What Were They Like? - Conflict PoetryQuick View
alexxralexxr

What Were They Like? - Conflict Poetry

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A lesson that focuses on a poem from the conflict collection. The lesson includes: Starter Context Poetry analysis Language/Form/Structure analysis Themes and comparison questions ALL CONFLICT LESSONS OF THIS SOW ARE TO BE USED ALONGSIDE THE POETRY COMPARISON GRID (Free resource)
Homophones: Where, Were, We're, WearQuick View
KrazikasKrazikas

Homophones: Where, Were, We're, Wear

(0)
This resource contains: 1. A fully editable 50-slide PowerPoint lesson on the National Curriculum Year 2 commonly confused homophones / near homophones where / were / we're / wear. The resource explains the meaning of the homophones and examples. A variety of opportunities are provided for pupils to choose the correct homophone. 2. An information sheet that explains the meaning of the homophones and when they are used with examples. 3. Seven worksheets in which pupils have to select/compose/correct sentences using the correct homophones. This resource is appropriate for year 2 pupils and older SEN students. You may also be interested in: Where Were Wear We’re - Memo Mat More Homophone Resources Thinking of publishing your own resources or already an author and want to improve your resources and sales? Check out this step-by-step guide: How to Become a Successful TES Author: Step-by-Step Guide
Colourful Semantics: We're Going on a Bear HuntQuick View
marmalade17marmalade17

Colourful Semantics: We're Going on a Bear Hunt

(1)
We’re Going on a Bear Hunt colourful semantics! Great for speaking and listening and/or writing intervention, these cards help struggling speakers and writers to retell a familiar story, giving them more confidence when they write. A brilliant tool to support children with EFL - ESL - ELD - EAL - SEN! Colourful semantics is an approach created by Alison Bryan. It is a great way to support children who struggle to write independently. The cards help children to: •Develop a wider vocabulary •Make sentences longer •Develop use of nouns, verbs, prepositions and adjectives •Improve story telling skills This pack contains story specific vocabulary, including: 9 who - noun/person cards 18 doing - verb cards 13 what - noun/object cards 5 where - noun/place cards 18 how/when - preposition/adverb cards 18 adjective cards 9 different strips to structure sentences
Using Was/Were and I/MeQuick View
lampshade19lampshade19

Using Was/Were and I/Me

(0)
A Powerpoint to teach the rules for subject verb agreement using was and were and also extending into using the pronouns I and me correctly.
What weapons were used by the Vikings?Quick View
WayneWoodsWayneWoods

What weapons were used by the Vikings?

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This is a source-based activity consisting of drawings, primary and secondary documentary evidence and a photograph of an archaeological find. Students examine the evidence to answer short-response questions. the last activity is to write a half-page report on the weapons Viking used in battle. This activity is designed for students of the NSW History K-10 Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum. Stage 4 Depth Study 4: The Western and Islamic World The Vikings
Were the Romans civilised or barbarians?Quick View
georgiaperrygeorgiaperry

Were the Romans civilised or barbarians?

(0)
A lesson aimed at KS3 students that looks at whether or not the Romans can be considered as civilised or barbaric. Includes a card sort with differentiated activities for higher, middle and lower ability students to look at and sort out. Students will then write a supported conclusion to the key question using what they have learn in the lesson. Also included is an assessment using the new GCSE style of questions where students explain whether or not they agree with an interpretation of the Romans. Also includes a marking grid for students to be levelled.
The Black Death: What Were the Impacts?Quick View
markthegeographermarkthegeographer

The Black Death: What Were the Impacts?

(0)
Key Stage 3 Lesson which is approximately one hour long, but can be extended into two lessons. We start with a quick retrieval practice starter. The pupils then take part in a reading activity to set the scene for what post-plague England was like in 1350. We then look at the types of impact the plague had on England. The pupils are given various quotes about the impacts and they are asked to classify them in a number of ways including, social, economic, political, positive and negative, long-term and short-term. They also grade them according to their seriousness. We then briefly look at the Statute of Labourers 1351 before the pupils completing a podium analysis. Here the pupils arrange the types of people onto a podium to show who came out on top after the Black Death. In a nutshell the lesson includes: Retrieval practice starter Class reading activity Classifying the impacts activity using worksheet Discussion task using the Statute of Labourers 1351 Podium Analysis: Who benefited most after the Black Death Emoji Plenary. Hope this saves valuable planning time. https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/markthegeographer
Who were the Ancient Greeks?Quick View
PrimaryTopicShopPrimaryTopicShop

Who were the Ancient Greeks?

(0)
This resource introduces the Ancient Greek topic with brief reading passages about city-states, religion, language, the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic time periods and the legacy of Ancient Greece. Pages: 4 (including 1 answer sheet) Contents: 2 Information Handouts Cryptic Crossword This resource is a free introduction to our Ancient Greece bundle. Please take a moment to view our terms of use.
'What Were They Like?' by Denise LevertovQuick View
flabs84flabs84

'What Were They Like?' by Denise Levertov

(0)
This is a lesson on a poem which explores the consequences of the American attacks on Vietnam during the war. It features in the Edexcel anthology of Literature exam poems. It's particularly useful to compare to 'Kamikaze' by Beatrice Garland (AQA) or 'War Photographer by Carole Satyamurti (see my lesson on this in my shop). The lesson begins by asking students to comment on Vietnamese cultures based on images presented on the slide. There is then a slide which introduces them to the Vietnam war and then Denise Levertov as a poet. Students are then introduced to the 'WPSLOMP' method of analysing poetry which they can then apply in pairs before colour coding quotes which are examples of peaceful and violent imagery, as well as some more challenging devices. The ideas they pull together for this can then be explored as a class and the slides can be annotated by the teacher on the board and there are also some quotes colour coded as the answers. Students are then asked to think about structure and there is a slide which refers to the use of anaphora, alliteration and the overall effect of the poem's layout. The lesson ends with a chance for students to write independent essay paragraphs with Edexcel's exam success criteria but this can be adapted for your course. There are 3 options on how to approach essay writing: 'layers of meaning', PEA, or the 'reading ladder' which follow the same idea. There is then an opportunity to self or peer assess according to the key skills. As with all my lessons, there are 'Talk for Writing' activities and Challenge tasks for more able students. Attached is; - A powerpoint with the lesson clearly outlined - A copy of the poem with a word bank - A handout of glossary style word banks which students can stick into their anthologies - PEA style writing frames which can be cut out to support weaker students in their essay writing - Links to online videos/readings (see 'Notes' under slides). - A separate powerpoint with 2 suggested homework activities linked to this poem. If you like this resource, please review it!
Was or Were ?Quick View
PrimaryWowPrimaryWow

Was or Were ?

(8)
Was and were are the past tenses of verb "to be". 23 easy to read, child friendly sentences with missing were or was. 1- Identify the subject of the sentence. 2- Identify whether it is a singular or plural noun. 3- Fill in the blank in the sentences using ‘was’ or ‘were’ 4- Then on the line at the end write whether the noun was singular or plural. Also thrown in a very brief cloze PowerPoint.
Homophones: Where, Were, We're and WearQuick View
KrazikasKrazikas

Homophones: Where, Were, We're and Wear

(0)
This resource contains a set of 7 worksheets in which pupils have to select the correct homophone, compose sentences using the correct homophones and correct sentences containing the homophones were, where, we're and wear. The resource also includes an answer sheet and an information sheet on the homophones. This resource is appropriate for Year 2 pupils and older SEN students. You may also be interested in: Where, Were, Wear and We're - PowerPoint Lesson Save money and buy both resources at a discounted rate: Where, Were, Wear and We're - PowerPoint Lesson and Set of 7 Worksheets Where Were Wear We’re - Memo Mat More Homophone Resources Thinking of publishing your own resources or already an author and want to improve your resources and sales? Check out this step-by-step guide: How to Become a Successful TES Author: Step-by-Step Guide
What weapons were used during Medieval times?Quick View
Mrs_ScMrs_Sc

What weapons were used during Medieval times?

(0)
This lesson introduces the topic of weapons used during the Medieval period. The lesson consists of information cards along with images of a variety of Medieval weapons. Pupil are asked to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each weapon and order them in order of effectiveness in a pyramid style activity. Pupils then create weapons out of plasticine to create a Medieval art gallery.
What weapons were used in the English Civil War?Quick View
RavihensmanRavihensman

What weapons were used in the English Civil War?

(0)
A Dragons' Den-style activity for KS3 History, involving group work on some of the main weapons used in the English Civil War. Can be used to consolidate what pupils already know about the tactics used in key battles, and developments such as the New Model Army.
Why were they still using Galen by 1250?Quick View
sezbertsezbert

Why were they still using Galen by 1250?

(0)
This looks in depth at the main reasons why Galen was being used and has been designed to be used over two lessons, with a homework task given. The end result leads the pupils to look at completing an answer for Question 5 or 6 on the Edexcel 9-1 Paper One and includes pupil help and a mark scheme they can follow. I am sure you could adapt this for the other two exam boards. I have used the idea of hexagons put forward by Russell Tarr and would recommend that you have a look at his website as there are quite a few ideas there that are very useful! With the diagram of change I have included the various versions of the artwork so you can decide which one to use! Only one version has been included in the PPT.
Easily Confused Words - Were, We're and WhereQuick View
Online_Teaching_ResourcesOnline_Teaching_Resources

Easily Confused Words - Were, We're and Where

(0)
Easily Confused Words - Were, We’re and Where ‘Easily Confused Words - Were, We’re and Where’ is an engaging English teaching PowerPoint presentation designed to help pupils use these near homophones in the correct context. Content includes Definitions and examples of ‘were’, ‘where’ and ‘we’re’ Consolidation of understanding activity Peer assessment task An accompanying worksheet ‘Easily Confused Words - Were, We’re and Where’ is fully editable so teachers can adapt the resoure to meet the differing needs of each class they teach. To preview ‘Easily Confused Words - Were, We’re and Where’ in full and to view more English teaching resources please click here.
Who were the Vikings?Quick View
gammackgammack

Who were the Vikings?

(0)
Full lesson on the Vikings and who they were. Slide 1/2/3 - map of where the Vikings came from, how they came over, map of the route taken and why they came. slide 4 - farming and fighting Activity 1 - draw the routes of the Vikings on a map Activity 2 - complete sentences using key words given Activity 3 - Write an explanation about why the Vikings would settle in Britain Activity 4 - Write a letter to a family member back home explaining what Britain is like
What were the experiences of slaves?Quick View
Nadiyah123Nadiyah123

What were the experiences of slaves?

(3)
Ready to teach and includes differentiated work sheets. A source investigation into the experiences of slaves at different points in the Slave Trade triangle. I have used this as a carousel- style activity whereby students go on a "journey" within the classroom; from Africa to the Middle Passage to America; exploring sources at each point. All feedback welcome.