICT provision, which is essential to ensure the success of the Government's inclusion strategy.

Brian Lamb

Director of communications RNID

19-23 Featherstone Street London EC1

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