Greek teaching resources

Resources and ideas for Greek, written by teachers to support teaching and learning

Greek Myths: A week of Literacy lessons for UKS2 and above (all resources included!)

Greek Myths: A week of Literacy lessons for UKS2 and above (all resources included!)

This week of Literacy lessons focuses on developing children's understanding of Greek myths and gives them an opportunity to write a description of their own mythological creature. All of the classes who have been taught this week of Literacy have really enjoyed it, especially the boys!All lessons are fully resourced with differentiated handouts and smartfile presentations.Day 1: Reading and analysing examples of Greek myths.Day 2: Creating word banks to describe mythological creatures.Day 3: Using expanded noun phrases to describe mythological creatures. Day 4: Creating and planning their own mythological creature (with a bit of drawing included to keep them interested).Day 5: Children write a written description of their mythical creatures using the skills taught during the week.

By Klein100

Vocabulary Treasure Hunt

Vocabulary Treasure Hunt

A fun plenary or starter game for the main beginners' topics in any language. On each slide there are 16 squares with five treasures hidden behind them. Students translate the vocabulary on the boxes and if they get it right they choose a square and get a point/sweet/sticker if they find a treasure. This activity is based on the gamification theory that random rewards make games more addictive and fun.There are 34 slides with treasures hidden in different places about these topics (two slides for each topic) Numbers 1-20Numbers 20-100LettersAnimalsFamilyMonthsDatesAppearanceVerb endingsQuestion wordsSportsHobbiesHobbies/Sports and Time phrasesSubjectsDaysTownFoodNote: In presentation mode click on squares to make them disappear and reveal the treasures.

By jusch12

Ancient Greeks Intro / Gods and Goddesses SEN

Ancient Greeks Intro / Gods and Goddesses SEN

All resources developed for use with primary children with significant autism. Also suitable for KS3.Ancient Greek Intro - where was Ancient Greece? What does 'ancient' mean? What was the Greek alphabet?Gods and Godessess - Basic introduction, simple languageGods and Goddesess - Going to the TempleSimple comprehension - 2 versions, one is colour coded to support learners in finding the answers in the text.Describing Zeus - picture and word mat to support a writing activity (describing Zeus)Greek alphabet - activity

By jlp76

3D Bundle

3D Bundle

Using Sketchup and Sculptris (2 free pieces of 3D software) and these guides. Teach your children the basics of 3D sculpting.

By martinjgoulden

Prefix, Suffix, Greek and Latin Root Word Wall Bundle

Prefix, Suffix, Greek and Latin Root Word Wall Bundle

Prefix Suffix and Greek and Latin Roots Word Wall Bundle. In this zipped bundle you get the 4 in 1 word wall bundle of Prefixes, Suffixes, Greek Roots, and Latin Roots. There are 36 prefix word wall cards, 36 suffix word wall cards, 27 Greek Root word wall cards, and 33 Latin root word wall cards in this set. The definitions and illustrations are on each word card which makes this a great tool for memorizing the meaning of these roots and affixes. The illustrations are for visual learners to connect the roots and affixes to real life and to make sense of new and unfamiliar words. Just print, cut out and laminate the cards and use them as headers for doing ‘root of the day’ focus walls or use them as stand alone word walls. The prefixes are: mis, de, a, ab, abs, fore, tri, pre, re, dis, in, dif, semi, micro, ex, un, *im, sub, inter, pro, *im, tele, bi, super, under, uni/mono, bi/duo, tri, tetra/quad, quint/penta, sex/hexa, hepta/sept, oct, nona, deca, hecto, and kilo.* Note that the prefix ‘im-‘ has two meanings; one is ‘into’ and the other is ‘not’, so I have created two separate cards for the prefix ‘im-‘.The suffixes are: ous, ory, ly, ling, el, fy, ant, able, ible, ness, ess, ment, er, less, ence, ive, eer, ier, et, or, ism, ship, hood, ful, dom, ist, en, sion, ish, *al, acy, *al, ate, tion, ical, and esque.* Note that there are two different cards for the suffix ‘al’ because it has two different meanings.The Greek roots are: auto, bio, chron, dyna, gram, graph, hetero, homo, hydr, hypo, logy, meter/metr, micro, mis/miso, mono, morph, nym, phil, phobia, phon, photo/phos, pseudo, psycho, scope, techno, tele, and therm. The Latin roots are: ambi, aqua, aud, bene, cent, circum, contra, counter, dict, duc/duct, fac, form, fort, fract, ject, jud, mal, mater, mit, mort, multi, pater, port, rupt, scrib/scribe, sec/sect, sent, spec, struct, vid/vis, voc, fin/finit, and mob/mov/mot.TeacherNylaNyla's Crafty Teaching

By TeacherNyla

Greek Roots Word Wall

Greek Roots Word Wall

Greek Root Word Wall: This is an illustrated Greek Root word wall. Each Greek Root card has a matching picture with a short definition in brackets. It can be used as headers for doing ‘root of the day’ focus walls or it can be used as a stand alone word wall. Twenty-seven of the most commonly used Greek roots are used in these cards: auto, bio, chron, dyna, gram, graph, hetero, homo, hydr, hypo, logy, meter/metr, micro, mis/miso, mono, morph, nym, phil, phobia, phon, photo/phos, pseudo, psycho, scope, techno, tele, and therm. For Grades 4 and 5.TeacherNylaNyla's Crafty Teaching

By TeacherNyla

Ancient Greek Myths Tale of Two Spinners Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths Tale of Two Spinners Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths Tale of Two Spinners Assembly or Class PlayThis class play can be used as an assembly (for performance) or as a class play, to be read within the classroom. It is part of a set of scripts written on the Ancient Greek Myths which includes Guided Reading scripts plus quizzes. The poem - The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt - is included in the text.Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or downDuration - around 10 - 15 minutesSample Text:Narrator: Now, that’s better.(Ushering Incey Wincey Spider and Little Miss Muffet back to their seats) (To audience) You see how ridiculous this fear of spiders is? What do they call it? Arachn(Enter Arachne, scuttling on in spider costume)Arachne: Someone mention my name?Narrator: Ah! You’d be Arachne! As in Arachnophobia?Arachne: Well, I have no fear of spiders. I just am one! All thanks to(Enter Athene)Athene: Me!Arachne: Wretched goddess!(Athene scowls and raises her hand)Athene: (Menacingly) I’d be very careful what you say, if I were you Arachne! That tongue of yours has already got you into a whole heap of trouble!Arachne: (Gesturing at the spider outfit) Oh you mean this? Just because I said I was a better spinner than you!Athene: Foolish girl! What arrogance! You had to be punished!Arachne: That wasn’t quite the only reason I got punished, was it?Narrator: I’d say that was ample reason! Definitely too big for her boots, this one!Arachne: (Wailing) But I was brilliant at my craft.Athene: And didn’t you know it! You had to be taken down a peg or two.

By suesplays

Pandora's Box Assembly or Class Play

Pandora's Box Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths Pandora's Box Assembly or Class PlayThis class play can be used as an assembly (for performance) or as a class play, to be read within the classroom.Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or downDuration - around 15 - 20 minutes reading not including music suggestions.The Seven Deadly Sins plus all those Vices? No wonder our Narrator is worried! But as with all good stories, this one has a happy ending - well, maybe not for all those baddies!This is one of a collection of Ancient Greek Myth scripts – assemblies and guided reading scripts, sold as separate and combined products. This play could also be used as a PSHE resource – on resisting temptation, and the victory of good (hope) over evil (Seven Deadly Sins plus, in this case 19 Vices).Sample Text:Music 5 – You’re Beautiful – James Blunt(Epimetheus sings love song to Pandora)Narrator: (Indicating for music to stop) Yes, yes. We get it! Young love!Epimetheus: Oh come on! Look at this perfect woman? How could I possibly resist?Narrator: (To audience) Aha! Somebody else who couldn’t resist temptation!(To Pandora) No offence to you, madam.(To Epimetheus) But did you not look a little deeper? I mean, yes, she’s undoubtedly beautiful but(Optional burst of The Price You Pay – Bruce Springsteen)Pandora: (Angrily) Oh right! It’s the blond argument, right? The ‘well, if she looks that good, there can’t be much underneath’? No spirit, heh?Music 6 Missionary Man – Eurythmics(Pandora throws off her ‘pretty clothes’ displaying a much stronger image)Narrator: (Holding up hand for music to stop) Whoa! That’s not the Perfect Pandora I was expecting!Epimetheus: (Gasping) And that’s not a side of my wife I’ve ever seen before!Pandora: Of course not! You only ever wanted me to be that perfect ‘domestic goddess’ – sitting around, looking pretty, staring vacantly out to space!Epimetheus: Well, isn’t that what wives are supposed to do?Narrator: Not this one, I suspect!(Optional excerpt of Thorn in my Side – Eurythmics – Pandora strutting up and down)Narrator: (Holding hand up) OK. Yes, we’ve got it! So underneath all that sweetness was a whole heap of frustration!Pandora: More like mega boredom! I mean, what was I supposed to do all day?Epimetheus: Stay out of mischief?

By suesplays

The Gorgon's Head Assembly or Class Play

The Gorgon's Head Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths The Gorgon's Head Assembly or Class PlayCast of 30 - easily adaptable up or downDuration: around 10 - 15 minutes not including musicWhat was Poseidon thinking - taking on all these women? He might succeed at putting the youth Perseus in his place but a group of 'wronged women'? Never!This is one of a large collection of Ancient Greek scripts written by Sue Russell – guided reading scripts also available.Sample Text:Medusa: Just like I said! Gods! Men! The bane of our lives!Poseidon: (Clutching his forehead, muttering) I think I have a headache coming on. (Pauses)You know something? I suddenly feel just a little outnumbered! Would you ladies mind just giving me a short break?(Exit Athene, Medusa and Danae, shrugging their shoulders)Poseidon: Phew! Peace at last! Oh, don’t get me wrong. I have nothing against ‘the weaker sex’(Athene comes storming back)Music 3 War – Edwin Starr – Brief excerptAthene: What was that you just said? Weaker, eh? I’ll show you weaker!(Athene strides up and down, wielding her sword)Poseidon: (Holding hand up) OK. I apologize.Athene: Goddess of wisdom and war! (To Poseidon) You’d do well to remember that!Poseidon: (Aside) As if I could forget! (To Athene) Now, what was I saying about having a little peace?Athene: Huh! Give me war any day!(Exit Athene)Poseidon: (Clutching head) Women! I knew I should never have agreed to this!(Enter Perseus, giving Poseidon a ‘high five)Perseus: What’s up, bro?Poseidon: (Indignantly) Bro? I’ll give you bro!Perseus: OK so I guess it’s Uncle, really – seeing as Zeus was my dad, and your brother!Poseidon: Correct! So, no more bro, right?Perseus: Fair enough! So, what’s the plan, dude?Poseidon: (Exploding) Dude? That’s even worse than bro! What is it with you youngsters? Can’t you talk normally?Perseus: (Sighing) OK I’ll try! I’m just not used to hanging out with oldies like you!Poseidon: (Exploding) Now look here, young Perseus! If you and me are going to get along, you need to show a little respect!(Enter Danae)Danae: Perseus! Where are those manners I taught you?Poseidon: I think he might have lost them during his travels!Danae: Well, let’s help him find them again! Poseidon is only trying toPoseidon: (Looking at his watch) Get this story told? Well, that’s proving a bit of a challenge! (To Danae) No offence, madam, but you women don’t half talk a lot!(Enter Polydectes, accompanied by ‘several’ women, all chatting and laughing)Polydectes: (Groaning) Tell me about it! You want to try keeping them quiet in court! Once they get going there’s no stopping them!

By suesplays

Theseus and the Minotaur Assembly or Class Play

Theseus and the Minotaur Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greeks Theseus and the Minotaur Assembly or Class PlayCast of 30 - easily adaptable up or downDuration: 10 - 15 minutes reading (this does not include music suggestions)Monsters and heroes - not the easiest cast to deal with! But then Poseidon is more than man - sorry, make that - god enough to take this lot on!Also available (as separate purchase): This assembly plus Guided Reading Script plus Quiz (one of large collection of Ancient Greek scripts written by Sue Russell)Sample Text:Music 1 – El Matador Music(Cast file into hall, in order of speaking, taking seats along two rows of fifteen facing the audience)Poseidon: Welcome to this tale about(Enter Theseus)Music 2 Holding Out for a Hero – Bonnie Tyler (chorus)(Theseus strides up and down, bracing his muscles and striking various ‘heroic postures’)Theseus: A hero! That’s me, Theseus!(Theseus gestures to cast to cheer)(Whole cast cheers)Poseidon: And(Enter Minotaur)Music 3 Deeper Underground – Jamiroquai (chorus)(Minotaur ‘skulks’ up and down, glaring at both cast and audience)Minotaur: Me! The Minotaur!(Minotaur ‘paws the ground’, snorts in anger and glares at cast who all boo)Poseidon: Hmm. Quite a split! In factTheseus: (Interrupting) You could say, Good versus Evil!Poseidon: (Glaring at Theseus) I could! But I’m not going to, if it’s all the same to you! (To audience, aside) These heroes! Think they’re God’s Gift!Theseus: Well, you may not have regarded me as a gift (pauses) Dad! (Pauses) But my other father did!(Enter Aegeus)Aegeus: Ah Theseus, my son! There you are! (To audience) I hope you haven’t been listening too much to this god, here (pointing at Poseidon). Gods! Way too much time on their hands and far too many off spring to show for it!Poseidon: What was that?Aegeus: Oh nothing, Poseidon! Just commenting on how creatively you fill your time. Truly awesome!Poseidon: Well, as God of the Seas I guess I am rather (pauses) what did you say? Oh, awesome, that’s right! A shame not everyone was in such awe of me as you!(Enter Minos)(Whole cast hisses and boos)Minos: (Angrily) Hey! That’s no way to greet the King of Crete!Aegeus: (Contemptuously) Pah! Some king you were!Minos: (Laughing) Huh! And you were any better, oh great King of Athens? (Pauses) Now, just remind me. Who had to send human sacrifices to who?Aegeus: (Exclaiming) Why, you evil, wicked, cruel, vindictive ..Poseidon: (Interrupting) Yes, yes. I think we get it. You two didn’t like each other much, did you?Aegeus: Oh I’ve barely started.

By suesplays

Odysseus and the Cyclops Assembly or Class Play

Odysseus and the Cyclops Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths Odysseus and the Cyclops Assembly or Class PlayCast of 30 - easily adaptable up or downDuration - around 10 to 15 minutes reading time (around 20 with addition of music)One of several Ancient Greek scripts written by Sue Russell. A set of 5 Ancient Greek Myths is also available in Guided Reading format, each with 6 speakers, and its own quiz.Sample Text:Poseidon: Oh I’m sure it is! So you stopped off at my son’s island for a bit of a holiday? (To audience) I’ve heard the Greek islands are a favourite holiday destination. Island hopping, I believe you call it?Odysseus: Well, that was hardly our intention. We wanted to get home.Ancient Greek 6: But stopping off for a bit of a rest did make sense.Ancient Greek 7: Though it didn’t turn out to be quite the holiday we expected!Ancient Greek 8: Stuck in the back of that cave(Enter Polyphemus, finding his way to the group, with the aid of a white stick)Polyphemus: (Bellowing loudly) My home!Ancient Greek 9: Hardly the best that Airbnb have to offer!Polyphemus: (Bellowing angrily) Pardon? There’s nothing wrong with my cave I’ll have you know!Ancient Greek 10: Nothing at all – until you get your head bashed against one of the walls! I was the first to suffer at your handsAncient Greek 11: And I the second!Ancient Greek 1: And I the third!Ancient Greek 2: And I the fourthAncient Greek 3: And I the fifthAncient Greek 4: And I the sixth!Poseidon: (Tutting) Son! Really! That was rather greedy, even by your standards!Polyphemus: (Muttering sulkily) But I didn’t eat them all in one go!Odysseus: (Sarcastically) Oh that was very good of you!Polyphemus: Well, thank you!Poseidon: No, I think he’s being sarcastic, son! The lowest form of wit. But something tells me, not quite low enough for you!Odysseus: (To Polyphemus) So come on! What have you got to say in your defence? Surely you don’t want your old man thinking you have the table manners of a monster?Polyphemus: (Spluttering) Well, I er,Ancient Greek 5: You just fancied a change from lamb stew, right?Polyphemus: (Beaming) Oh that’s right! Indeed I did!Ancient Greek 6: I expect lamb gets pretty boring night after night?Polyphemus: Oh you’re right!Ancient Greek 7: So we made a pleasant change to your diet?Polyphemus: (Slapping his large belly, fondly) Well, I’d hardly call it a diet!

By suesplays

Let's talk about gender roles

Let's talk about gender roles

I have bundled together three resources which I think will be useful when discussing gender roles in poetry and drama. They all address the roles women play, as wives, mothers , lovers. The quiz is more generally about Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet but some of the questions refer to the fact that Juliet would have been played by a boy back in the seventeenth century. It is light hearted in tone.

By jlimb

Amazing Greek Plays for KS2

Amazing Greek Plays for KS2

Three brilliantly written plays for kids to read in the classroom or act out. Written by Theatre Workshop, a professional touring company working in schools for over 25 years.

By theatreworkshop

Timeline Ancient Greece Poster

Timeline Ancient Greece Poster

This timeline shows the history of the Ancient Greek Civilisation, divided into the most common periods. Above the timeline you will find a short description of the highlights of each period in the same colour as that period on the timeline. Below the timeline, important events are added in the colours of each period. The specific events that marked the transitions between the different periods are added with thicker borders and fading colours.I refer to this poster almost every lesson when I'm teaching Greek or ancient history! It is very useful to allow the students to keep an overview in their mind when we're talking about a specific historical event or person. My students have gotten so used to my poster that they for example say that Plato of course lived in the "yellow"; period, that Homer's texts are from the "blue" period and that the story of Theseus and the Minotaur is situated in the "pink" period. The file is large and detailed enough to print on an A1 format as a poster. I have a Dutch version available too.

By CreativeClassics

The Villas of Pompeii

The Villas of Pompeii

This resource includes: -A 17 slide long PowerPoint about the Villa of the Papyri, Villa of the Mysteries and Villa of Diomedes. It includes a slide per villa with information and images as well as other slides going into more detail about specific parts of the villa.- At the end of the Powerpoint, there is a task slide which comes with information sheets to help the students complete the task.There is also a creative drawing stretch and challenge for early finishers.- There are then 2 worksheets provided which state the basic information that has been covered in the lesson and a challenge sheet where some words are missing so they have to fill them in(which helps with information recall) and then use theses sheets to complete the main task.Objectives: to learn about the three main villas in Pompeii, to analyse the floor plans of villas, to discover some wealthy citizens who owned these villas, to learn about life in Pompeii, to learn about the different areas of an average villa.Objective displayed on presentation: What were the villas of Pompeii? How to use this resource: Add/delete any slides or information you want.You don't need to cover everything as there is a lot of information it covers.Once finished teaching content, guide students through the task and use the print outs provided for each student.

By Chloefear1960

Phoenix Dance and the Olympics

Phoenix Dance and the Olympics

A resource created for Phoenix Dance, looking at the Greeks, the Olympic Games and with inspiration from art and artefacts found in Harewood House in Leeds.

By littlezartok

Ancient Greek Democracy Fun Lesson (Yrs 5-6)

Ancient Greek Democracy Fun Lesson (Yrs 5-6)

In this lesson students get hands on experience of how democracy worked in Ancient Greece by taking part in a class vote Ancient Greek style.They compare democracy with western democracy today and there are three levels of differentiated worksheets for students to complete to assess their understanding.A link to an online prezi is included to project on the whiteboard, as well as a teacher guide and mark scheme. It's everything you need to cover Greek democracy!

By teachingcanbefun

Countries and Languages Colouring Pages

Countries and Languages Colouring Pages

A fun and educational colouring activity, ideal for primary school students, and students learning English as a foreign language. Appropriate for students learning the names of the countries, and the languages spoken. Could be printed out and coloured in to stick on the front of a book or folder to help organise the subjects being studied at school or college. Or as the start of a mind map to find out what students already know, or what they have learnt in their classes. To follow my world first solo row around the coast of Britain and daily life as an explorer: * Free educational videos: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/sarahrowssolo or Amazon Video: http://amzn.to/2jno3v8 * Free virtual field trips: Skype in the Classroom: https://education.microsoft.com/vikingquest * Paid school speaker bookings: http://www.schoolspeakers.co.uk/speaker-listings/sarah-weldon

By sarah277

Greece: Countries and Languages Colouring Page

Greece: Countries and Languages Colouring Page

A fun and educational colouring activity, ideal for primary school students, and students learning English as a foreign language. Appropriate for students learning the names of the countries, and the languages spoken. Could be printed out and coloured in to stick on the front of a book or folder to help organise the subjects being studied at school or college. Or as the start of a mind map to find out what students already know, or what they have learnt in their classes. To follow my world first solo row around the coast of Britain and daily life as an explorer:* Free educational videos: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/sarahrowssolo or Amazon Video: http://amzn.to/2jno3v8* Free virtual field trips: Skype in the Classroom: https://education.microsoft.com/vikingquest* Paid school speaker bookings: http://www.schoolspeakers.co.uk/speaker-listings/sarah-weldon

By sarah277

Greek: Countries and Languages Colouring Page

Greek: Countries and Languages Colouring Page

A fun and educational colouring activity, ideal for primary school students, and students learning English as a foreign language. Appropriate for students learning the names of the countries, and the languages spoken. Could be printed out and coloured in to stick on the front of a book or folder to help organise the subjects being studied at school or college. Or as the start of a mind map to find out what students already know, or what they have learnt in their classes. To follow my world first solo row around the coast of Britain and daily life as an explorer:* Free educational videos: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/sarahrowssolo or Amazon Video: http://amzn.to/2jno3v8* Free virtual field trips: Skype in the Classroom: https://education.microsoft.com/vikingquest* Paid school speaker bookings: http://www.schoolspeakers.co.uk/speaker-listings/sarah-weldon

By sarah277

Ancient Greece Reading Comprehension (Yrs 4-6)

Ancient Greece Reading Comprehension (Yrs 4-6)

This reading activity can be used with years 4-6 depending on ability, either as part of an Ancient Greek unit or as a stand alone reading comprehension exercise. It could be used toward the beginning of an Ancient Greek unit as it references the government, diet and invasions which may all be covered in more detail later.Students start by reading through the information sheet including the basics of geography in Ancient Greece.They then use dictionaries to look up geographical terms and write or draw definitions.Finally, they answer one of two levels of differentiated questions about the reading. An answer key and teacher guide are included.

By teachingcanbefun

Poetry bundle

Poetry bundle

I have bundled together three resources which analyse very different poems.Charles Causley's "What has happened to Lulu?"Carol Ann Duffy's "Medusa" andThomas Hood's "No!"These resources offer in depth analysis of poetry across the ages. They could be utilised individually or combined. Duffy's poem and Causley's poem might be utilised together to portray attitudes towards women for instance.Suitable for 14+

By jlimb

Sale
Greek Root Cards - Illustrated Definitions and Examples

Greek Root Cards - Illustrated Definitions and Examples

Use this pack of Illustrated Greek Roots with definitions to keep your students engaged in fun activities that reinforce the definition of each root with examples of words that take on the meaning of the roots that they contain. Instructions are included for two games your students can play with these cards; 'Say It, Keep It' and 'Root Buzz'.Over two dozen of the most commonly used Greek roots are used in these cards. They are: auto, bio, chron, dyna, gram, graph, hetero, homo, hydr, hypo, logy, meter/metr, micro, mis/miso, mono, morph, nym, phil, phobia, phon, photo/phos, pseudo, psycho, scope, techno, tele, and therm. These cards are created in two different sizes. The original set has 8 cards per page and the larger set has 2 cards per page. The small set will save you ink and paper but many teachers have indicated to me that they preferred to have a larger set to make a bulletin board display. So, that's why I added the larger version. A storage box template is also included for these cards.For Grades 4 & 5. 22 Pages. Aligned to Common Core Standards (CCSS): L.4.4b and L.5.4b

By TeacherNyla

Poetry analysis: "Medusa" by Carol Ann Duffy

Poetry analysis: "Medusa" by Carol Ann Duffy

This Power point resource provides background information from Greek mythology to shed light on Carol Ann Duffy's poem, "Medusa". Each stanza is analysed in turn over ten slides and an analysis is given which references the power of three, sibilance, onomatopoeia, extended metaphor, paradox, alliteration and much more.This resource is intended to be used as a starting point for discussion and is broken down into individual stanzas so that the students have an opportunity to discuss the poet's intentions and use of language before the given analysis appears. This poem would be useful when discussing gender roles and misogyny.This resource is suitable for ages 14+

By jlimb