1. Resources Home
  2. Primary
  3. Religious education
  4. World religions
  5. Hinduism
Yoga And Religion

Yoga And Religion

Many Hindus practice meditation and yoga to help them achieve moksha. It involves extreme self-discipline over the mind and body using different exercises. There are various types of yoga which Hindus believe will aid their union with Brahman. This worksheet looks at three different types of yoga Hindus use and the students discuss how they think these help them.
WillsonEducation
Pilgrimages - The River Ganges

Pilgrimages - The River Ganges

A Pilgrimage is a journey to a special religious place, people undertake pilgrimages for several personal reasons, for peace (to say sorry to their god), as part of their beliefs or because they are ill. These worksheets discuss what a pilgrimage is, why the River Ganges is important to the people of India and the story of Ganda and Lord Shiva.
WillsonEducation
Karma

Karma

Samara can happen many times but Hindus don’t remember their past lives, however they believe everything they do in their lives will affect what will happen in their next. Freedom from this cycle is called Moksha and Hindus believe there are many ways to achieve this, one being karma. This worksheet looks at what karma is, discusses examples and how its presents accounts for the existence of evil and suffering.
WillsonEducation
Hinduism - Four Stages Of Life

Hinduism - Four Stages Of Life

The Hindu society has followed the four stages of life since ancient times, the four stages are the outline for the ideal Hindu life. Each stage is different and has its own set of duties. The four stages are traditionally for men. These worksheets discuss these different stages, what they mean today and encourage the students to create their own four stages of life which they believe to be important in today world
WillsonEducation
Brahman And Other Hindu Gods

Brahman And Other Hindu Gods

Brahman is believed to be the underpinning spirit of the world and to be found in everything. He has many different characteristics represented in different forms which are called avatars, or murtis. There are thousands of gods and goddesses whom which Hindus can worship, all with their own special individual characteristics, which allow followers to choose their own deities. Many believe all these gods and goddesses are different aspects of the unchanging ultimate supreme Brahman. In groups the students are given an opportunity to create a poster which will come together with the rest of the class to show as many of the Hindu god and goddesses as possible – possibly about 30 depending in the size of your class (!)
WillsonEducation
Hinduism - A Mysterious Beast, Brahman And Other Hindu Gods

Hinduism - A Mysterious Beast, Brahman And Other Hindu Gods

The best way to illustrate the diversity of Hinduism is through the story of ‘A Mysterious Beast.’ A ‘Mysterious Beast’ (essentially an elephant!) came to the Land of the Blind; the king set his courtiers to find out what it was. Each man described a different part of the elephant, all the men in the story are correct and telling the truth but only in part, as with the elephant, Hinduism is made up of many parts, though beneath all this verity there is one unchanging reality: Brahman. Brahman is believed to be the underpinning spirit of the world and to be found in everything. He has many different characteristics represented in different forms which are called avatars, or murtis. There are thousands of gods and goddesses whom which Hindus can worship, all with their own special individual characteristics, which allow followers to choose their own deities. Many believe all these gods and goddesses are different aspects of the unchanging ultimate supreme Brahman. These worksheets include a game which explains how each part of the elephant is described by the blind men and asks the students to explain how this is linked to the Hindu religion. In groups the students are given an opportunity to create a poster which will come together with the rest of the class to show as many of the Hindu god and goddesses as possible – possibly about 30 depending in the size of your class (!)
WillsonEducation
Hinduism - A Mysterious Beast

Hinduism - A Mysterious Beast

The best way to illustrate the diversity of Hinduism is through the story of ‘A Mysterious Beast.’ A ‘Mysterious Beast’ (essentially an elephant!) came to the Land of the Blind; the king set his courtiers to find out what it was. Each man described a different part of the elephant, all the men in the story are correct and telling the truth but only in part, as with the elephant, Hinduism is made up of many parts. These worksheets include a game which explains how each part of the elephant is described by the blind men and asks the students to explain how this is linked to the Hindu religion
WillsonEducation
Religious Festivals Topic Vocabulary Pack

Religious Festivals Topic Vocabulary Pack

Religious Festivals! This 15-page Religious Festivals TVP will help bring to life your topic! The ninja has carefully selected 4 key areas to study and explore: Chinese New Year, Lent, Diwali and Ramadan! We have created exciting lists of topic-focused nouns, verbs and adjectives to enhance pupil writing. Researched etymologies of religion-related words for you to teach. The ninja has even provided a unique Vocabulary Ninja reward system (including certificates), branded display resources, and blank templates of Synonym Alley and Vocabulary Laboratory activities. The ninja has even supplied two pages of teaching techniques, helping you bring to life each resource.
VocabularyNinja
Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism Assemblies

Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism Assemblies

As part of our provision we do assemblies on all of the main faiths. These are focused on Eastern traditions and provide a whistle stop tour of each. Could also be used in tutor time as does not involve a background knowledge.
jmather3
RE Hinduism Year 2 - To understand how Karma makes Hindus behave. Sorting activity.

RE Hinduism Year 2 - To understand how Karma makes Hindus behave. Sorting activity.

This is an activity where the children have to organise the actions of Hindus into 'would do' and 'wouldn't do'. There are two red sorting circles and a sheet of images for them to cut out. The LO is also included. At the end of this activity I asked two questions to further their learning....What does the word ' Karma' mean? (action) and Do you believe in Karma? Why? the children wrote these in their books and answered them. I hope this helps and saves time!
vbanks
Stories from Hindu Traditions

Stories from Hindu Traditions

These are teaching resources for use in Religious and Moral Education, and describe some of the stories of various Hindu traditions. Although the resources have been created in consultation with Education Scotland and Scottish school teachers, we hope they will also be useful to teachers in other parts of the UK (or even beyond). The resource is structured to meet the Education Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence standard for RME. The resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story. The file contains six stories in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to the Mahabharata (or Mahābhārata, pronounced ma-haa baa-ra-ta), one of the great epics of India. The Descent of the Ganges also has an accompanying PowerPoint presentation for illustrative purposes. Resources provided as part of the project Approaching Religion Through Story are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. They are free to use, copy and adapt for all non-commercial purposes. More RME resources can be found at http://www.storyandreligion.div.ed.ac.uk/schools/resources/ , and more OERs from the University of Edinburgh can be found at open.ed.ac.uk .
OpenEd