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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
AQA new specification-Cell division (mitosis)-B2.1
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AQA new specification-Cell division (mitosis)-B2.1

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Cell division (mitosis) lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and worksheet. AQA spec link: 4.1.2.1 & 4.1.2.2 Relevant chapter: B2 Cell division. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 26-27 Specification requires students to know the following; The nucleus of a cell contains chromosomes made of DNA molecules. Each chromosome carries a large number of genes. In body cells the chromosomes are normally found in pairs. Cells divide in a series of stages called the cell cycle. Students should be able to describe the stages of the cell cycle, including mitosis. During the cell cycle the genetic material is doubled and then divided into two identical cells. Before a cell can divide it needs to grow and increase the number of sub-cellular structures such as ribosomes and mitochondria. The DNA replicates to form two copies of each chromosome. In mitosis one set of chromosomes is pulled to each end of the cell and the nucleus divides. Finally the cytoplasm and cell membranes divide to form two identical cells. Students need to understand the three overall stages of the cell cycle but do not need to know the different phases of the mitosis stage. Cell division by mitosis is important in the growth and development of multi-cellular organisms. Students should be able to recognise and describe situations in given contexts where mitosis is occurring.
AQA new specification-Exchanging materials-B1.10
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AQA new specification-Exchanging materials-B1.10

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Exchanging materials lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet, and homework (with MS) AQA spec link: 4.1.3.1 Relevant chapter: B1 Cell structure and transport. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 22-23 Specification requires students to know the following; A single-celled organism has a relatively large surface area to volume ratio. This allows sufficient transport of molecules into and out of the cell to meet the needs of the organism. Students should be able to calculate and compare surface area to volume ratios. Students should be able to explain the need for exchange surfaces and a transport system in multicellular organisms in terms of surface area to volume ratio. Students should be able to explain how the small intestine and lungs in mammals, gills in fish, and the roots and leaves in plants, are adapted for exchanging materials. In multicellular organisms, surfaces and organ systems are specialised for exchanging materials. This is to allow sufficient molecules to be transported into and out of cells for the organism’s needs. The effectiveness of an exchange surface is increased by: •• having a large surface area •• a membrane that is thin, to provide a short diffusion path •• (in animals) having an efficient blood supply •• (in animals, for gaseous exchange) being ventilated.
AQA new specification-Infertility treatments-B11.8
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AQA new specification-Infertility treatments-B11.8

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Infertility treatments lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet and practice questions with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. *Note-For higher tier only* AQA spec link:5.3.6 Relevant chapter: B11.8-Infertility treatments . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 174-175. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the use of hormones in modern reproductive technologies to treat infertility. This includes giving FSH and LH in a ‘fertility drug’ to a woman. She may then become pregnant in the normal way. In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) treatment: • IVF involves giving a mother FSH and LH to stimulate the maturation of several eggs. • The eggs are collected from the mother and fertilised by sperm from the father in the laboratory. • The fertilised eggs develop into embryos. • At the stage when they are tiny balls of cells, one or two embryos are inserted into the mother’s uterus (womb). Although fertility treatment gives a woman the chance to have a baby of her own: • it is very emotionally and physically stressful • the success rates are not high • it can lead to multiple births which are a risk to both the babies and the mother.
AQA new specification-Growth and differentiation-B2.2
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AQA new specification-Growth and differentiation-B2.2

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Growth and differentiation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded video, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.4 Relevant chapter: B2 Cell division. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 28-29 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the importance of cell differentiation. As an organism develops, cells differentiate to form different types of cells. • Most types of animal cell differentiate at an early stage. ••Many types of plant cells retain the ability to differentiate throughout life. In mature animals, cell division is mainly restricted to repair and replacement. As a cell differentiates it acquires different sub-cellular structures to enable it to carry out a certain function. It has become a specialised cell.
AQA new specification-Diet, exercise and disease-B7.4
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AQA new specification-Diet, exercise and disease-B7.4

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Diet, exercise and disease lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video's, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.2.2.6 Relevant chapter: B7 Non-communicable diseases. AQA Biology combined textbook-Page 104-105 Students are required to know the following; • discuss the human and financial cost of these non-communicable diseases to an individual, a local community, a nation, or globally • explain the effect of lifestyle factors including diet, alcohol, and smoking on the incidence of non-communicable diseases at local, national, and global levels. Risk factors are linked to an increased rate of a disease. They can be: • aspects of a person’s lifestyle • substances in the person’s body or environment. A causal mechanism has been proven for some risk factors, but not in others. • The effects of diet and exercise on cardiovascular disease. • Obesity as a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. Many diseases are caused by the interaction of a number of factors. Students should be able to understand the principles of sampling as applied to scientific data in terms of risk factors. Students should be able to translate information between graphical and numerical forms; and extract and interpret information from charts, graphs and tables in terms of risk factors. Students should be able to use a scatter diagram to identify a correlation between two variables in terms of risk factors.
AQA new specification-The artificial control of fertility (contraception)-B11.7
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AQA new specification-The artificial control of fertility (contraception)-B11.7

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The artificial control of fertility (contraception) lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video and practice questions (homework) with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link:5.3.5 Relevant chapter: B11.7-The artificial control of fertility . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 172-173. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to evaluate the different hormonal and non-hormonal methods of contraception. Fertility can be controlled by a variety of hormonal and non-hormonal methods of contraception. These include: • oral contraceptives that contain hormones to inhibit FSH production so that no eggs mature • injection, implant, or skin patch of slow release progesterone to inhibit the maturation and release of eggs for a number of months or years • barrier methods such as condoms and diaphragms which prevent the sperm reaching an egg • intrauterine devices which prevent the implantation of an embryo or release a hormone • spermicidal agents which kill or disable sperm • abstaining from intercourse when an egg may be in the oviduct • surgical methods of male and female sterilisation.
AQA new specification-Controlling body temperature (Thermoregulation)-B12
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AQA new specification-Controlling body temperature (Thermoregulation)-B12

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Thermoregulation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). This is a printer friendly resource it includes an: embedded video, slide animations and a mini exam question. AQA spec link: 5.2.4 Relevant chapter: B12-Homeostasis in action. ( Note: This topic is for BIOLOGY only not for combined science students). AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 182-183 *The new specification requires students to know the following; Body temperature is monitored andcontrolled by the thermoregulatory centre in the brain. The thermoregulatory centre contains receptors sensitive to the temperature of the blood. The skin contains temperature receptorsand sends nervous impulses to the thermoregulatory centre. If the body temperature is too high, blood vessels dilate (vasodilation) and sweat is produced from the sweat glands.Both these mechanisms cause a transfer of energy from the skin to the environment. If the body temperature is too low, blood vessels constrict (vasoconstriction), sweating stops, and skeletal muscles contract (shiver). Students should be able to explain how these mechanisms lower or raise body temperature in a given context.
AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4
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AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4

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DNA and the genome lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.4 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 202-203. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the structure of DNA and define genome. The genetic material in the nucleus of a cell is composed of a chemical called DNA. DNA is a polymer made up of two strands forming a double helix. The DNA is contained in structures called chromosomes. A gene is a small section of DNA on a chromosome. Each gene codes for a particular sequence of amino acids, to make a specific protein. The genome of an organism is the entire genetic material of that organism. The whole human genome has now been studied and this will have great importance for medicine in the future. Students should be able to discuss the importance of understanding the human genome. This is limited to the: • search for genes linked to different types of disease • understanding and treatment of inherited disorders • use in tracing human migration patterns from the past.
AQA new specification-Removing waste products-B12.2
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AQA new specification-Removing waste products-B12.2

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Removing waste products lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations and worksheet. AQA spec link: 5.3.3 Relevant chapter: B12.2-Removing waste products . ( Note: This topic is for BIOLOGY only not for combined science students). AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 184-185 *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the effect on cells of osmotic changes in body fluids. Water leaves the body via the lungs during exhalation. Water, ions, and urea are lost from the skin in sweat. There is no control over water, ion, or urea loss by the lungs or skin. Excess water, ions, and urea are removed via the kidneys in the urine. If body cells lose or gain too much water by osmosis they do not function efficiently. The digestion of proteins from the diet results in excess amino acids which need to be excreted safely. In the liver these amino acids are deaminated to form ammonia. Ammonia is toxic and so it is immediately converted to urea for safe excretion.
AQA new specification-Plant responses and using plant hormones-B11.9-B11.10
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AQA new specification-Plant responses and using plant hormones-B11.9-B11.10

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This lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). I taught this lesson after the required germination practical. Includes: slide animations, embedded video and practice questions with mark scheme. This resource is for separates ONLY. *NOTE-using plant hormones-Higher tier only* AQA spec link: 5.4.1, 5.4.2 Relevant chapter: B11.9/10- AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 176-179 *The new specification requires students to know the following; Plants produce hormones to coordinate and control growth and responses: to light, phototropism; and gravity, gravitropism (geotropism). Unequal distributions of auxin cause unequal growth rates in plant roots and shoots. Gibberellins are important in initiating seed germination. Ethene controls cell division and ripening of fruits. The mechanisms of how gibberellins and ethene work are not required. Students should be able to describe the effects of some plant hormones and the different ways people use them to control plant growth. Plant growth hormones are used in agriculture and horticulture. Auxins are used as: • as weed killers • as rooting powders • for promoting growth in tissue culture. Ethene is used in the food industry to control ripening of fruit during storage and transport. Gibberellins can be used to: • end seed dormancy • promote flowering • increase fruit size.
AQA new specification-Dialysis-Artificial Kidney-B12.4
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AQA new specification-Dialysis-Artificial Kidney-B12.4

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Dialysis lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). It includes: embedded videos, slide animations and a worksheet. *Students only need to know the basic principles of dialysis-they do not need to know about haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.* AQA spec link: 5.3.3 Relevant chapter: B12-Homeostasis in action. ( Note: This topic is for BIOLOGY only not for combined science students). AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 188-189 *The new specification requires students to know the following; People who suffer from kidney failure may be treated by organ transplant or by using kidney dialysis. Students should know the basic principles of the operation of a dialysis machine.
AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6
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AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6

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Hormones and menstrual cycle lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet and practice questions with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. *Note-For higher tier only* AQA spec link:5.3.4 Relevant chapter: B11 -Hormonal coordination . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 170-171. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the interactions of FSH, oestrogen, LH and progesterone, in the control of the menstrual cycle. Students should be able to extract and interpret data from graphs showing hormone levels during the menstrual cycle.
AQA new specification-Kidney transplants-B12.5
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AQA new specification-Kidney transplants-B12.5

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Kidney transplant lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations and a video. AQA spec link:5.3.3 Relevant chapter: B12.5-Kidney transplants . ( Note: This topic is for BIOLOGY only not for combined science students). AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 187-188 *The new specification requires students to know the following; People who suffer from kidney failure may be treated by organ transplant or by using kidney dialysis. Students should know the basic principles of dialysis.
AQA new specification-Human defence response-B5.9
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AQA new specification-Human defence response-B5.9

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This lesson has been created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my combined/additional science class (Year 9-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet, quiz, practice exam questions and answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is suitable for separate science students. AQA spec link: Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 90-91. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the non-specific defence systems of the human body against pathogens, including the: • skin • nose • trachea and bronchi • stomach. Students should be able to explain the role of the immune system in the defence against disease. If a pathogen enters the body the immune system tries to destroy the pathogen. White blood cells help to defend against pathogens by: • phagocytosis • antibody production • antitoxin production.
AQA new specification-Plant defence responses-B5.11
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AQA new specification-Plant defence responses-B5.11

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NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson Plant defence responses lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions, answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.3.3.2 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 94-95. Students should be able to describe physical and chemical plant defence responses. Physical defence responses to resist invasion of microorganisms: • Cellulose cell walls. • Tough waxy cuticle on leaves. • Layers of dead cells around stems (bark on trees) which fall off. Chemical plant defence responses: • Antibacterial chemicals. • Poisons to deter herbivores. Mechanical adaptations: • Thorns and hairs deter animals. • Leaves which droop or curl when touched. • Mimicry to trick animals.
AQA new specification-Treating diabetes-B11.3
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AQA new specification-Treating diabetes-B11.3

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Treating diabetes lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, practice exam question with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. May needed to be edited for foundation students. AQA spec link: 5.3.2 Relevant chapter: B11 Hormonal coordination. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 164-165. Specification requires students to know the following; Type 1 diabetes is normally treated with insulin injections. In Type 2 diabetes a carbohydrate controlled diet and an exercise regime are common treatments. Obesity is a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. Students should be able to compare Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and explain how they can be treated. Students should be able to extract information and interpret data from graphs that show the effect of insulin in blood glucose levels in both people with diabetes and people without diabetes.
AQA new specification-Human reproduction-B11.5
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AQA new specification-Human reproduction-B11.5

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Human reproduction lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides. This resource is suitable for combined science students. May needed to be edited for foundation students. AQA spec link: 5.3.4 Relevant chapter: B11 Hormonal coordination. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 168-169. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the roles of hormones in human reproduction, including the menstrual cycle. During puberty reproductive hormones cause secondary sex characteristics to develop. Oestrogen is the main female reproductive hormone produced in the ovary. At puberty eggs begin to mature and one is released approximately every 28 days. This is called ovulation. Testosterone is the main male reproductive hormone produced by the testes and it stimulates sperm production. Several hormones are involved in the menstrual cycle of a woman. • Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) causes maturation of an egg in the ovary. • Luteinising hormone (LH) stimulates the release of the egg. • Oestrogen and progesterone are involved in maintaining the uterus lining.
AQA new specification-Preventing infections-B5.5
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AQA new specification-Preventing infections-B5.5

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This lesson has been created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my combined/additional science class (Year 9-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions and answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is suitable for separate science students. AQA spec link: 4.3.1.1 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 82-83. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Explain how the spread of diseases can be reduced or prevented.
AQA new specification-mitosis and meiosis past paper questions-B2, B12/B13
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AQA new specification-mitosis and meiosis past paper questions-B2, B12/B13

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I have designed a mitosis and meiosis revision exam question pack, total marks /20. Contains a range of short and longer answer questions also requires students to interpret diagrams. This is a great piece of homework or mini class test, that can allow you to determine whether your students can distinguish between these two processes. I've attached the mark scheme separately as it's a great self/peer-assessed activity (reduce the marking load).
AQA new specification-Principles of homeostasis-B10.1
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AQA new specification-Principles of homeostasis-B10.1

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Principles of homeostasis lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.5.1 Relevant chapter: B10 The human nervous system. AQA Biology combined edition textbook-Page 133-134 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to explain that homeostasis is the regulation of the internal conditions of a cell or organism to maintain optimum conditions for function in response to internal and external changes. Homeostasis maintains optimal conditions for enzyme action and all cell functions. In the human body, these include control of: • blood glucose concentration • body temperature • water levels. These automatic control systems may involve nervous responses or chemical responses. All control systems include: • cells called receptors, which detect stimuli (changes in theenvironment) • coordination centres (such as the brain, spinal cord and pancreas) that receive and process information from receptors • effectors, muscles or glands, which bring about responses which restore optimum levels.