How To Train Your Dragon: Week 6 UnitQuick View
Lost_in_LearningLost_in_Learning

How To Train Your Dragon: Week 6 Unit

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Week 6 of my No-Prep, 6-week How To Train Your Dragon English teaching unit. This week’s focus is on character description, prediction and planning, writing and editing a sequel. How to Train Your Dragon is an incredible book to study, and this Chapter 15-19 unit pack helps to engage children in the text right from the start. With exciting, attractive and innovative worksheets designed to hook children in to the action from the get go, you can expect children to gain skills in using textual evidence to predict future plot lines, describing characters using ‘show not tell’ and writing at length. Included in this download: 1 week of planning included in page 2 of the PowerPoint for ease 41-page teaching PowerPoint that breaks down all worksheets & learning Key vocabulary break down for Chapter 15, 16, 17, 18 & 19 and topical words Video clips suggested to complement planning Integrated QR codes for children’s independence purposes Making Predictions worksheet Describing the Green Death worksheet Evidence from Text worksheet Book Review worksheet Story Mountain Planning worksheet Introduction Drafting & Editing worksheet Sequel Write-Up worksheet Front & Back Cover Design Challenge worksheet 5 x starter/extension activities on the PowerPoint slides to push higher ability How To Train Your Dragon clip art (not for commercial use) 2 fonts to edit your resources with PDF & Word Document versions of every resource Looking for the rest of the unit? X Week 1 X Week 2 X Week 3 X Week 4 X Week 5 **Want to save money on the whole unit? ** X How To Train Your Dragon - Full Unit I hope this resource saves you time and stress Happy teaching! Miss Austin
Dragons NotebookQuick View
martinesmith81martinesmith81

Dragons Notebook

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This resource can be used as a descriptive writing stimulus on the topic of dragons. The notebook containing exerts from Harry Potter and the Goblet by of Fire by J.K Rowling which describe dragons . It also uses examples from other texts which describe dragons. A lesson activity is included which asks students to name and describe a dragon. Extend the activity and ask students to draw their own dragon and then describe it.
Year 4 How to Train Your Dragon Complete Instructions Writing UnitQuick View
MissgillmoreMissgillmore

Year 4 How to Train Your Dragon Complete Instructions Writing Unit

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How to Train Your Dragon Instructions Writing unit. I created these resources to use for live lessons but likewise they would work well in the classroom. Included is a sequence of 8 lessons including exploring new vocabulary, sequencing events, describing a setting, using fronted adverbials, the big write lessons with modeled paragraphs and editing lesson. Here is a break down of each lesson included: Features of Instructions including an introduction to how adverbs, if conjunctions and using conjunctions as sentence openers. Adventurous vocabulary - introducing 6 new adventurous words and modeled sentences. Planning our instructions. Choose a dragon and look at his key features. What special care instruction would they need? Writing our first 3 instructions - how can we turn our notes into instructions. Modeled examples using how adverbs, if conjunctions and conjunctions as sentence openers. Writing our next 3 instructions - how can we turn our notes into instructions. Modeled examples using how adverbs, if conjunctions and conjunctions as sentence openers. Writing our next 3 instructions - how can we turn our notes into instructions. Modeled examples using how adverbs, if conjunctions and conjunctions as sentence openers. Writing an Introduction to match your instructions - including modeled paragraph. Finalizing your instructions. Using our knowledge of the features of instructions, how can we bring all of our work together and present them effectively? This unit was planned and used by me and is a great unit of writing to get children hooked and enthusiastic about How to Train your Dragon. Works really well alongside my Guided Reading lesson unit. All resources supporting this writing unit are included. My class loved this unit and enjoyed being really creative with designing their dragons and what types of personalities they might have.
How To Train Your Dragon Example Diary Text with Feature Identification & TemplatesQuick View
Helen-TeachHelen-Teach

How To Train Your Dragon Example Diary Text with Feature Identification & Templates

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Example diary entry text for How To Train Your Dragon written from the point of view of Hiccup, plus writing feature identification worksheet, and differentiated planning and writing templates. This exemplar text is perfect to use as a WAGOLL after reading the first four chapters of Cressida Cowell’s popular novel. The diary entry describes events that take place on Dragon-catching Day and is written from the point of view of Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III, the story’s protagonist. The diary text contains the following language, grammar and punctuation features: • Similes • Metaphors • Personification • Rule of three • Repetition for effect • Onomatopoeia • Alliteration • Hyperbole • Mainly past tense • Present tense (at the end of the diary) • Future tense (at the end of the diary) • First person • Exclamatory sentences • Questions • Fronted adverbials followed by a comma • Variety of nouns to avoid repetition • Noun phrases • Subordinating conjunctions • Apostrophes for contraction • Apostrophes for singular possession • Apostrophes for plural possession • Dashes • Colons • Semi-colons • Hyphens • Brackets Pupils can read the example diary entry, identify the features and then write one of the following, including appropriate features in their writing: ✽ Their own version of Hiccup’s diary entry ✽ A diary written by another character, such as Fishlegs, Snotlout or Gobber ✽ A diary entry for the next day (either without reading the subsequent chapters, therefore using prediction, or after reading the subsequent chapters) ✽ A series of diary entries for the following days The following resources are provided: • Example diary text • Feature identification sheet • Feature identification answers • Differentiated planning templates x3 • Differentiated writing templates x3 All resources are available as PDFs and easily editable Word documents. You may also be interested in: ✦ How To Train Your Dragon Character Profile Example Plus Feature Sheet and Templates ✦ How To Train Your Dragon Possessive Apostrophes Differentiated Worksheets Chapters 1, 2 & 3 ✦ How To Train Your Dragon Fronted Adverbial Differentiated Worksheets Chapters 1 & 2 ✦ How To Train Your Dragon Example Explanation Text with Differentiated Templates & Word Bank ✦ Iron Man 6 Example Texts Plus All Chapter Glossary BUNDLE Visit Helen-Teach’s Shop for more resources. All feedback is welcome and appreciated, so please leave a review after downloading my resources. Thanks!
George and the Dragon creative writing worksheetQuick View
HachetteSchoolsHachetteSchools

George and the Dragon creative writing worksheet

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This worksheet from Franklin Watts gives information about the historical character of St George, and about the George and the Dragon legend. It is based around the book George and the Dragon by Anne Adeney and Peter Kavanagh, in the Hopscotch Adventures series. The writing activity asks children to become a reporter and describe the dragon that brave George must fight. It aims to support the Pupil Writing Targets, encouraging children to use interesting language and to think about engaging their reader.
Dragon's Dinner colourful semantics. SENQuick View
SophieLR12SophieLR12

Dragon's Dinner colourful semantics. SEN

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Originally made for KS3 SEN class for students of pre key stage level (p scale). Sentences to go with each page of the book to describe what is happening. Images from the book or photocopies can be used to sequence parts of the story and describe what the character’s are doing. I have also included a template that can be used alongside images from the book to create a sentence, with the colours there as a guide for lower level students, or students new to colourful semantics. I have included a page of ‘little words’ or white words that can be cut up and slotted into the colourful semantics to create full sentences for students of a higher level. There are also communicate in print supports for adjectives that can be used for higher levels as well. Eg: The brave mouse climbed on the dragon’s tail.
The Dragon Slayer - Feelings GraphQuick View
bacaubacau

The Dragon Slayer - Feelings Graph

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Resource used with Year 3 as part of our inferencing a character’s feelings. We watched the dragon slayer and then described the hero’s feelings emphasizing the change in his emotions.
Dragons Display PackQuick View
Primary_Classroom_ResourcesPrimary_Classroom_Resources

Dragons Display Pack

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27 pages of resources to help support writing or topics on dragons. Many different uses, with vocabulary cards that can be used to help describe dragons, lots of pictures of dragons and dragon vocabulary cards.
Dragon Phonics Writing SheetQuick View
katewilliams_poetrykatewilliams_poetry

Dragon Phonics Writing Sheet

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This attractive dragon sheet has three describing words - red, hot, spiky, to be written over and copied below, as well as the title word - dragon to over-write. It’s fun to write words around a picture, especially dragon words! Yet the words are simple to sound out and clear to write over and copy, for children with a basic or partial grasp of phonics. The dragon - who’s flying over a castle - can then be coloured in. What other words could be used to describe a dragon? Able writers could add an idea or two of their own. Perhaps prompt for fiery, magic, mad, big, fast or kind. VIDEO: Dragon Writing: https://youtu.be/My4QvlCEOIw
Dragons Den - adjectivesQuick View
missmills1990missmills1990

Dragons Den - adjectives

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These fun, engaging and easily adaptable resources work through adjectives and agreements. They look at wacky inventions to get students engaged and involved. Use comparatives and superlatives alongside adjectives to describe these products. Students love the strange inventions people have come up with. To finish students will create a Dragon's Den style pitch to sell either one of the products you have been looking at or a crazy invention of their own. These resources encourage team work and speaking skills. There are a variety of activities you can use and change to suit your lessons or teaching styles.
Paper 1, Question 5: Creative Writing DragonsQuick View
AllthebellsandwhistlesAllthebellsandwhistles

Paper 1, Question 5: Creative Writing Dragons

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For GCSE English Language (AQA): Paper 1, Question 5. By entering the fantasy realm in this creative writing workbook, students will develop their imagination through making and creating a dragon. The resource supports character development, identifying language features, making inferences, improving vocabulary, describing using the five senses and other targeted activities related to dragons. The resource includes an extract from J R R Tolkien’s The Hobbit (Smaug’s lair) and exam-style questions. The end activity is a creative writing piece based on an image of a dragon. Learners can choose to describe the image or write the climax of a story titled ‘Peril’. The resources has been used on post 16-19 and adult learners. It is 9 pages long and could last the entirety of a 3-hour lesson. Enjoy! T.
Chinese Dragons Literature & CompositionQuick View
canadianwintercanadianwinter

Chinese Dragons Literature & Composition

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Here are six pieces of writing about Chinese Dragons, and six different writing assignments to go with them! Themes include: Dramatic Dragons, Foolish Dragons, Dragons in Mythical Tales, Dragons and the Seasons, and Dragons & Treasure! Writing assignments vary – from writing a clear summary to letting your imagination run wild, from describing dragon treasure to trying to imagine how a dragon could ‘fit in’ with your own cultural traditions. A traditional Chinese paper cutting of a dragon is included to be used as decoration on the student’s notebook. Stories are taken from anthologies of Chinese folktales. Literature & Composition collections are suitable for students who are ready to read and study different types of literature in small quantities. For example, instead of an entire novel or scholarly work, a small sample of each (which can stand on its own) will be presented. This way, the intermediate student has an opportunity to stretch their reading abilities without being discouraged. Each book contains six different writing samples which share a common theme. The writing assignments vary in length and are intended to inspire the student to try writing in different forms and styles.
Dragon Literacy Planning for Year 1/Reception. Quick View
fluffy30fluffy30

Dragon Literacy Planning for Year 1/Reception.

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A weeks plan linked to dragons, Children find signs of a dragon in the outdoor area, They then discover an egg and write about what it could be. A witness also spots the dragon so children write interview questions and then a report about what the witness saw.
How To Train Your Dragon: Week 5 UnitQuick View
Lost_in_LearningLost_in_Learning

How To Train Your Dragon: Week 5 Unit

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Week 5 of my No-Prep, 6-week How To Train Your Dragon English teaching unit. This week’s focus is on personification, rhyming poetry and text comprehension using evidence from the text. How to Train Your Dragon is an incredible book to study, and this Chapter 12-14 unit pack helps to engage children in the text right from the start. With exciting, attractive and innovative worksheets designed to hook children in to the action from the get go, you can expect children to gain skills in using personification to describe, writing rhyming poetry in the ABCB pattern and providing evidence when answering comprehension questions. Included in this download: 1 week of planning included in page 2 of the PowerPoint for ease 41-page teaching PowerPoint that breaks down all worksheets & learning Key vocabulary break down for Chapter 12, 13, 14 and topical words Video clips suggested to complement planning Integrated QR codes for children’s independence purposes Identifying Personification worksheet The Story So Far worksheet Personification in Poetry worksheet Rhyming Poem Example worksheet Poetry Write-Up worksheet Chapter 14 Comprehension worksheet Newspaper Article Challenge worksheet Evaluation challenges for children to give their opinions on each poetic form 5 x starter/extension activities on the PowerPoint slides to push higher ability How To Train Your Dragon clip art (not for commercial use) 2 fonts to edit your resources with PDF & Word Document versions of every resource Looking for the rest of the unit? X Week 1 X Week 2 X Week 3 X Week 4 X Week 6 **Want to save money on the whole unit? ** X How To Train Your Dragon - Full Unit I hope this resource saves you time and stress Happy teaching! Miss Austin
Character Writing Frame - Dragons - KS1 LiteracyQuick View
Tes_elementsTes_elements

Character Writing Frame - Dragons - KS1 Literacy

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KS1 Literacy - Character Writing Frame - Dragons This resource contains a series of writing frames to help pupils to describe their dragon character. Pupils can add the main adjectives to describe their dragon before writing longer descriptions. This is a great activity to develop pupils’ creative writing skills and can form the basis of a story writing task.