The British Monarchy

The British Monarchy

This resource contains a PowerPoint presentation about the British Monarchy and the role of the Queen in the UK. A note-taking handout accompanies the presentation. The final slides of the presentation provide references for further reading and research. This is designed to be used in ESOL-type classes where students are learning about British culture but it could be used with other learners who are studying this topic. Following the presentation, it could lead onto a debate about the role of the Monarchy , or an argumentative essay on this topic.
Jayne890
ESL listening exercise: You can say that again

ESL listening exercise: You can say that again

This activity is aimed at upper-intermediate to advanced learners of English. It provides a worksheet for students to use and complete whilst they watch The Two Ronnies You Can Say That Again sketch. Due to copyright reasons, I cannot provide a link to an official video of the sketch but you can buy the DVDs for class use (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00jg78q/products). (Of course if you search on YouTube, multiple unofficial versions can easily be found.) The video clip may need to be shown several times, depending upon the level of the students (pausing the video at key places may help with lower level students.) The activity requires a high level of listening skill and involves students noting down particular phrases in the dialogue where a man named Bert (played by Ronnie Corbett) hesitates when speaking, leaving it up a man named Charlie (played by Ronnie Barker) to finish off his sentences. As many of the words and expressions used in the dialogue are idiomatic, related to British culture and some involving innuendo, there might be a lot of new vocabulary for your students. The answer-sheet has been provided for the teacher to use to offer visuals where possible to assist with this. Following a discussion, the answers could be projected at the front of the classroom. If age-appropriate to your class, the innuendos could also be explored. Due to copyright issues, I have not included the script as part of this resource but it can easily be found by searching online and could be used in class for further study and understanding of the video. As a follow-on activity, students could create their own sketches to perform to the class.
Jayne890
Housing discussion

Housing discussion

This is aimed at international students learning English. It contains 22 images of types of houses with their name underneath e.g. 'terraced house,' 'bungalow,' 'mansion' etc. It includes some unusual types of housing such as a 'canal boat,' 'treehouse' and 'lighthouse.' The images are intended to generate discussion around housing and students could be allocated a few pictures per group to discuss and then feed back to the rest of the class. Suggested questions for discussion are also included. The activity could be taken further to discuss issues such as housing policy in different countries and what governments are doing to ensure everyone is houses. It also lends itself to further research around the cost of houses in different countries and regions and the economics of renting versus buying, plus cultural differences around this.
Jayne890
Map activity: Great Britain, the UK, Ireland or the British Isles?

Map activity: Great Britain, the UK, Ireland or the British Isles?

This map activity includes a handout for students which asks them to label the maps. The accompanying teacher's presentation with the answers could be used to present information first or to use afterwards to clarify answers, or both, depending upon the prior knowledge of the students. It could be used in Geography classes, or with ESOL learners who have recently moved to the UK.
Jayne890
Useful websites for improving your English

Useful websites for improving your English

This is a handout aimed at international students in an academic environment. It lists some recommended websites for them for improving their English. Either on their own for homework/directed learning, or in a computer class, they visit each website and make notes on what they like and dislike about each one and give them a rating out of 10 for their usefulness. Students can then compare notes by discussing in small groups. They can also recommend other websites to each other that they have found useful. The class could even vote for their favourite website or design their own handout or guide for other students.
Jayne890
ESL speaking prompts: leisure, sports and the arts

ESL speaking prompts: leisure, sports and the arts

This resource is aimed at international students learning English and provides some visual prompts of hobbies and activities as well as questions on this topic e.g. 'How much free time do people have in the UK? '; 'Do they go to performances/art galleries/museums etc.? ' It could be used as a gentle introduction to talking about leisure specifically within the UK, for ESOL/citizenship-related classes. It could also be used as a fun way to introduce one of the IELTS speaking topics.
Jayne890
Pinterest board evaluation

Pinterest board evaluation

This reflective activity can be used in a computer class with students who are using Pinterest for projects or as part of staff training for those who are looking to use Pinterest for educational purposes. The worksheet invites the participant to find a 'board' (a group of pins, organised by some kind of topic) on Pinterest and to evaluate it - first by themselves and then with others. A short glossary of terms is included for those new to Pinterest.
Jayne890
The British Monarchy

The British Monarchy

This resource contains a PowerPoint presentation about the British Monarchy and the role of the Queen in the UK. A note-taking handout accompanies the presentation. The final slides of the presentation provide references for further reading and research. This is designed to be used in ESOL-type classes where students are learning about British culture but it could be used with other learners who are studying this topic. Following the presentation, it could lead onto a debate about the role of the Monarchy , or an argumentative essay on this topic.
Jayne890
ESL listening exercise: Four Candles

ESL listening exercise: Four Candles

This activity is aimed at upper-intermediate to advanced learners of English. It provides a worksheet for students to use and complete whilst they watch The Two Ronnies Four Candles sketch. Due to copyright reasons, I cannot provide a link to an official video of the sketch but you can buy the DVDs for class use (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00jg78q/products). (Of course if you search on YouTube, multiple unofficial versions can easily be found.) The video clip may need to be shown several times, depending upon the level of the students. (Pausing the video at key places may help with lower level students.) The activity requires a high level of listening skill and involves students trying to distinguish between what the shopkeeper thinks the customer wants, and what the customer actually wants. As many of the words are hardware-related, there might be a lot of new vocabulary for your students: the visual aspect of the items being produced in the video should help with this, along with the answer-sheet which has been provided for the teacher to use. Following a discussion, the answers could be projected at the front of the classroom - I have provided images to illustrate all of the different items (all of the images were 'labelled for reuse' on Google Images). Again due to copyright issues, I have not included the script as part of this resource but it can easily be found by searching online and could be used in class for further study and understanding of the video. Although the sketch is dated now and shops these days are self-service, the problems with miscommunication still exist and it is still as funny today! As a follow-on activity, students could consider words which sound similar but have completely different meanings. They could then create their own sketches to perform to the class.
Jayne890
ESL speaking prompts: cities and villages

ESL speaking prompts: cities and villages

This resource is aimed at international students learning English and provides some visual prompts of cities and villages as well as questions on this topic e.g. 'Do you think it’s better to live in a modern flat or an old house? Why?' It could be used as a gentle introduction to talking about housing or as a starter for writing an essay on the advantages and disadvantages of housing. It could also be used as a fun way to introduce one of the IELTS speaking topics.
Jayne890
ESL listening exercise: You can say that again

ESL listening exercise: You can say that again

This activity is aimed at upper-intermediate to advanced learners of English. It provides a worksheet for students to use and complete whilst they watch The Two Ronnies You Can Say That Again sketch. Due to copyright reasons, I cannot provide a link to an official video of the sketch but you can buy the DVDs for class use (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00jg78q/products). (Of course if you search on YouTube, multiple unofficial versions can easily be found.) The video clip may need to be shown several times, depending upon the level of the students (pausing the video at key places may help with lower level students.) The activity requires a high level of listening skill and involves students noting down particular phrases in the dialogue where a man named Bert (played by Ronnie Corbett) hesitates when speaking, leaving it up a man named Charlie (played by Ronnie Barker) to finish off his sentences. As many of the words and expressions used in the dialogue are idiomatic, related to British culture and some involving innuendo, there might be a lot of new vocabulary for your students. The answer-sheet has been provided for the teacher to use to offer visuals where possible to assist with this. Following a discussion, the answers could be projected at the front of the classroom. If age-appropriate to your class, the innuendos could also be explored. Due to copyright issues, I have not included the script as part of this resource but it can easily be found by searching online and could be used in class for further study and understanding of the video. As a follow-on activity, students could create their own sketches to perform to the class.
Jayne890
British culture: politeness at work

British culture: politeness at work

This activity is aimed at international staff working in the UK in a professional environment such as an office or university. The resource contains 2 pages of scenarios which the staff are invited to consider and decide how they will respond in a polite manner. The scenarios are based on real life situations at work, using email or in meetings. They could be used individually or in small groups and responses to emails could actually be written and sent to each other; likewise, scenarios for meetings could be acted out. Feedback and discussion could then follow. The activity could be used following instruction around how to formulate polite requests and so on. A list of useful resources relating to this is included.
Jayne890
Defining the industry environment matching activity

Defining the industry environment matching activity

This worksheet activity provides a definition of the industry environment, which is then broken down into smaller useful phrases, such as 'economic cycles,' 'regulatory conditions' etc. Students match the terms with their definitions. An answer sheet is provided for the teacher to use during feedback. This activity is designed as a starter and the class could then explore examples of each useful term e.g. what kinds of lifestyle shifts are happening how? How have people's lifestyles changed in the last...10, 20, 50, 100...years?
Jayne890
Presentation skills: business pitches

Presentation skills: business pitches

This resource is an activity instruction sheet for students, who will work in small groups to pitch an idea for a product which is not on the market, 'Dragon's-Den' style. Prior to the activity, you may wish to show a clip from Dragon's Den, particularly for students from other countries who may not have heard of it. See: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006vq92 for clips. You may also show examples of elevator pitches on YouTube e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zumkSeC2u3M and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6O98o2FRHw and get students to discuss what makes a good pitch. The students need time to think of ideas and to prepare their pitches so you will probably allocate a large chunk of the class to this. Students could be provided with flipchart paper and pens to assist with this and/or they could have access to computers to create presentations. After the allocated preparation time, each group takes it in turns to present their pitch. For each pitch, you might like to have a panel of 'dragons' from the class who will judge the pitch and decide whether they will support their product or not. Fake money could be used to make this more realistic and the panel could change each time a new pitch is presented so that all students get the chance to be dragons as well as pitching their ideas. The class as a whole could then discuss which pitches they thought were best and why. Depending on how many students you have in the class and how many groups there are, this activity with introduction and feedback could take several lessons. This type of activity could be used as an assessment, either in groups as this activity has been set up, or on an individual basis.
Jayne890
Presentation skills: academic

Presentation skills: academic

This resource is an activity instruction sheet for students, who will work individually to prepare a presentation on an academic subject of their choice. It is aimed at international students learning English for Academic Purposes, who will be studying different degree subjects at a university but it could also be used in an ESOL class in a college, where the students are studying other subjects. Prior to the activity, you might like to elicit from the students what makes a good presentation and you could also show a YouTube video such as: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ze3IiHsHuIA The students need time to prepare their presentations so you will probably either allocate a large chunk of the class for this or set it for homework/directed learning to allow adequate time for research. Students could have access to computers to assist with this. After the allocated preparation time, each student takes it in turns to present. The whole class must be prepared to listen carefully and to ask questions when they are listening, and to be ready to answer questions when they are presenting. Students could be encouraged to give feedback to each other on their presentations - this could be done anonymously via written feedback or via an online voting system if eliciting verbal feedback is difficult. Depending on how many students you have in the class, this activity with introduction and feedback could take several lessons. This type of activity could also be used as an assessment around speaking skills.
Jayne890
Speed referencing

Speed referencing

This classroom activity is aimed at students who are getting to grips with academic referencing and is designed to make learning about referencing fun. Before using this activity, ensure that students understand the concept of referencing and are familiar with the type of referencing and related conventions used by your institution. To use this activity, print off several copies of this resource and laminate each sheet. (As a guide, the 2 sheets given here are suitable for 1 small group of 2-3 students, so you will need as many copies as you have groups). Use a guillotine to create small cards and put them into packs for each group (I find that using elastic bands or envelopes helps with this). In small groups of 2-3, students have to order the cards given to show the information required in a reference for: a book, a chapter or essay in an edited book, a web page, a journal article, a blog, an electronic image, a newspaper or magazine article, an online report, a TV or radio programme and a conference paper. It may be a good idea for students to practise first, referring to the reference guidelines of your institution, before trying to do it with no guidance - at this point, egg timers or an online timer could be used to see which group can organise the references correctly as quickly as possible. The teacher could shout out which one to do e.g. a book for each round to make it easier and more focused than doing all of the references at the same time.
Jayne890
Negotiating deals

Negotiating deals

This activity is aimed at international students learning English and specifically around Business English / negotiating language for intermediate learners. There are 4 scenarios to be role-played in pairs. For each scenario, there is an accompanying handout of information/images to assist with the role play.
Jayne890
Housing discussion

Housing discussion

This is aimed at international students learning English. It contains 22 images of types of houses with their name underneath e.g. 'terraced house,' 'bungalow,' 'mansion' etc. It includes some unusual types of housing such as a 'canal boat,' 'treehouse' and 'lighthouse.' The images are intended to generate discussion around housing and students could be allocated a few pictures per group to discuss and then feed back to the rest of the class. Suggested questions for discussion are also included. The activity could be taken further to discuss issues such as housing policy in different countries and what governments are doing to ensure everyone is houses. It also lends itself to further research around the cost of houses in different countries and regions and the economics of renting versus buying, plus cultural differences around this.
Jayne890
Dissertation help

Dissertation help

This bundle includes activities around key elements of an undergraduate dissertation. It is designed to assist with the structure and layout of the work as well as to influence the depth of content required in each chapter. Laying out your research focuses on how research is presented. Students could work in small groups in class with some past dissertations sourced from the university library. Students look through the examples in front of them and discuss what each section contains, thereby coming up with their own definitions for each chapter. The handout allows space for more notes on each section of the dissertation and discussion as a whole class to compare notes may follow. Writing Abstracts and Introductions, the Literature Reviews activity and Writing Methodologies are activities which can be used in conjunction with a mark scheme / assessment grid from your university, where students allocate a grade to each example given in groups and then justify their grade to other groups of students in the class. The Writing Introductions diagram is supplementary material for students to refer to on their own. The Quantitative data analysis activity provides small groups of students with raw data, perhaps with each group focusing on a different question. They discuss any problems with the data and how they would analyse it and present the results. They then present their findings to the rest of the class. The Academic Referencing activity could be set as directed learning following an introduction to referencing at your institution. It enables students to visit the library and/or do research online to write down different examples of referencing. A completed example has been included to give an idea. The activity could lead on to using referencing software, such as RefME.
Jayne890
Google maps exploration

Google maps exploration

This worksheet can be used as homework/directed learning or in a class with access to computers/the internet. It explores the functionality of Google Maps and allows students to improve their IT skills. The resource comprises of a worksheet with answers.
Jayne890
Writing Methodologies

Writing Methodologies

This activity is aimed at undergraduate students embarking on dissertations. The worksheet can be used for private study but is best used in the classroom context, where it will generate discussion around Methodologies, allowing students to look at some examples and compare them, highlighting areas for improvement as well as noting useful academic writing styles, which they can then consider when writing up their own research projects. This activity could be used in conjunction with a mark scheme / assessment grid from your university, where students allocate a grade to each example given in groups and then justify their grade to other groups of students in the class.
Jayne890
Literature reviews activity

Literature reviews activity

This activity is aimed at undergraduate students embarking on dissertations. The worksheet can be used for private study but is best used in the classroom context, where it will generate discussion around Literature Reviews, allowing students to look at some examples and compare them, highlighting areas for improvement as well as noting useful academic writing styles, which they can then consider when writing up their own research projects. This activity could be used in conjunction with a mark scheme / assessment grid from your university, where students allocate a grade to each example given in groups and then justify their grade to other groups of students in the class.
Jayne890
Pitching your research

Pitching your research

This resource is an activity instruction sheet aimed at university-level students embarking on research. It could be used at the start of a mini-research project or in the early stages of a dissertation. The students work individually to prepare a short pitch on their proposed research topic. The students need time to prepare their presentations so you will probably either allocate a large chunk of the class for this or set it for homework/directed learning to allow adequate time for research. Students could have access to computers to assist with this. After the allocated preparation time, each student takes it in turns to present. The whole class must be prepared to listen carefully and to ask questions when they are listening, and to be ready to answer questions when they are presenting. Students could be encouraged to give feedback to each other on their pitches - this could be done anonymously via written feedback or via an online voting system if eliciting verbal feedback is difficult. Depending on how many students you have in the class, this activity with introduction and feedback could take several lessons. This type of activity could also be used as an assessment around speaking skills/presenting research ideas.
Jayne890
Writing Abstracts and Introductions

Writing Abstracts and Introductions

This activity is aimed at undergraduate students embarking on dissertations. The worksheet can be used for private study but is best used in the classroom context, where it will generate discussion around Abstracts and Introductions, allowing students to look at some examples and compare them, highlighting areas for improvement as well as noting useful academic writing styles, which they can then consider when writing up their own research projects. This activity could be used in conjunction with a mark scheme / assessment grid from your university, where students allocate a grade to each example given in groups and then justify their grade to other groups of students in the class.
Jayne890