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Whole class reading lessons
20 Whole class reading lessons - Who Let the Gods Out?
GregTeacher2015GregTeacher2015

20 Whole class reading lessons - Who Let the Gods Out?

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A series of 20 ready-to-teach complete notebook lessons about the fantastic book Who Let The Gods Out? This resource contains 10 notebooks each comprising of 2 lessons as well as all accompanying resources. My slides will guide you from start to finish through this wonderfully engaging book that the children will love! The slides are intended to be taught to the whole class using the increasingly popular whole class reading approach. Each lesson usually takes the same format: Starter/ opening task on whiteboards Pre-teach vocabulary that will come up in the reading read the book with the class - all page numbers provided (I like to use a mixture of Teacher reading, partner reading, choral reading, and echo reading) A short input/ modelling before the task Task slide - various activities including, annotated posters, speed reading challenges and themed comprehension questions Note: To maintain variety, slides sometimes slightly differ from this format. The series of lessons is appropriate for Year 4 to Year 6 children but can easily be adapted. All lessons are linked to the English Reading National Curriculum and many focus on the content domains from the reading SATS papers. Many tasks in the lessons expose and teach children common vocabulary from the Reading SATS papers but in an engaging and friendly manner (Vocabulary like the following: impression, effect, according to the text etc.) Learning objectives include: predicting, summarising, retrieving information, inference, finding finding evidence to justify an answer as well as reading fluently with expression and intonation. Many of the tasks include differentiation. I use a green, yellow, red chilli system, where children start on either green or yellow and then can move on to the more challenging red chilli. Please be aware that the 20 lessons focus in on certain points in the book and much of the actual reading of the book would need to be read outside of the lesson time. I have included a slide for each lesson that clearly states which pages should be read before the next lesson. This helps keep the pace of reading up and maintains the children’s interest. The children in my class loved practising their reading skills using WLTGO and my slides. I’m sure other children will also!
20 Whole Class Reading Lessons Kaspar: Prince of Cats
GregTeacher2015GregTeacher2015

20 Whole Class Reading Lessons Kaspar: Prince of Cats

(0)
A series of 20 ready-to-teach complete notebook lessons about the engaging book Kaspar: Prince of Cats. This resource contains 10 notebooks each comprising of 2 lessons as well as all accompanying resources. My slides will guide you from start to finish through this wonderfully enjoyable book that the children will love. The slides are intended to be taught to the whole class. Each lesson usually takes the same format: Starter/ opening task on whiteboards Pre-teach vocabulary that will come up in the reading Read the book with the class - all page numbers provided (I like to use a mixture of Teacher reading, partner reading, choral reading, and echo reading) A short input/ modelling before the task Task slide - various activities including, annotated drawings, themed comprehension questions and creating a Job advert. Note: To maintain variety, slides sometimes slightly differ from this format. The series of lessons is appropriate for Year 4 to Year 6 children but can easily be adapted. All lessons are linked to the English Reading National Curriculum and many focus on the content domains from the reading SATS papers. Some tasks in the lessons expose and teach children common vocabulary from the Reading SATS papers but in an engaging and friendly manner (Vocabulary like the following: impression, effect, according to the text etc. Learning objectives include: predicting, summarising, retrieving information, inference and finding evidence to justify an answer. Many of the tasks include differentiation. I use a green, yellow, red chilli system, where children start on either green or yellow and then can move on to the more challenging red chilli.