Norman Kings and the Catholic ChurchQuick View
MsMurrayHistoryMsMurrayHistory

Norman Kings and the Catholic Church

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I hope you like the resource, but either way, PLEASE REVIEW! This is a 5 minute video on the topic of Norman Kings and the Catholic Church. William I, William II, and Henry I are considered, the key aspects of their relationships with the church being outlined. For William, there’s a chance to pause the video and discuss how his actions benefited the crown as well as the church. Students might be encouraged to go and research topics raised in detail if this is their introduction to the topic, or to test what they know against the video’s themes if this is for revision. The visual prompts act as a good support to students, and give context to the long running issue of church vs state.
History of Britain: Population and ImmigrationQuick View
MsMurrayHistoryMsMurrayHistory

History of Britain: Population and Immigration

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I hope you like the resource, but either way, PLEASE REVIEW! This lesson follows on from my introductory ‘How History Works’ lessons, and begins a brief unit on the panorama of British History. I think it’s important for students to have a basic outline of key features of our country - population, governance and religion - so that they can appreciate and understand the historical periods they go on to study within that context - it’s essentially trying to create a basic wireframe to hang their acquired knowledge on. This lesson looks at population, considering rates, reasons behind and the likely impact of change. Tiered questions are available.
Natural Hazards: EarthquakesQuick View
MsMurrayHistoryMsMurrayHistory

Natural Hazards: Earthquakes

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These are a set of activity suggestions based around broadcast material available from the BBC. A series of ideas are given for you to mix and match which focus on the causes and effects of earthquakes, but more increasingly the management of this natural hazard. See resource outline for how the broadcasts could be used in or across lessons. I hope you like the resource, but either way, PLEASE REVIEW!
Elizabeth I and MarriageQuick View
MsMurrayHistoryMsMurrayHistory

Elizabeth I and Marriage

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I hope you like the resource, but either way, PLEASE REVIEW! This two minute video outlines the three main contenders for Elizabeth’s hand - Dudley, Philip II and Anjou. The various features of each suitor are referenced in factual terms (see attached script), with an animated sequence to match. This then leads on to a card sort activity, where students need to recall the key features by colour coding/sorting the cards to the right suitor, and then evaluate these by attaching the right evaluation cards. The activity as a whole could culminate in a debate, or essay practice.
Introduction to History: How History WorksQuick View
MsMurrayHistoryMsMurrayHistory

Introduction to History: How History Works

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I hope you like the resource, but either way, PLEASE REVIEW! This lesson is designed as an introduction to History. It asks students to consider the development of humans from prehistory to now, so that when they go on to study historical periods, they can pinpoint those correctly on this framework. It will prompt students to understand that life as we know it is a recent phenomenon, and that we’re only here because each new generation has built on the successes of the last. Lesson activities are differentiated on a bronze/silver/gold basis. Notes in the powerpoint explain each slide
History of Britain: ReligionQuick View
MsMurrayHistoryMsMurrayHistory

History of Britain: Religion

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I hope you like the resource, but either way, PLEASE REVIEW! This lesson looks at the evolution of religion overall and then considers the impact of Christianity on Britain. This is intended as an overarching and general introduction so that students can see how we have moved from being a very religious society, under essentially one faith, to a more secular nation. This will give them a suitable backdrop when they go on to study certain periods in more detail. Tasks are differentiated on a bronze/silver/gold basis, and the notes for each slide provide explanation and possible discussion points.
A Teacher's Guide to the TudorsQuick View
MsMurrayHistoryMsMurrayHistory

A Teacher's Guide to the Tudors

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This two pager gives you a summary on the main themes in the Tudor period. It’s not intended to give you the detailed evidence, but it does highlight things to look out for, trends to notice, and the shifts and changes that make the Tudor period one of our most important in historical terms. I hope it helps as a backdrop, giving you the panorama of the period, and hopefully a bit of a platform to ask tough questions of your students! I think this is best suited to someone teaching the Tudors for the first time, who wants to understand the big brushstrokes of the period before planning the detail in the lessons. The themes raised will be a challenge for students, so the summary may prompt some higher level activities and questions.
History of Britain: GovernmentQuick View
MsMurrayHistoryMsMurrayHistory

History of Britain: Government

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I hope you like the resource, but either way, PLEASE REVIEW! This is the second in a short series of lessons that outline key elements of British history. Students will take away an understanding of how Britain is governed at present, and that we have moved slowly to Parliamentary democracy. Key events in the history of government are examined, and the students are encouraged to make judgements about the turning points. Starting with teacher exposition, this lesson then moves to a paired card sort.
Introduction to History: How People in the Past LivedQuick View
MsMurrayHistoryMsMurrayHistory

Introduction to History: How People in the Past Lived

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This is a follow on from the previous 'How History Works' lesson. This is essentially a research lesson - students complete guided research in jigsaw groups, and establish and judge the key features of historical eras. This will help them understand the context for the historical periods they go on to study. Lesson guidance and advice regarding differentiation is available in the notes on each slide.