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Types of ghost

Poltergeists

These are blamed for unexplained noises, such as wall-banging, rapping, footsteps and music. They move possessions around, turn on faucets, slam doors, turn lights on and off, and flush toilets. They have been said to pull people's clothing or hair and, if you believe what you see in the movies, pull little girls into televisions.

Crisis apparition

These are visions of persons who, at the time of their appearance, are undergoing some form of crisis such as a severe illness, an injury or death.

False arrival apparition

People have been reported to hear and sometimes see another person arrive -usually half an hour or an hour or so before the person actually arrives.

Deathbed visions

A dying person has an awareness of the presence of dead relatives or friends. These are said to visit when death is near, to help the sick person "cross over to the other side".

Haunting ghosts

These almost always appear to be unaware of the people around them.

They also appear to be more connected with a place than with a human. The majority haunt alone.

Messengers

These spirits may be the most common kinds of ghost. Messengers usually appear shortly after their own death to people close to them. They are aware they have died, and can interact with the living. They most often bring messages of comfort to their loved ones, to say they are well and happy, and not to grieve for them. These ghosts appear briefly and usually only once.

Residual hauntings or recordings

Some ghosts appear to be mere recordings on the environment in which they once existed. These types of ghost do not interact with or seem to be aware of the living. Their appearance and actions are always the same. They are like residual energies that replay over and over again.

Projections

Some believe ghosts are all in our minds, or are products of our own minds. It is possible we can produce physical manifestations via powerful imagination, such as apparitions and noises - projections that others may even be able to see and hear.

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