Tory council victors overturn cash cuts

16th May 1997 at 01:00
Newly-elected Tory shire councils are looking to give schools a multi-million pound boost, taking cash from other departments and reversing previously agreed cuts.

Hampshire's new Conservative masters led the way this week by agreeing to give schools an extra Pounds 2.2 million, overturning cuts by the former LabourLiberal Democrat administration.

In Cambridgeshire the Conservatives, who took the authority from a position of no overall control, have pledged a further Pounds 3m for schools.

In West Sussex the Conservatives, who gained 11 seats, are looking to give schools an extra Pounds 1.5m by reallocating money. Graham Forshaw, leader of the council, said: "It is early days but we are determined to give schools this money."

The Tories seized control of seven county councils in the May 1 local government elections - Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hampshire, Kent, Lincolnshire, Surrey and West Sussex.

John Sutton, general secretary of the Secondary Heads Association, said the decision by Tories in Hampshire to give schools extra money was "amazing" and added: "It is a real turnaround. It takes your breath away."

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