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This is who I am

Colour is always an issue when it comes to painting, but in an art competition run by the Equality and Human Rights Commission, it applies also to race.

Colour is always an issue when it comes to painting, but in an art competition run by the Equality and Human Rights Commission, it applies also to race.

Colour is always an issue when it comes to painting, but in an art competition run by the Equality and Human Rights Commission, it applies also to race.

The UK contest hopes to emphasise the changing face of Britain - one in five pupils comes from an ethnic-minority and children are six times more likely to be of mixed heritage than adults.

Secondary pupils are invited to submit self-portraits that explore the complexity of their identity and background. "We want to inspire them to see self-portraiture as a powerful way to tell us who they are, and reveal how the next generation is starting to define itself," says Trevor Phillips, chair of the commission. "The testimonies and the art from 1,000 young people can reveal their experience of life in a way no desk research could."

Workshops have been held at Kelvingrove Art Gallery in Glasgow, and schools in Aberdeen, Dundee and Orkney. Steven Shankland, a BP Portrait winner, held a master-class at Machar Academy, while printmaker Elspeth Lamb worked at Stromness Academy.

An exhibition of 100 finalists will run at a London gallery.

Closing date is March 25.

Equality and Human Rights Commission

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