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Speed and Acceleration Practice Worksheet
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Speed and Acceleration Practice Worksheet

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In this worksheet, covering the topics of speed and acceleration, students are asked to complete 23 questions, ranging from direct calculations (here’s your distance, here’s your time) to simple story problems. In addition, two bonus questions are included at the end of the worksheet for students who need a challenge. Of them requires students to convert between time units in their speed calculation, while the other requires them to determine the rate of acceleration in a situation, rather than the resulting speed. An answer key is included. I use this in my 7th grade classroom, but it could easily be used in a freshman science class, or high school physics, perhaps with some adjustment to difficulty.
Calculating Density Worksheet
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Calculating Density Worksheet

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In this worksheet, students will work on their skills with calculating density. The worksheet includes a variety of problems -Calculate the density of a box, given its dimensions and mass -Calculate the density of an irregular object, given pre/post volume measurements in a graduated cylinder and mass -Calculate mass, given mass and volume -Determine if an object will float or sink in a liquid, given the density of the two materials -Determine how non-mixing liquids will layer out, given their densities. An answer key is included! I use this worksheet with my 7th graders, but it could easily be used as is, or adjusted to meet the needs of a 9th grade physical science class, or a physics class.
Printable Periodic Table - Simple - Student Use - Both Filled in, and Blank
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Printable Periodic Table - Simple - Student Use - Both Filled in, and Blank

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I had the hardest time finding a good, simple, easy to read periodic table for my students to use in physical science/chemistry. I wanted it to be easy to read, contain rounded mass numbers, and be nice and clean, so my students could label it, and color it, as we learned about the various aspects of chemistry. I sat down, and in Word, created a box for each element, filled them in, then arranged them into the table, and presto (it took FOREVER), I had exactly what I wanted. Now YOU don’t have to! EVERY aspect of the table is editable, so you can tweak things, if you’d like, without having to create it from scratch! I print these on white cardstock, have them 3-hole punched, and have a student aide put hole protectors on two of the holes. Even my middle school students manage to make them survive the whole year like this! This includes atomic number 1-103, with the lanthanide/actinide series pulled out at the bottom I’ve included a BLANK periodic table: -Symbols -Names -Atomic Number -Rounded mass number -KEY on hyrdrogen -General labels for location of metals, nonmetals, noble gasses, transition elements, lanthanide, actinide …and a FILLED periodic table -Color coded (with key) for metals, nonmetals, metalloids, liquids, gasses. -Group and period numbers -Bonding charges (Group 1/2, 15-18) -Valence electrons (Group 1/2, 13-18) -Special note on helium for valence, since it doesn’t follow the pattern.
Observations and Inferences Activity/Homework
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Observations and Inferences Activity/Homework

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Simple homework/class activity, where students pick an object, and write down five good observations about it. They then use these observations to come up with one inference about the object. The purpose of the activity is to practice creating GOOD observations. Could easily be done in a 5-10 minute classroom activity/discussion, or done as homework, then discussed the following day.
Atom Properties (mass, number, electron, proton, neutron, model (bohr), valence)
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Atom Properties (mass, number, electron, proton, neutron, model (bohr), valence)

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In this worksheet, students practice some basic skills surrounding atoms. How many protons, neutrons, or electrons do they have? What are their atomic masses and atomic numbers? They practice these skills by filling information into a table. I have provided some of the information, and they need to use it to fill in the blanks. For instance, if I state that an element has 20 protons, its atomic number must be 20. Students are then asked to use their periodic tables to collect the same information for several other elements (ones that aren’t included in the first part of the worksheet). In this way, students learn to use the periodic table to collect this information, as well as how to use information they know about an element to figure out the missing parts. On the back of the worksheet, they’re tasked with drawing Bohr models of a few atoms (only the first two electron levels), then identify how many valence electrons the element has. This is a great worksheet for basic chemistry skills, either in middle school, or 9th grade physical science, or perhaps even chemistry, as a refresher/check.
Chemical and Physical Change Examples Practice Worksheet
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Chemical and Physical Change Examples Practice Worksheet

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In this worksheet, students will be asked to: -Identify whether an example is a chemical change, or a physical change, then defend their answer (signs of a reaction, or explanation of why it’s not) (9 questions) -Fill in some missing words in statements that demonstrate an understanding chemical and physical change (5 questions) -Identify the reactant(s), reaction, and product(s) in a written reaction (2 questions) An answer key is also included
Types of Energy Conversion / Conservation Worksheet
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Types of Energy Conversion / Conservation Worksheet

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In this worksheet, students look at how energy doesn’t come from nowhere, and how energy isn’t lost…but rather changes forms in a system. Students work through examples such as a flashlight that’s been turned on, a moving foot kicking a soccer ball. Seven of these type of problems are included. In the worksheet, I use the CEMENTS list of types of energy: -Chemical -Electrical -Mechanical -Electromagnetic -Nuclear -Thermal -Sound The worksheet also includes a problem about a bouncing ball that focuses on mechanical energy (kinetic, potential gravitational, potential elastic), as well as a problem that ties the two types of problems together (looking at why a roller coaster has progressively lower hills). The worksheet includes an answer key, and is in Word format. You’re more than welcome to edit the document to suit the needs of your students, and your teaching style.
Metric Conversion - Stairstep Method
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Metric Conversion - Stairstep Method

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Metric conversions is often taught in a way that’s confusing to many students. It involved multiplying or dividing by 10 repeatedly, or multiplying or dividing by 10, 100, 1000, 10000, etc. This document simplifies this process, using the stairstep method. I’ve used it with great success in my middle school science classes. The only skills students need: -Ability to count to 6 -Know their left from their right -Know how to find the decimal point in a number (including a whole number) I’ve included two different versions of the stairstep. In one, it includes step-by-step directions, as well as a worked out example problem. The other version includes only the stairstep, such as might be used on a quiz. I also have a “how-to” video for metric conversions, for student/teacher use for sale on my page, as well as a practice worksheet.
Types of Reactions (synthesis, decomposition, single/double displacement)
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Types of Reactions (synthesis, decomposition, single/double displacement)

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In this straightforward worksheet, students are given a written chemical reaction, and asked to identify whether it’s an example of synthesis, decomposition, single displacement, or double displacement. This worksheet would work well with a chemistry class, or 9th grade physical science class, but I’ve also used it for my advanced 7th grade physical science class before, with good success. There are 24 questions, and an answer key is included.
Gravity and Friction (Air Resistance) Lab
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Gravity and Friction (Air Resistance) Lab

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In this activity, students explore how gravity and friction (air resistance) affect the speed of a following object. Students will work in groups of 2-3. The activity takes one class period (~45 minutes), including intro, lab, post-discussion. The materials needed are: one sheet of paper per group (cut into two halves), a heavy book that’s larger than the 1/2 sheet of paper, and a chair to stand on. My students enjoy this activity, as it’s a bit counter-intuitive. The lab is in Word format, so feel free to adjust/adapt it to fit your needs, and the needs of your students. There is also a companion video for the lab available, should you want to see how it’s done, or provide it as a way for students to make up a missed lab.
Counting the Type and Number of Atoms in a Chemical Formula Worksheet
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Counting the Type and Number of Atoms in a Chemical Formula Worksheet

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This worksheet (with an optional companion video!) has students practice the skill of taking a chemical formula, and determining the elements int he formula, as well as the number of atoms of each. This skill is critical to any higher level chemistry class. Stoichiometry, balancing equations, proportions, molar ratios, etc… Whatever you want to call it. The worksheet focuses mostly on subscript (or lack thereof), parentheses (single), and elements that show up more than one in a formula. I do not cover coefficients (though, these are covered in the video), or double parentheses. An answer key is included! As with all of my worksheets, I provide them in Word format, and encourage you to tweak them, and make them work for your situation.
Forces, Friction, and Newton's Laws Practice Worksheet
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Forces, Friction, and Newton's Laws Practice Worksheet

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In this worksheet, students are asked to demonstrate knowledge of a variety of forces and motion topics, including: -Speed -Combined forces (in one dimension) -Newton’s Laws -Friction The focus of the worksheet is the forces portion (Newton’s Laws, friction, combined forces), with only a few problems being over motion (speed). I have a separate worksheet that focuses on speed (and acceleration). The worksheet includes an answer key, and is 19 questions long. There are no multiple choice questions, and all questions require at least a basic application of knowledge. I use this for my 7th grade classroom, but it would fit equally well in a freshman science class, or with small tweaks, a high school physics class.
Gravity and Friction (Air Resistance) Lab - VIDEO
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Gravity and Friction (Air Resistance) Lab - VIDEO

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This is a companion video to go with the lab of the same name. Use this video to see how the lab is done, or for students who need extension activities or a make-up opportunity. I’ve included a downloadable version of the video as a supporting document, allowing you to share the video PRIVATELY with students, such as via Google Classroom, or a private Youtube channel. The video is about 11 minutes long, and is 1080p, mp4 format.
Factors That Affect Friction Lab - BUNDLE
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Factors That Affect Friction Lab - BUNDLE

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This bundle includes both the lab directions/worksheet and the video of the lab. In this lab, students look at various factors that affect the frictional force between two objects: -Type of surface -Mass of objects -Type of friction -Surface area Materials Required: -Spring scale (1x, if data is collected as a class…otherwise, 1x per student group) -Block of wood (I used a 1ft piece of sanded 2x4) -Some method of attaching the scale to the block (to pull it) -A piece of sandpaper -Wooden dowels -An object with roughly 2-3x the mass of the block (heavy book?) I use a digital force gauge, connected to my computer, in conjunction with a camera, to collect the data from the lab as a CLASS, so everyone’s working from the same data set. This could also be done with an analog spring scale, and a camera. It just depends on whether you want them to collect their OWN data or not. An answer key is included. The data is specific to the lab, as I completed it in my classroom, but it gives you an idea of what the results SHOULD look like, relative to the factors being tested in the lab. I also have a video of the lab available, should materials not be available, students need to make up the lab, or you’re a teacher that would like to see how the lab works. I use this lab in my 7th grade classroom, but it would work equally well in a higher level classroom, particularly, if students are pushed farther when it comes to defending answers with data from the lab, or creating more complex explanations of the results.
Metric Conversion Practice Worksheet
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Metric Conversion Practice Worksheet

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This worksheet includes many metric conversion problems for students to hone their skills. An answer key is included. I typically assign this as homework (after lots of practice in class), and give students free access to the answer key, so they can check their progress, and revisit, if needed. I use the “stairstep” method of metric conversion in my classroom, with great success (middle school). You’ll find my stairstep handout, as well as my “how-to” video in my store.
Foldable Paper Meter Stick
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Foldable Paper Meter Stick

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This is a foldable paper meter stick that I have my students create. They use it for learning to read a metric ruler, and to measure distances for various activities. I print the meter sticks on card stock, and have the kids store them in their binders. The zip file includes a PDF of the ruler (to print), as well as a video, describing how to cut out and put together the rulers. You’ll need: Scissors Clear Tape
Chemical Reactions - Ionic Bonding Charges
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Chemical Reactions - Ionic Bonding Charges

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In this worksheet, students are asked to identify the bonding charge of two reactants (single atoms, no polyatomic), then determine the resulting chemical formula. The reactions used are simple ionic bonding, to introduce the students to this basic chemistry concept. The worksheet includes 14 practice problems, as well as an answer key.
Informal Lab Report Sheet
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Informal Lab Report Sheet

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This basic lab report can be used generically with many labs. Students are given a problem to solve, or question to answer. They make a prediction, backing it up with observations, then complete the lab, collecting data and observations as they go. They then try to explain the science behind their observations using information from their notes, or prior experiences. Finally, they’re asked to explain what the investigation proves, again, backing it up with observations from the lab.
Mixing Colors of Light + Effect on Color of Object
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Mixing Colors of Light + Effect on Color of Object

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This item includes two demonstrations for a unit on light: Mixing Colors of Light In this demonstration, student volunteers will show that mixing the three primary colors of light yield unexpected results. Time: 20 min Materials: Projector, 3 small mirrors The Effect of Light Color on an Object In this demonstration, the teacher will show that the color of a light source can greatly affect the perceived color of an object, such as department stores using bulbs that cause skin to look more tan, or jewelry stores using bulbs that make their gems sparkle. Time: 10 min Materials: Projector, various colors of construction paper The file includes instructions for both demonstrations, as well as two images, which are used in the demos.
Static Charge - Short Creative Writing
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Static Charge - Short Creative Writing

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A RAFT is a short writing assignment where students take on a ROLE, address a certain AUDIENCE, in a particular FORMAT, about a given TOPIC. For my science class, since my focus is on the SCIENCE, rather than the writing, I keep the format simple…a letter. In this RAFT, students play the role of an everyday object, and explain how static charges affect their interaction with objects around them. Students will have two RAFTs to choose from. Included is an example of a class brainstorming session that should give you an idea of what that might look like, as well as an example RAFT, about a different science topic, so you can see how a RAFT comes together. I typically score mine in this fashion: Accurate and complete science content = 75% Correct grammar/spelling = 20% Proper format = 5%