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Art has had a continuous involvement with education on various levels. He has taught at the junior high, high school and university levels and has presented lectures and field courses to a variety of private and public organizations, including the University of New Brunswick, University of Toronto, University of Waterloo, University of Western Ontario, University of Guelph, Huntsman Marine Science Centre, NB Community College, etc. He was Education Director at the Atlantic Salmon Federation.

Art has had a continuous involvement with education on various levels. He has taught at the junior high, high school and university levels and has presented lectures and field courses to a variety of private and public organizations, including the University of New Brunswick, University of Toronto, University of Waterloo, University of Western Ontario, University of Guelph, Huntsman Marine Science Centre, NB Community College, etc. He was Education Director at the Atlantic Salmon Federation.
LOUIS A. FUERTES - BIRD ART
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LOUIS A. FUERTES - BIRD ART

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A collection of 16 full colour clips and 16 full colour printables By Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 - 1927). Biography included. THE COLLECTION: This clip art collection includes 16 images from various sources. The images have been extracted and upgraded using Adobe Photoshop to give the best possible results. They can be used in any project but this collection may not be resold. LOUIS AGASSIZ FUERTES Louis Agassiz Fuertes (February 7, 1874 Ithaca, New York – August 22, 1927 Unadilla, New York) was an American ornithologist, illustrator and artist who set the rigorous and current-day standards for ornithological art and naturalist depiction and is considered as one of the most prolific American bird artists, second only to his guiding professional predecessor John James Audubon. After graduating from Cornell in 1897 and became an apprentice to the painter Abbott H. Thayer. In 1898, he made his first expedition, with Thayer and his son Gerald, to Florida.[1] In 1899, Fuertes accompanied E. H. Harriman on his famous exploration of the Alaska coastline, the Harriman Alaska Expedition. Fuertes later traveled across much of the United States and to many countries in pursuit of birds, including the Bahamas, Jamaica, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, and Ethiopia. Fuertes collaborated with Frank Chapman, curator of the American Museum of Natural History, on many assignments including field research, background dioramas at the museum, and book illustrations. While on a collecting expedition with Chapman in Mexico, Fuertes discovered a species of oriole. Chapman named it Icterus fuertesi, commonly called Fuertes’s oriole after his friend.
COLOR AND LEARN: Life in a Lake
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COLOR AND LEARN: Life in a Lake

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A great resource for those involved with the environment … Fish Friends, Trout in the Classroom, etc. These 8 1/2 x 11 and 11 x 17 coloring pages presents a whimsical look at a typical lake and some of its inhabitants … humans, bass, otter, leopard frog, dragonfly, mergansers and pickerel. Each of these species is also provided as a framed 8"x8" clip that can be colored. Links to learning sites are provided.
How to Build a Rainchain
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How to Build a Rainchain

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I’ve always been interested in rainchains and wondered how they would work here in the northeast where we get some substantial downfalls. Well, I finally made one. As I discovered, there are many, many ways to do this … only limited by your imagination. In my case I purchased some cute little blue pails from the local Dollar Store and some plastic chain from my hardware store. Everything else was scrounged or recycled materials. I just removed the handle from a pail and CAREFULLY drilled a one inch hole in the bottom, passed the chain through to the calculated link and crimp the handle back in place. I repeated this until I had the length I needed and voila … my rainchain. I was curious to see how it would work of course, but fortunately there was no rush because I must have chased the rains … nothing happened for many days. But then on September 29, 2012 the rain finally came down. The rainchain worked great, but the water just went into a big pail that overflowed allowing the water to go where we didn’t want it to go! So … I found a 2.5 gal plastic pail that once held drywall compound, drilled holes in the bottom and top with a big hole to accommodate a scrap plastic “pipe” that went to the bottom of the pail. I put some window screen over the top of the pail top so dirt wouldn’t drain into the pail and covered it all with soil … except the “pipe” opening of course. Now the rain drains down the chain, into the pipe and collects in the underground pail where it soaks into the earth. Now it doesn’t flow along the ground to the house entrance like it did before …VICTORY!!