Conflict and Tension 1918-39: The Allies and Germany's reaction to the Treaty of Versailles

Conflict and Tension 1918-39: The Allies and Germany's reaction to the Treaty of Versailles

This lesson focuses on the various attitudes and reactions of the Allies after the Treaty of Versailles was agreed and signed. To discover if they were satisfied or not with the results, the students analyse and evaluate a range of sources before coming to conclusions and judgements for each country. Students are given hints on the meaning of the sources and have to interpret their usefulness (which is the exam question 2 on the paper). The lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies and answers for the differentiated questions and tasks set.
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Civil Rights in America: The Jim Crow Laws

Civil Rights in America: The Jim Crow Laws

What were the Jim Crow Laws in America? Who was Jim Crow? Why did this fictional character significantly impact on American society, especially in the south in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? What happened if you did not adhere to these laws? These questions and more are answered in this lesson. Students analyse how black people in America were treated and why discrimination was inherent in some parts of American society and backed up by statute. Students also have to recognise how these laws affected education, family life, social time and employment and prioritise the severest of these laws in their judgement. The lesson comes complete with suggested teaching and learning strategies and a plenary which uses de bono’s 6 thinking hats.
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Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: its effects and its eventual abolition

Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: its effects and its eventual abolition

These seven lessons are designed to cover Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: its effects and its eventual abolition. All the lessons come with suggested teaching and learning strategies and link to the latest interpretations of slavery from the bbc and other sources. The first lesson is an introduction to slavery and asks the question if slavery is still in existence today. Lessons two and three examine the capture and treatment of slaves on the slave ships and the conditions the slaves faced. The fourth lesson analyses the slave auction and how valuable the slaves were. The fifth and sixth lessons look at plantation life and how the slaves tried to resist their owners. The last lesson looks into the abolition movement with a case study of William Wilberforce and his efforts into its abolition throughout the British Empire.
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Britain's transatlantic slave trade: The abolition of slavery

Britain's transatlantic slave trade: The abolition of slavery

Why was the slave trade finally abolished in Britain and her Empire and why did it take so long to achieve? Why were arguments in the eighteenth century challenged so rigorously and overturned in the nineteenth? Which people inspired its abolition and who was against this? These questions and more are answered in this lesson. Students decide which arguments were being put forward to the plantation owners, racists, people who were ignorant and law makers to end the slave trade. They then prioritise the most important arguments in challenging these peoples’ staunch perceptions. The second part of the lesson is a case study of William Wilberforce. Through video, audio and source work, students build up a history of the great man and decide how and why he is significant (this is a differentiated task dependent upon ability.) The lesson comes complete with suggested teaching and learning strategies for teachers and non specialists.
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Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: Slave Plantations

Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: Slave Plantations

In this lesson , students study what plantation life was like for the slaves. What was their typical day like? How hard was the work? Was it made easier by the invention of the cotton gin? How did they relax if at all in the evening and what were their houses or shacks like? Learning tasks include comparing a day in their life with the day of a plantation slave and recognising the hardships endured. They also have to use a number of sources, which are differentiated according to ability, and challenge a statement which suggests a slave’s life wasn’t really that bad. The plenary asks them to use four letters and come up with as many associated words as they can from their learning. The lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies to help and guide teachers.
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GCSE Germany Timeline 1919-45

GCSE Germany Timeline 1919-45

This is a great timeline to use in the classroom or for display in your History department. I have mine permanently displayed in the classroom so I can refer to it as I am teaching the GCSE Germany unit. The students have a visible chronology of the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany. On each slide, I have included some extra information; this is to clarify the subject content for them and each of the 52 slides has an accompanying picture. I have also included a two page timeline for students to keep with events from the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany which can be printed and stuck in their exercise books.
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Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: The Triangular Trade and the capture of slaves

Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: The Triangular Trade and the capture of slaves

This lesson is split into two parts; the first part explains the triangular trade and the various goods and transactions that occurred in the slave trade. Students are required to find this out through documentary and video evidence before plotting it on a table. A mini plenary checks their understanding and uses a ‘what if’ question to challenge their thinking. The second part looks at the story of Olaudah Equiano and how his life was before and after he was captured. However the students are challenged to question his version of events and how there is conflicting evidence in his account. The final part of the lesson analyses how the slaves were captured by whom, prioritising which were the most common forms of capture and using sources of evidence to extract further information. The lesson comes complete with suggested teaching strategies.
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Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: The origins of slavery

Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: The origins of slavery

The lesson aims to introduce the concept of slavery and how it has been active throughout the centuries. Subsequently the students have to categorise the reasons why the trans-Atlantic slave trade was justified by many of our contemporaries and evaluate the most important reasons through differentiated tasks. They also look through a number of sources about slavery from the Ancient Egyptians through to the present day and reveal their findings in a summarisation pyramid. This lesson comes with suggestions of different teaching strategies and is user friendly, especially for non specialists.
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The Second World War: Government propaganda on the Home Front

The Second World War: Government propaganda on the Home Front

This lesson leads students through a wealth of primary sources from pathe news, government films and information leaflets. It analyses how the government in WWII used propaganda to rally and convince the nation to stand firm against Hitler and how they could endure and eventually win the war. How effective and convincing their messages were is up to the students to decipher and judge for themselves. Primary evidence, which not surprisingly give a positive outlook on events such as the evacuation of Dunkirk, Churchill’s radio broadcasts and the bombing of cities, is used; but how effective is their message and will the nation adhere to their warnings about spying and what not to say? Students are questioned throughout the slides and complete some independent research on the types of propaganda posters published such as ‘play your part, salvage and careless talk.’ A differentiated task at the end builds upon the evidence and judgements they have made. The lesson comes complete with embedded videos and a lesson plan on how to use the activities.
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The civil wars throughout Britain: Who was the real King Charles I?

The civil wars throughout Britain: Who was the real King Charles I?

This lesson aims to find out the personality of King Charles. Following in his father’s footsteps, his vanity and obsession with the Divine Right of Kings are major causes of concern for those in Parliament. Students learn about his fragility in his younger life to eventual arrogance as he becomes King and will link a number of reasons together as to why this was to lead to Civil War. Video footage and source work is used to gather the evidence and the students will have to think outside the box to understand his motives and actions at the end using pictures from Rory’s story cubes.
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The Second World War: Hitler's invasion of Russia in 1941

The Second World War: Hitler's invasion of Russia in 1941

Hitler’s invasion of Russia is a fascinating piece of history to study. Why, when one of the greatest ever military commanders Napoleon had failed, did Hitler think he could succeed? Students are posed this question and using a causal spider diagram link the reasons why invading Russia could create many problems and challenges for the Nazis. The confidence of Hitler and his Generals can be seen when analysing sources about the Nazi-Soviet Pact which clearly show Hitler believing he held the upper hand. However no study of the invasion would be complete without looking at the Battle of Stalingrad and using video footage to show the plight of all those involved. There is a choice of two differentiated tasks depending on the ability being taught; in both students decide the most important reasons for the failure and final defeat of the Wehrmacht as they categorise the examples for this. A touch of scrabble at the end asks the students to guess a key word at the end of the lesson.
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The civil wars throughout Britain: Cavaliers and Roundheads

The civil wars throughout Britain: Cavaliers and Roundheads

Who were the two sides in the English Civil War? How did they differ? What did they believe in? Students will be able to answer these questions in this lesson and decide which side of the fence they would be on today. These answers are backed up with some excellent video and audio footage. They will ultimately have to produce a propaganda leaflet encouraging people to join their campaign as a Royalist or Cavalier using persuasive literacy techniques and song lyrics. This is a fun lesson with a number of activities designed to get students involved, active and enjoying their learning.
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The civil wars throughout Britain: Causes of the English Civil War

The civil wars throughout Britain: Causes of the English Civil War

This lesson explores the problems Charles brought upon himself to cause the English Civil War. Students are given information which they have to analyse and decide how and why there were opposing views from Parliament and the King on how to run the country. The use of contemporary accounts and propaganda posters will challenge the more able as well. Students justify who in their opinion is to blame for the Civil War and demonstrate their learning at the end of the lesson using factor and function symbols.
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Recruitment in World War 1

Recruitment in World War 1

This lesson aims to show students how the themes of heroism, patriotism, shame and anti-German feeling led the recruitment drive for young men to volunteer to join the army. Students are led through video footage, an extract from Private Peaceful and Government posters to analyse how these 4 key themes are used. They also learn about Pals Battalions and the shock of what happened to the Accrington Pals in 1916. The lesson concludes by evaluating how effective the recruitment drive and posters were.
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The Second World War: The Home Front

The Second World War: The Home Front

The aim of this lesson is to challenge the assumption that the Government did a great job protecting people during WWII. It also questions the belief that everyone pulled together and did their bit for the war effort. The students will focus on 3 main areas: warning people of air attacks including how to protect yourself in an air raid, the Homeguard and rationing. They plot what the government did or didn’t do on a grid and then after processing the evidence, justify their conclusions using a continuum line as well as completing an extended written task. The resources are differentiated and are also accompanied with video footage from the time.
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The First World War and the Peace Settlement

The First World War and the Peace Settlement

With the National Curriculum in mind, I have created a set of resources for ‘the challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day’ which focus on the First World War and the Peace Settlement. Each lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies and are linked to the latest historical interpretations and debate from the BBC and other sources. The 13 lessons are broken down into the following: L1 The Long Term causes of WWI L2 The Short Term causes of WWI L3 Recruitment in WWI L4 Why build Trenches? L5 Was Life in the Trenches all bad? L6 Is it fair to call Haig ‘the Butcher of the Somme’? L7 Cowardice in WWI L8 War in the Air L9 Weapons of WWI L10 The role of women in WWI L11 Conscientious Objectors L12 The end of WWI L13 The Treaty of Versailles
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The Second World War: Can we regard Winston Churchill as 'The Greatest Briton?'

The Second World War: Can we regard Winston Churchill as 'The Greatest Briton?'

In 2002, the BBC conducted a poll into who is the Greatest Briton. Winston Churchill came out on top. This lesson aims to challenge this assumption and evaluates the 4 areas the BBC cites for his potency; for being the greatest British Gentleman, for inspiring the nation, for symbolising the spirit and strength of Britain and for his comforting speeches. The evidence for this task is through radio broadcasts, video footage and source analysis from which students will conclude and either concur or not with the poll.
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The Second World War: The evacuation of Dunkirk

The Second World War: The evacuation of Dunkirk

This lesson aims to evaluate why the British Government called the tragic events of Dunkirk a success. By the end of the lesson, students will have made up their own minds and be able to give their own interpretations of the events of May 1940. Using video and film footage of the time as well as the present, students will be able to recognise and understand why there is a difference between contemporary and modern versions of Dunkirk. They will also study a range of sources both visual and written and then judge which were most accurate and why, again focusing on contemporary as well as modern day accounts. In conclusion, they will write up their findings in an extended written task.
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The Second World War: Why did Britain adopt a policy of appeasement towards Hitler?

The Second World War: Why did Britain adopt a policy of appeasement towards Hitler?

This lesson questions Britain’s policy of appeasement in the 1930’s but also defends the decision Chamberlain took. Students have to make up their own minds through a variety of learning tasks which include gathering evidence from video footage of the time, completing a card sort activity, creating causational chains and analysing a sources from the time. Some higher order questions at the end are aimed at getting them to think and challenge the perceptions they have made about appeasement.
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The Second World War: Why did World War II start?

The Second World War: Why did World War II start?

This lesson sets out to explains how Hitler set Germany on the road to World War II in 5 steps. Moreover how and why was he able to defy the Treaty of Versailles so easily with little or no consequences (shown through a causal spider’s web). Students analyse video footage and a number of sources using the COP technique (modelled for student understanding) A final chronological recap of the events and evaluation of the most and least important of the events that led to war, will give students an in depth understanding of the start of World War II.
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The Tudors: Did Henry VII really act like a Gangster?

The Tudors: Did Henry VII really act like a Gangster?

This lesson focuses on some crucial and important decision making for Henry VII upon his accession to the throne. He has six decisions to make and students plot these on a grid giving their own views before finding out and evaluating how ruthless Henry was in charge. The lesson hinges and culminates upon whether he was a Gangster or not (judged on the criteria at the beginning of the lesson) in an extended written answer with a checklist for guidance.
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