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What were conditions like in the trenches

What were conditions like in the trenches

A Year 9 lesson on conditions in the trenches, beginning with a story about the mud at Passchendaele, an analysis of what made trenches such an effective system of defence in the first place and then an evaluation of what trench conditions were like and the biggest dangers a soldier on the front line would have faced.
adharding91
Why Enlist - Propaganda in WW1

Why Enlist - Propaganda in WW1

Lesson that introduces pupils to the concept of propaganda, pupils complete a carousel in which they analyse posters and how they would make them feel. They evaluate how likely they would have been to join the army and then analyse how useful a fictional soldiers account of why he joined the army is (preparation for GCSE edexcel how useful question).
ellie_ryl
First World War poetry plan Year 6/7 Wilfred Owen Dulce et Decorum est outstanding teacher WWI

First World War poetry plan Year 6/7 Wilfred Owen Dulce et Decorum est outstanding teacher WWI

This differentiated literacy lesson is about Wilfred Owen’s iconic First World War poem Dulce et Decorum est and is ideal for a Year 6 or 7 class. It is differentiated three ways. The lesson begins by introducing children to the poet, whose work they listen to as part of an animated video clip. Partner/group work then enables the pupils to analyse the poem and explore the language used before writing their own individual version. This document includes the lesson plan with plenary, three differentiated versions of sections of the poem and information/pictures to display on the board for extra inspiration. I have not been observed teaching this particular lesson but I have received an outstanding grade in all my most recent literacy observations.
Sammy55
Introduction to WW1 - distribution of power in 1914

Introduction to WW1 - distribution of power in 1914

Pupils evaluate the power of each country by analysing whether they have an army, money, empire and any other relevant information. They then argue why they think their country is the most powerful and get into a ‘living line’ from most to least powerful. They must then defend their decision. Leads into a lesson regarding long and short term causes of WW1 including the assassination of FF.
ellie_ryl
Exposure - Wilfred Owen - Bundle!

Exposure - Wilfred Owen - Bundle!

These resources are designed to help students gain understanding, assessment skills, and key interpretations of Wilfred Owen's vivid and harrowing World War I poem: 'Exposure.' Students will complete this learning having gathered vital skills in: interpreting the significant meanings of the poem, understanding the poet's ideas within the poem, analysing the features of form and structure, considering settings and themes, and understanding Owen's language devices. The bundle contains: - The comprehensive and engaging lesson, - The visually-appealing and informative knowledge organiser/ revision mat, - A range of resources to prepare your students for critically comparing poems. The lessons included are interactive, employ a variety of different teaching and learning methods and styles, and are visually-engaging. Resources, worksheets, and lesson plans are all provided.
TandLGuru
Exposure - Wilfred Owen

Exposure - Wilfred Owen

This engaging, comprehensive lesson aims to improve students’ understanding of Wilfred Owen’s WWI power and conflict poem ‘Exposure’ with particular focus upon the language, structure, and subject matter used within the poem. By the end of the lesson, students demonstrate their knowledge of the text analytically, through assured, appropriate, and sustained interpretations. The lesson follows a step-by-step learning journey, in which children learn through: Considering the meanings of the word ‘exposure’ and inferring what this may suggest about the meaning of the poem; Securing contextual understanding of the conditions and weather faced by WWI soldiers; Reading and interpreting the poem, using a provided line-by-line analysis, and interactive group activities; Developing their understanding through inferring and analysing key language and structural choices; Analysing how the themes of suffering and misery are conveyed through Owen’s language and structure choices; Self/ Peer assessing each other’s learning attempts. Included is: Whole lesson PowerPoint - colourful and substantial; (including hyperlinks to informative and videos) Copy of poem (freely available online); Deeper thinking worksheet; Analysis template with success criteria for creating well-structured responses; Comprehensive lesson plan. All resources are provided as word documents (for easy editing) and PDF documents (to ensure consistency of formatting between computers). There are also opportunities for group learning, peer assessment, and whole class discussion. This was originally taught to middle-ability year 10 and 11 groups, but can easily be differentiated for groups of different ages and abilities. All images are licensed for commercial use, and image rights are listed on the last page of the presentation.
TandLGuru