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Rock Types Foldable Notes
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Rock Types Foldable Notes

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My students love foldable notes. The combination of being manipulative, something they created…and honestly, NOT a bunch of typical comp book notes, makes them more interested in revisiting the notes outside of class. Foldable Requires: -2 sheets of construction paper (different colors) -Tape/stapler -Scissors -Ruler/straightedge When finished, the foldable will show the 3 rock types on the outside, as well as “The Rock Cycle”. On the inside, students will find definitions of each (provided by you)
Gravity and Friction (Air Resistance) Lab - BUNDLE
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Gravity and Friction (Air Resistance) Lab - BUNDLE

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This bundle includes both the lab instructions, as well as the video of the lab. In this activity, students explore how gravity and friction (air resistance) affect the speed of a following object. Students will work in groups of 2-3. The activity takes one class period (~45 minutes), including intro, lab, post-discussion. The materials needed are: one sheet of paper per group (cut into two halves), a heavy book that’s larger than the 1/2 sheet of paper, and a chair to stand on. My students enjoy this activity, as it’s a bit counter-intuitive. The lab is in Word format, so feel free to adjust/adapt it to fit your needs, and the needs of your students. There is also a companion video for the lab available, should you want to see how it’s done, or provide it as a way for students to make up a missed lab.
Metric Conversion Practice Worksheet
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Metric Conversion Practice Worksheet

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This worksheet includes many metric conversion problems for students to hone their skills. An answer key is included. I typically assign this as homework (after lots of practice in class), and give students free access to the answer key, so they can check their progress, and revisit, if needed. I use the “stairstep” method of metric conversion in my classroom, with great success (middle school). You’ll find my stairstep handout, as well as my “how-to” video in my store.
Setting up the X/Y Axis on a Graph - Formula and Example Sheet
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Setting up the X/Y Axis on a Graph - Formula and Example Sheet

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This simple worksheet shows students a simple formula (basic math) to use when setting up the X-Y axis on a graph. Many teachers use the “guess and check” method, but using the formula takes 5 seconds, and tells the students how to number the Y axis and space the X axis in such a way to utilize the majority of their space WITHOUT any erasing and reworking! I also have a “how-to” video, explaining how to use the formulas, for students who missed class, or need more practice.
Clucking Chicken Sound Activity - Pitch, Frequency, Amplitude, Volume, Vibration, Energy
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Clucking Chicken Sound Activity - Pitch, Frequency, Amplitude, Volume, Vibration, Energy

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In this lab, students investigate a device called a “clucking chicken”. Through their experimentation, students look at how vibrations travel from particle to particle to create sound, The investigation also looks at how varying the energy input to the system can also affect volume, as well as pitch. Materials needed are disposable plastic cups, paperclips, string, and 1-2 cellulose sponges. I’ve included a video explanation of the lab, as well as the student instructions. Unfortunately, with the fact that it’s all live motion, and I wanted to make the video playable on any device, I had to scale it down to 720p, as it was just over the 200MB limit in full HD. My 7th graders love doing this activity every year…the parents, less so…Something about their kid coming home, and asking for a cup, a paperclip, and some string…seemingly harmless objects… I’ve added a downloadable copy of the video as a supporting document. This will allow you to share it with your students PRIVATELY, such as via Google Classroom. Please do not post it publicly.
Atom Properties (mass, number, electron, proton, neutron, model (bohr), valence)
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Atom Properties (mass, number, electron, proton, neutron, model (bohr), valence)

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In this worksheet, students practice some basic skills surrounding atoms. How many protons, neutrons, or electrons do they have? What are their atomic masses and atomic numbers? They practice these skills by filling information into a table. I have provided some of the information, and they need to use it to fill in the blanks. For instance, if I state that an element has 20 protons, its atomic number must be 20. Students are then asked to use their periodic tables to collect the same information for several other elements (ones that aren’t included in the first part of the worksheet). In this way, students learn to use the periodic table to collect this information, as well as how to use information they know about an element to figure out the missing parts. On the back of the worksheet, they’re tasked with drawing Bohr models of a few atoms (only the first two electron levels), then identify how many valence electrons the element has. This is a great worksheet for basic chemistry skills, either in middle school, or 9th grade physical science, or perhaps even chemistry, as a refresher/check.
Types of Reactions (synthesis, decomposition, single/double displacement)
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Types of Reactions (synthesis, decomposition, single/double displacement)

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In this straightforward worksheet, students are given a written chemical reaction, and asked to identify whether it’s an example of synthesis, decomposition, single displacement, or double displacement. This worksheet would work well with a chemistry class, or 9th grade physical science class, but I’ve also used it for my advanced 7th grade physical science class before, with good success. There are 24 questions, and an answer key is included.
Electricity Circuit Comic Strip Project (Series / Parallel) 8-day Project
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Electricity Circuit Comic Strip Project (Series / Parallel) 8-day Project

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In this eight-day project, students will create a comic strip to show their understanding of series and parallel circuits. I’ve provided the project in Word form, so you can tweak it to fit your teaching style, grade level, or student group. This could easily be used anywhere from middle school, through high school. At the high school level, expectations to include circuit “math” could be incorporated to the scoring rubric. Over the course of the 8 days, they’ll use a brainstorming sheet to pull the information required to make the comic from their notes, complete a sheet outlining the 5 elements of their story. Once they have these ready to go, they create a written version (script) of their comic, followed by a day where they test and practice drawing the repeated images that will be in their comic (main characters, background, etc). They they create a rough draft of their comic, and have a peer edit it for them. The peer editor is provided with a guided editing form, where they’re asked to look for each aspect outlined in the scoring guide, and identify where they (hopefully) found it in the comic. Once this is all complete, the students are given 3 days to create their final masterpiece, to be turned in. Grading-wise, I only grade the final product, with informal checks throughout the project. This could easily be adjusted, with formative assessments given for any/all aspects of the project (brainstorm, elements, rough draft, edit). I’ve included two versions of the WRITTEN COMIC section of the project: My original, which includes comic strip style boxes, and the revised, which is set up like lined paper. I found that they couldn’t resist drawing pictures (and wasting a LOT of time), rather than spending the time creating a good STORY, which prompted the revision. I’ve included BOTH, just in case you like one or the other. In addition, I’ve included a variety of example comics, ranging across the spectrum when it comes to artistic ability and/or story telling prowess. Overall, these examples met the expectations of the rubric well, earning 90%+. I have these examples available for my students during early stages of the project, should they need inspiration, or see ideas of how their comic can really be ANYTHING they want.
Observations and Inferences Activity/Homework
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Observations and Inferences Activity/Homework

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Simple homework/class activity, where students pick an object, and write down five good observations about it. They then use these observations to come up with one inference about the object. The purpose of the activity is to practice creating GOOD observations. Could easily be done in a 5-10 minute classroom activity/discussion, or done as homework, then discussed the following day.
Informal Lab Report Sheet
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Informal Lab Report Sheet

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This basic lab report can be used generically with many labs. Students are given a problem to solve, or question to answer. They make a prediction, backing it up with observations, then complete the lab, collecting data and observations as they go. They then try to explain the science behind their observations using information from their notes, or prior experiences. Finally, they’re asked to explain what the investigation proves, again, backing it up with observations from the lab.
Reading a Metric Ruler - Video
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Reading a Metric Ruler - Video

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Duration: 5:30 Quality: 1080p Format: MP4 In this video, I walk step-by-step through how to read a metric ruler. I also walk the students through several examples, showing them how to easily, and accurately measure the length of an object, both in centimeters, and millimeters. This video can be used in conjunction with my metric ruler worksheet, to help students who are struggling find success with this key skill. Please feel free to share privately (Google Classroom?) with students. Do not post publicly on the web.
Atomic Charges - Short Creative Writing
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Atomic Charges - Short Creative Writing

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A RAFT is a short writing assignment where students take on a ROLE, address a certain AUDIENCE, in a particular FORMAT, about a given TOPIC. For my science class, since my focus is on the SCIENCE, rather than the writing, I keep the format simple…a letter. In this RAFT, students play the role of a proton, and choose to either write a love letter to an electron, or a letter to another proton, explaining why they can’t be friends. Included is an example of a class brainstorming session that should give you an idea of what that might look like, as well as an example RAFT, about a different science topic, so you can see how a RAFT comes together. I typically score mine in this fashion: Accurate and complete science content = 75% Correct grammar/spelling = 20% Proper format = 5%
Roller Coaster Extravaganza Project (9-day) - Engineering, Physics, Forces, Energy
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Roller Coaster Extravaganza Project (9-day) - Engineering, Physics, Forces, Energy

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In this 9-day-long project, students work as a team to construct a large roller coaster out of foam pipe insulation The project progresses through multiple stages: -Small-scale testing -Designing the full scale coaster (on paper), based on the testing -Creating a prototype full-scale coaster based on their design -Tweaking the design to overcome flaws and challenges -Creating an “advertisement” type poster for their coaster -Creating a written set of ‘reflection’ questions about the process -Building and showing off their final roller coaster design This whole process takes 9 class periods (50min classes), but this can easily be tweaked to fit your schedule. I’ve created a packet that groups will have access to during each class period, outlining the expectations for each stage. The document also includes a score sheet, where students can see where the points are in each stage, and it also creates a simple way for the teacher to document group scores as the project progresses. All of the materials are in WORD format, and I encourage you to tweak, adjust, adapt the project to fit your needs. It could easily be adjusted to focus on energy conversions/conservation, engineering/design, or force (gravitational force, Newton’s Laws, etc). I use this activity as my final project, at the end of our energy unit, prior to diving into some review and prep for my year-end final exam. As is, it’s light on the academics, focusing more on teamwork, design challenges, and the ability to reflect on the creative process. My students love this project! Every year, I have new students whose older siblings have told them about the project, and how much fun it was!
Foldable Energy Unit Notes
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Foldable Energy Unit Notes

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This is a comprehensive foldable that includes the following information: -Definition of energy -Specifics of KE, PE -PE is then broken into PEgrav and PEelastic -7 Types of energy -Energy Conservation -Energy Conversions The foldable is broken into four flaps, with the front/back of each flap being used. The thumbnail gives you an idea of how each main tab is further cut/broken up. Materials: Two different colors of construction paper, scissors, rulers, staplers Foldables are a great way to give students a compact, visual study guide. The download includes the unit notes (Word format), Smartboard (Notebook) step-by-step directions for creating the foldable, as well as a PDF of the step-by-step directions. My students love making these (they call it “arts and crafts time”), and they make studying/review more fun for them.
End of Year Group Review Game (any subject)
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End of Year Group Review Game (any subject)

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In this activity, which my kids LOVE, students must quickly scramble to think of concepts/ideas/topics that they’ve learned about over the course of the year, and list them, within a time limit. The game can be played in any subject, and should be easy to understand for ages 10+. The game will take approximately one 45 minute class, depending on how quickly you move the students along, versus allowing them to “express themselves” during the scoring section of the game! Following this portion of the activity, the class moves through the scoring round, where topics are shared with the whole class. It’s a fast paced game that my students found exciting, and fun. I used it as a kickstarter for our end-of-year final test preparation/review. It’s a great way to get them thinking about all of the material that’s been covered during the year! The only materials you need are some construction paper (or index cards), and some way to project a timer for the class to see.
Gravity and Friction (Air Resistance) Lab
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Gravity and Friction (Air Resistance) Lab

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In this activity, students explore how gravity and friction (air resistance) affect the speed of a following object. Students will work in groups of 2-3. The activity takes one class period (~45 minutes), including intro, lab, post-discussion. The materials needed are: one sheet of paper per group (cut into two halves), a heavy book that’s larger than the 1/2 sheet of paper, and a chair to stand on. My students enjoy this activity, as it’s a bit counter-intuitive. The lab is in Word format, so feel free to adjust/adapt it to fit your needs, and the needs of your students. There is also a companion video for the lab available, should you want to see how it’s done, or provide it as a way for students to make up a missed lab.
Measuring with a Metric Ruler Practice Worksheet
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Measuring with a Metric Ruler Practice Worksheet

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This worksheet is meant to help students practice measuring with a metric ruler, both in centimeters, and millimeters. They will be asked to measure objects, as well as draw objects or various lengths. The worksheet includes a “how-to” reminder for students on how to read a metric ruler. I use this worksheet in conjunction with my foldable metric ruler, which is available in my store. I do this because cheap rulers, such as the ones parents usually buy, can vary greatly in their accuracy. When all students use my printed rulers, they should all get the same answers as I do, when I make my key. No key is included, as your rulers may differ, and if using my foldable ruler, different printers can cause scaling issues, making a key useless. I also sell a supplemental video, detailing how to read and use a metric ruler, helping students (and possibly teachers) become masters at metric measurement.
Metric System - Short Creative Writing
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Metric System - Short Creative Writing

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A RAFT is a short writing assignment where students take on a ROLE, address a certain AUDIENCE, in a particular FORMAT, about a given TOPIC. For my science class, since my focus is on the SCIENCE, rather than the writing, I keep the format simple…a letter. In this RAFT, students play the role of the metric system, explaining to the US standard system how they’re better. Included is an example of a class brainstorming session that I completed with my 7th graders (this is their first RAFT of the year), to give you an idea of what that might look like, as well as an example RAFT, about a different science topic. I typically score mine in this fashion: Accurate and complete science content = 75% Correct grammar/spelling = 20% Proper format = 5%
Metric Conversion How-To Video
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Metric Conversion How-To Video

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Duration: 11:30 + 4:30 Quality: 1080p Format: MP4 Metric conversions can be challenging for many students. I use the “Stairstep” method with my middle school students, with great success. I am offering these videos as a tool to use in conjunction with my Metric Stairstep handout, and Metric Conversion worksheet, which is available as a stand-alone product in my store. The first part of the video is 11:30 long, and covers information such as what makes the metric system easier than the US Standard, why I feel the stairstep method is the best method for metric conversions, and finishes up with a step-by-step walkthrough of how to use the metric stairstep. The second part of the video is 4:30 long, and includes 5 example problems for students to attempt. The video then walks through the 5 problems, step-by-step. These are excellent supplemental tools to help students master this skill. Feel free to share it privately (Google Classroom?) with your students, but please do not post it publicly on the web.
Static Charge - Short Creative Writing
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Static Charge - Short Creative Writing

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A RAFT is a short writing assignment where students take on a ROLE, address a certain AUDIENCE, in a particular FORMAT, about a given TOPIC. For my science class, since my focus is on the SCIENCE, rather than the writing, I keep the format simple…a letter. In this RAFT, students play the role of an everyday object, and explain how static charges affect their interaction with objects around them. Students will have two RAFTs to choose from. Included is an example of a class brainstorming session that should give you an idea of what that might look like, as well as an example RAFT, about a different science topic, so you can see how a RAFT comes together. I typically score mine in this fashion: Accurate and complete science content = 75% Correct grammar/spelling = 20% Proper format = 5%