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We’re My Change CIC and we’ve been taking workshops and clubs into South East London schools since 2017. It’s all been about getting kids more familiar with their food and making healthier choices. Now we’ve created a food education programme – Food Changers – where kids get a chance to really see inside what they’re eating.

We’re My Change CIC and we’ve been taking workshops and clubs into South East London schools since 2017. It’s all been about getting kids more familiar with their food and making healthier choices. Now we’ve created a food education programme – Food Changers – where kids get a chance to really see inside what they’re eating.
Game: Digestion
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Game: Digestion

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The aim of this is to educate the learners about the digestive system and therefore demonstrate the pathway of food through the body. The number of parts can be reduced for younger ages and naming them more simple words like mouth, throat, belly, etc. As the game increases through the levels more detail can be applied to each part of the game referencing what happens in the body (in the mouth, we chew the food to smaller sizes for it to be swallowed). The space is divided up into a number of sections, each one separated by the same colour cones and called a part of the body in the digestive system. Learners start at one end of the space (mouth) and finish at the opposite end (large intestine). The game changes through the ages and starts off as a circuit training style game with the younger aged learners and can finish as a tag game, however the space needs to be large enough for all learners running and not colliding.
Game: Chicken Run
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Game: Chicken Run

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This game can be used when using lessons based on the pink/protein food group or discussing the welfare of animals. With the younger aged learner, it is essential for the learners to understand where eggs come from and what animals we normally use for eggs. As learners get older it may be useful to talk about the various types of eggs (free range, caged, barn) that can be bought from the supermarket and differences between them. The space consists of a coned square called the barn (white cones) in the middle of the space. The game starts with the teacher calling ‘chicken run’, when learners get tagged by the farmer they must go into the barn and wait to be freed by another chicken with a high-5. Encourage the learners to be honest and stand on the edge of the barn when tagged so learners are not bumping into each other when in the barn.
Game: Veg Dodge
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Game: Veg Dodge

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This game encourages learners to work as a team in a competitive setting. Learners will create fun team names associated with a particular vegetable that is relevant to their team colour, e.g. yellow bibs = super swedes, red bibs = terrible tomatoes. The game can be progressed through all of the years, however it is important to identify clear rules so learners are safe when the game is being played. The game can include lots of information about different vegetables so learners can learn about what makes that vegetable healthy for us.
Game: 5-A-Day
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Game: 5-A-Day

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This game can reinforce the learning around portion sizes and numbers of fruits and vegetables to eat every day. Most will understand that 5-a-day is a common initiative set up to encourage people to eat a minimum of 5 portions every day. However it is important to note that eating 5 different colours of fruits and vegetables will provide even more health benefits as it gives us a range of different vitamins and minerals.
Game: Sugar Rush
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Game: Sugar Rush

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This game focuses on foods that are high in sugar and learners being able to identify whether a food is or is not high in sugar. It is important during the game that the learners fully understand that some foods provide different amounts of sugar than others, like dark chocolate and milk chocolate, and some sweet foods contain sweeteners. With this in mind, the foods chosen during this game should be very carefully selected to avoid confusion. The space is set up with red cones (high) at one end of the space and green (low) at the opposite end. There needs to be enough space between each set of cones for the children to move around.
Game: Make A Meal
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Game: Make A Meal

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This game is very versatile and can be used for all ages. There are also lots of different adaptations at each level to develop the learners understanding on all components of the Eatwell Guide. This game requires an additional resource of food cards that just show the foods on them. These cards must be small enough to go under the cones, whether they are folded up or even have some blank cards so learners do not get the opportunity to look into the cones and see what ones have a card under. The space is set up where teams line up behind a team cone (black outline) at one end of the space and lots of different coloured cones are randomly placed at the other end. These cones will have a food card underneath each cone and learners must take turns to run up to these, have a look and then run back, tagging the next learner to go. This process is repeated until all food cards/cones are gone.
Game: Traffic Lights
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Game: Traffic Lights

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This game has lots of scope between ages as it can be easily developed using more equipment. For the younger aged learners, the message is the difference in the colours, which means high, medium and low. Younger learners will not necessarily be aware of foods being high or low in salt, sugar or fat, so using the tastes and senses is crucial to build this knowledge. The older aged learners can start to explore which foods are through the way they taste and packaging. These learners need to know that the foods that are high, we only have sparingly and in small amounts. The space is set up with cones representing traffic lights with red cones at one end of the space, green at the opposite end and orange in the middle. Enough space needs to be between each set of cones as the learners will be moving around the space.
Poster: Food Shopping Card
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Poster: Food Shopping Card

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This card shows if the fat, sugar and salt are either high, medium or low in a particular food package. There is a specific focus on these nutrients, mainly as these are the ones we need to reduce the amount we eat.
Game: Beans
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Game: Beans

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While discussing the pink/protein food groups, this game relates to the various types of beans available. Some of which are made up for the purposes of younger aged children that require appropriate movements (runner, pea, baked) and some are more complex that is recommended for older learners (black-eyed, kidney) as technique is very important in being safe. The space consists of a coned square in a large area that needs to be large enough so learners are not running into each other. Alternatively, the cones do not have to be used if using a smaller area like a hall.
Count in 2's
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Count in 2's

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Look at the foods below and count how many there are of each. Can you name the food and write how many there are on the black line?
Game: Fruits And Veggies
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Game: Fruits And Veggies

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This game will look to expand on the learners understanding of different fruits and vegetables, mainly the colours and names. As the learners progress through the levels, they should be able to demonstrate why it is important to eat a variety of colours. At these levels, less common fruits and vegetables can be called out with challenges for learners to spot in the supermarkets. The space is set up with a range coloured cones, all spread out 2 metres apart. Learners will move around the space in a way instructed by the coach and quickly stand next to the coloured cone identified by the teacher. It is important for learners not to push at cones, slide to the cones and to be sensible while playing the game.
Game: Greengrocers
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Game: Greengrocers

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This game can be used for all ages and is used to develop teamwork and learners knowledge about different fruits and vegetables. Explain that in addition to supermarkets, greengrocers are essential shops that sell mostly local and organic fruits and vegetables. Learners will stand behind their team cone (black outline) and run one at a time to the cones at the other end of the space (the greengrocers). They can only take 1 cone and take it back to their team, placing the cone next/on to their team cone. Encourage the learners to high-5 the next learner. The team at the end of the game with the most cones are the winners.
Game: Animals
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Game: Animals

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This game will hopefully extend the learners knowledge about different animals and allow them to be creative when they mimic that animal. The teacher can use animals that have been discussed in the lessons and ask for suggestions during breaks to get learners input into different animals. Cones should be set up in a large square with enough room for all to move around without being too close. If this game is being played in a hall, the cones would not be necessary.
Game: Fruit Salad
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Game: Fruit Salad

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This game encourages learners to be creative while thinking about a healthy dessert, a fruit salad. Each fruit will be attached to an exercise, like a jumping jack, push up, etc and also prompts learners to think about portion size as the larger the fruit, the less of it we would need to eat. Each team will line up behind their team cone (black outline) with 3-5 cones of the same colour in front of them in a straight line. The teacher will explain why a fruit salad is a healthy option for a dessert and provide their individual fruits of choice. The learners will run to the first cone and perform a number of exercise repetitions, go to the next cone with one fewer repetitions and repeat the process until they get to the last cone (ideally ending on 1 repetition). When they return to their team, learners will need to make sure they tag the next person in the line.
Count in 4's
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Count in 4's

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Look at the foods below and count how many there are of each. Can you name the food and write how many there are on the black line?
Count in 3's
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Count in 3's

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Look at the foods below and count how many there are of each. Can you name the food and write how many there are on the black line?
Game: Capture The Apple
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Game: Capture The Apple

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This is a strategy game and does not necessarily develop knowledge about any aspect of nutrition. The rules are similar to that of the game - capture the flag, with two teams that start at opposing ends of the space separated by a line of white cones (black outline). At the opposite end of the space there is the team’s apple (colour ball), which is surrounded by a circle of cones (orchard). Each team must get their apple back into their half to win the game. Only attacking players can enter their orchard where their apple is and can only be tagged in the opponents half. If someone is tagged in the opponents half, they must stand still and are freed by a high-5 from a player on their team. If they are tagged with the ball, the player must drop the ball and a defending player can return it to the circle.