Contemporary history (1901 – Present Day) teaching resources: Cold War

Resources and ideas for history, contemporary history (1901 – present day), cold war, written by teachers to support teaching and learning

The Cold War: Was American involvement in Vietnam justified?

The Cold War: Was American involvement in Vietnam justified?

Students begin by watching a clip from Platoon, whereby they suggest adjectives to describe the impression given re American involvement in Vietnam. They are introduced to 5 different reasons for US action in Vietnam, which they have to link to a description for each reason and a supporting quote. They then decide which of the 5 factors were the main reasons for US involvement. They main activity is to create a script for a voice-over to either condemn or support US actions.

By planmylesson

Arab-Israeli Conflict (Palestine-Israel Conflict) Introductory Lessons

Arab-Israeli Conflict (Palestine-Israel Conflict) Introductory Lessons

Self-contained/fully resourced lesson activities to introduce/provide context to study of the Arab-Israeli Conflict Year 11 Modern history includes various learning activities including resources for display, learning activities and worksheets. Overview of history, ancestral claims/links of both groups, key people activities + key words activities and timelines- several lessons of work/homework and easy to follow. Fully editable Word version + a PDF version provided 61 pages each! Lots here for the small price.

By gcmem

Cold War KT1 knowledge test

Cold War KT1 knowledge test

A short knowledge test for Key Topic 1 for A-level History, Cold War in Europe.Answers not included, this is purely just questions. Please look at my other resources.

By bourne99

AQA History B Quiz Cards, over 60 questions.

AQA History B Quiz Cards, over 60 questions.

6 topics:Lead up to WW1, Post WW1 peace, Hitler's foreign policy and lead up to WW2, Weimar Germany, Hitler's Germany and Vietnam.If you use a double sided printer, you can cut the individual cards out, with the question on the front and answer on the back.

By pixel_nic

The Berlin Wall lesson bundle

The Berlin Wall lesson bundle

This resource consists of two lessons on the Berlin Wall:1) Why was a wall built to divide Berlin? This lessons introduces the reasons why the USSR built the Berlin Wall and also recaps the problems already encountered in Berlin between 1945-49. It introduces the topic through an excellent source and gets the students to think of what could have happened to explain that source.2) Who came out of the Berlin Wall incident the best? This lesson gets students to assess who came out of the incident the best by getting them to group a number of different consequences. After that they use their grouping to write an answer to the question using the writing frame on the Ppt. Finally, students recap the Berlin Wall issues by creating a poster to go onto the Wall from either a Soviet or American perspective showing different interpretations - developing these for their exams.

By matthew_nolan

A2 History AQA American Dream revision plan

A2 History AQA American Dream revision plan

An overview of the AQA Part 2 American Dream unit using detail from the specification inconjunction with other key content for students to revise. Students can assess how confortable their knowledge is on a topic and date the appropriate, sad, middle or happy face. The intention is then for students to use this as a base from which to start to plan and organise their revision effectively. The hope being that they have moved most of their learning on from the red unhappy face to the Green smiley face before they sit the exams.This is brand new and I am about to give it to my students for the first time this year. The AS version for them them was very successful last year and I intend to give them a copy of that again - as they will need both for the new style A level exams.

By slbarnes7

Berlin Blockade/Berline Crisis (For GCSE/A Level)

Berlin Blockade/Berline Crisis (For GCSE/A Level)

This simulation was created from scratch to teach Year 12 about the Berlin Crisis. They were split into 2 groups; USA and the USSR. This pack includes:Agenda - for you to edit Presentation 1- Master Presentation with a few instructions Simulation Documentation - to be printed for the simulation day Simulation Feedback sheets - simulation feedback sheets for you to edit and grade (there is a draft typed up as an example)Simulation Pack - Cover pages for both groups Berlin Crisis Simulation x2 - 2 different PowerPoints for the 2 groups as they should be in separate rooms! **It is strongly advised that students research their countries Post WWII (free lesson is also available from me for this)

By njani

New AQA GCSE History Revision Guide - Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950–1975: Part One

New AQA GCSE History Revision Guide - Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950–1975: Part One

Revision guide for the new AQA GCSE History specification Conflict and tension in Asia, 1950–1975. The revision guide specifically focuses on part one: Conflict in Korea. The topics considered are:• The causes of the Korean War: nationalism in Korea; US relations with China; the division of Korea; Kim Il Sung and Syngman Rhee; reasons why the North invaded the South in June 1950; US and the UN responses; USSR's absence from the UN.• The development of the Korean War: the UN campaign in South and North Korea; Inchon landings and recapture of South Korea; UN forces advance into North Korea; reaction of China and intervention of Chinese troops October 1950; the sacking of MacArthur.• The end of the Korean War: military stalemate around the 38th Parallel; peace talks and the armistice; impact of the Korean War for Korea, the UN and Sino-American relations.

By liam0001

Causes of the Cold War

Causes of the Cold War

This outstanding resource is designed to provide stretch and challenge for the more able students by promoting discussion and debate on the causes of the Cold War. It can be used as a starter, plenary or as a revision activity. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors to explain the causes of the Cold War. The document is provide in Microsoft Word so you can edit the resource if you wish to customise it further. Once students have cut the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons for the boom that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using what you think are the four most important events or factors that helped to cause the Cold War? At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The Cold War 1945 - 1955 Know: What were the causes of the Cold War? Understand: How did misunderstandings escalate to mistrust? Evaluate: Which were the most significant causes of the Cold War? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: The causes of the Cold War 1945 - 1955? Explain: How are the causes linked together? Analyse: Which were the most significant causes of the Cold War? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

AS AQA American Dream  revision plan

AS AQA American Dream revision plan

A break down for the AS AQA American Dream unit, using specification criteria and supported with key issues and events for greater context. Students can make a note where they feel their understanding of certain topics is, by dating under the red, yellow or green face. The idea behind this is so that students can see specific areas where they need to focus their revision; hopefully moving their learning all to the green smiley face by the time of the exam.This was an extremely useful resource for my students last year as they and I, were able to monitor their progress. I'm currently in the process of writing the new one for A2.

By slbarnes7

Diamond 9: What were the causes of the Cold War?

Diamond 9: What were the causes of the Cold War?

This outstanding resource is designed to provide stretch and challenge for the more able students by promoting discussion and debate on the causes of the Cold War. It can be used as a starter, plenary or as a revision activity. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors to explain the causes of the Cold War. The document is provide in Microsoft Word so you can edit the resource if you wish to customise it further. Once students have cut the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons for the boom that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using what you think are the four most important events or factors that helped to cause the Cold War? At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The Cold War 1945 - 1955 Know: What were the causes of the Cold War? Understand: How did misunderstandings escalate to mistrust? Evaluate: Which were the most significant causes of the Cold War? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: The causes of the Cold War 1945 - 1955? Explain: How are the causes linked together? Analyse: Which were the most significant causes of the Cold War? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

GCSE Edexcel Cold War bundle

GCSE Edexcel Cold War bundle

Includes fully resourced lessons on the Arms race, Berlin Blockade, Hungarian Uprising two lessons and the Berlin crisis up to 1961.Any questions please ask!Enjoy :)

By soniczzz

International Relations Revision Notes- A*

International Relations Revision Notes- A*

A collection of highly detailed revision notes, with precise and necessary statistics and facts which you need. As a result of this meticulous composition you are guaranteed to impress your examiner!The notes cover the inter war periods, between 1918-1939. The notes help demonstrate the consequences and effects of certain events as well as linking them to others.

By harroopb

Korean War revision flipped learning

Korean War revision flipped learning

A worksheet activity for flipped learning on the Korean War. Students answer questions based on a youtube video summary to help them revise/ consolidate their understanding of the Korean War.

By sannanorth

Diamond 9: How did domestic issues cause the 'Red Scare' in the USA during the 1950s?

Diamond 9: How did domestic issues cause the 'Red Scare' in the USA during the 1950s?

This outstanding resource is designed to provide stretch and challenge. It can be used as a starter, plenary or as a revision activity on how domestic issues helped to cause the 'Red Scare' in the USA during the 1950s. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors to explain how the domestic issues helped to increase the fear and mistrust of the USSR. Once students have cut the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons for the boom that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons.3. Make a smaller diamond shape using what you think are the four most important events or factors that helped to cause the Red Scare in the 1950s? At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Origins of McCarthyism Know: Which key domestic events helped to increase the fear and hysteria known as the 'Red Scare'? Understand: How did each event or issue help to ignite the hysteria of the 'Red Scare'? Evaluate: How far were domestic issues responsible for causing the 'Red Scare'? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: Why there was a 'Red Scare' in the 1950s? Explain: How did events at home helped to ignite the 'Red Scare'? Analyse: How far was were domestic issues responsible for causing the 'Red Scare'? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Diamond 9: How did domestic events help to cause the 'Red Scare' in the USA during the 1950s?

Diamond 9: How did domestic events help to cause the 'Red Scare' in the USA during the 1950s?

This outstanding resource is designed to provide stretch and challenge. It can be used as a starter, plenary or as a revision activity on how domestic issues helped to cause the 'Red Scare' in the USA during the 1950s. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors to explain how the domestic issues helped to increase the fear and mistrust of the USSR. Once students have cut the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons for the boom that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons.3. Make a smaller diamond shape using what you think are the four most important events or factors that helped to cause the Red Scare in the 1950s? At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Origins of McCarthyism Know: Which key domestic events helped to increase the fear and hysteria known as the 'Red Scare'? Understand: How did each event or issue help to ignite the hysteria of the 'Red Scare'? Evaluate: How far were domestic issues responsible for causing the 'Red Scare'? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: Why there was a 'Red Scare' in the 1950s? Explain: How did events at home helped to ignite the 'Red Scare'? Analyse: How far was were domestic issues responsible for causing the 'Red Scare'? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins