Edward I and the Conquest of Wales

Edward I and the Conquest of Wales

LESSON OUTLINE • Beat the teacher game to start. Twelve images that represent Wales will be on the board at the start of the lesson. As a test of memory, one image at a time will dissapear, and students will have to identify which image it was. Possibly ask them the link afterwards to ensure they all understand that we will be thinking about Wales. • To providde a background to the war and conquest, students are to watch a clip from Timelines TV Show, from the BBC. They will need to spider diagram all the ways in which the video mentions that the English were controlling the Welsh in the thirteenth century. • Students will be introduced to Edward I and Llywelyn ap Gruffydd (Prince of Wales) and will need to consider how these two friends became enemies and created a war between their two countries. They will do this by reading and sorting cards on their table and completing a levelled worksheet, also considering common KS3 factors such as power, money and land. • Students will complete an exit ticket to check understanding, filling out one reason why Edward declared war on Wales, and one reason why Llywelyn lead his country into war. DIFFERENTIATION • Exemplar work for spider diagram activity to set high expectations and provide guidance. • Three different worksheets for main card sorting and writing activity - one each for HA, MA and LA students, all with different tasks to stretch or support, but the same outcome. • Could perhaps provide glossary for the war cards. Not created by me, but could be useful - particularly to define 'homage'? AFL • Questionning after video to check understanding of key ideas. Also, exemplar work will provide answers these answers to ensure all are recorded on spider diagram. • Teacher circulation during card sorting and writing activity with focus on key students. • Exit tickets to check understanding at the end. CREDIT Credit to wodewee for creating the original information cards. The permission to adapt and share is much appreciated.
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England Under Cromwell

England Under Cromwell

LESSON OUTLINE • Students will enter the classroom. A Breaking News report announcing that the Government have introduced new laws will be on the IWB. Students should take a piece of paper from the Mystery Box, read the card but do not share it with anyone else. It will be one of these 'new rules'. Pick on students to read out what is on their piece of paper - ask them how they feel about this. Reveal that these are actually rules from Puritan England, when Cromwell was in charge. • To know more about how life in England was affected by Oliver Cromwell, students should now read information cards on their table and answer questions on a differentiated worksheet. • Explain how the Interregnum was a difficult time for people: England had never been without a King before, and it ruined belief in the Divine Rite of Kings - people were confused! • As an example of confusion, show students the 'World Turned Upside Down' picture. Students should label this with what they can see, and how it adds to the sense of confusion. • As a plenary, students should imagine that they have just arrived in England on their first visit since before the Civil War! They should write a brief postcard message, summarising what England under Cromwell is like and what they think of it. DIFFERENTIATION • Information cards have key words bolded and underlined for less literate students. • Three versions of questions worksheet - for LA, MA and HA students. • Different expectations when labelling the 'World Turned Upside Down'. Some students can simply label, others must challenge themselves by infering and explaining how the details add to the sense of confusion at the time. • Postcard templates provided. AFL • In starter, questionning to determine how students feel about new rules. • Teacher circulation during worksheet activity. • Whole-class discussion about 'The World Turned Upside Down' and its intended meaning. • Pick on select students to share their postcards.
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The Reformation

The Reformation

LESSON OUTLINE • Show students a map of religion in Europe. Firstly in 1500 when it was entirely Catholic, then again in 1560 when Protestantism was establish. Ask them to think, pair and share what might have happened. • Explain how the catalyst for the religious change was a German monk called Martin Luther. • Students are to find out more about Luther by completing a Facebook profile for him, • Students will now look in detail at Luther's 95 criticisms of the Catholic Church by completing differentiated worksheets. More able students will consider different factors into which these criticisms fell. • Now that students know about Catholicism and Protestantism and the rift that occurred, they are going to draw the insides of the two Churches to consider the differences. • As a final step in the lesson, ask students to show how confident they feel about the Reformation using a confidence tree. DIFFERENTIATION • Two versions of the Facebook profile template. One with prompts to ensure it is easier to complete. The information sheet also has bold and underlined key parts to aid students. • Three versions of the worksheets for students to use when examining the 95 criticisms. Slightly different tasks for HA, MA and LA students respectively. AFL • Get students to share their Facebook profiles with each other. • Teacher questioning after the 95 criticisms worksheet activity. • Students can explain verbally to each other the differences between Catholic and Protestant churches. • Confidence tree acts as student self-assessment of their understanding.
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The East India Company

The East India Company

LESSON OUTLINE • Pointless. Ask students what company is hunting Jack Sparrow. Give them the initials EIC to begin their guesswork. See if they can work out that it is the East India Company. • Explain briefly what the EIC was, but to provide a full background to what the EIC actually was, and so students can understand its role, students are to watch a clip from Timelines TV Show, from the BBC. They will need to spider diagram everything that can be learned from the video. • Students will be introduced to the term "nabob" for the people of the EIC that made a fortune in India. The next task of the students will be to consider the effects that the “nabobs” of the East India Company had in both India and Britain. They will do this by reading and sorting cards on their table and completing a levelled worksheet, also considering common history factors. • Plenary: You're Bard! Explain that Kipling's "White Man's Burden" poem alludes to the EIC in India. Students are to write their own poem, five lines long, summarising what they have learned today. DIFFERENTIATION • Exemplar work for spider diagram activity to set high expectations and provide guidance. • Three different worksheets for main card sorting and writing activity - one each for HA, MA and LA students, all with different tasks to stretch or support, but the same outcome. AFL • Questionning after video to check understanding of key ideas. Also, exemplar work will provide answers these answers to ensure all are recorded on spider diagram. • Teacher circulation during cards and writing activity with focus on key students. • Students could be asked to perform poems as a plenary.
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The Cattle Industry in the American West

The Cattle Industry in the American West

LESSON OUTLINE • Starter. 20 question to guess the mystery item in the lunchbox. How does it relate to what we might learn today? Write on a post-it note. • Students need to learn how the Cattle Industry in the American West started. To achieve the objective, they will 'weed' the correct facts from an information passage to discover the story. • Inform students that there are three great examples of individuals that helped develop the Cattle Industry - John Iliff, Charles Goodnight and Joseph McCoy. Students are going to research one, depending upon their ability. Using reference sheets on their table, students need to find out more information to become an expert on one of these individuals. They will complete part of a worksheet. • Having completed the facts about their group on the worksheets, students will now learn from each other by going around the room and speaking to each other. They will find out about the other two individuals - EG the ones that they have not read about themselves. There is space at the bottom of their own worksheets to record brief notes about what they learn that they consider to be important. • As a plenary, return to starter. Do they now know how it relates? Add to post-it note. DIFFERENTIATION Activity of considering the three key individuals in the cattle industry is already differentiated. Weak students should look at the John Iliff as there is less information and there worksheet contains hints. Middle ability students should look at Charles Goodnight. Higher ability students should look at the Joseph McCoy and have a more demanding worksheet. You will need to sort out your seating plans and distribution of resources before the lesson. AFL • Teacher circulation as students complete their worksheet about the key individuals involved in the cattle industry. Students will then show understanding by teaching each other through discussion. • Cyclical. Return to the starter activity in your plenary to demonstrate progress.
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The Watergate Scandal

The Watergate Scandal

LESSON OUTLINE • Display lots of news headline clippings that contain the suffix "-gate", such as "Sachsgate", "Plebgate" etc. Ask students to firstly identify what the headlines have in common, and then for suggestions on why we attach this suffix to scandals and controversies. • Explain that this practice comes from the Watergate Scandal in 1972. • Students are going to learn about the events of the Watergate Scandal and why it was such a big deal that it destroyed the reputation of Nixon. There will be seven information clues around the room, which students must read and summarise onto their differentiated worksheets to gain the full story. • Students will now look at the effects that followed the Watergate Scandal. Again, they have differentiated worksheets. This time, there will be four information cards on their tables. They must use these cards to complete rows in a data capture worksheet. • As a plenary, display three conundrums on the whiteboard for students to solve. They are all new keywords that the students will hopefully have encountered during the lesson. DIFFERENTIATION • Two versions of the "events" worksheets. The MA worksheet requires summarised information. The LA worksheet has written sentence starters and prompts and only requires a minimal amount of writing. • Three versions of the "effects" worksheet. They all have different levels of challenge or support to cater for all the abilities in the class. AFL • Go through, as a whole class, the correct order of events in the Watergate Scandal, as students will hopefully have correctly recorded on their worksheet. • Teacher circulation during "effects" activity, with questioning of students either throughout or at the end of the activity. • Unscrambling keyword conundrums as a plenary checks understanding.
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The Johnson County War

The Johnson County War

LESSON OUTLINE • Start by showing an image of two people being hung. It is from a dramatisation rather than a primary source, but the students do not need to know. The main part of the image will be obscured. Ask the students to complete what they think it should show before the full reveal. Then, ask what questions they have about it...? • Students first need to know why Homesteaders and Cattle Ranchers disliked each other as an introduction to the Range Wars. Pair them up and give an information sheet to each pair. • One student will record information about why Homesteaders hated Cattle Ranchers and the other will record information about why Cattle Ranchers hated Homesteaders. Then the pairs can teach each other. • Now students have the necessary background, they can look at the most famous Range War... The Johnson County War. • Students are to glue some pictures showing the progress of the Johnson County War into their exercise books in the correct chronological order to create a picture comic strip. • There will be three information sheets, differentiated for all the abilities in the class. Students must use these to write information next to each picture in their chronological picture comic strip. • An example of good practise is included on the PowerPoint slide. • Students are to report back on their learning. Using a template, they must write a headline and a topic sentence for an article about the Johnson County War. This can be an exit ticket. DIFFERENTIATION • Glossary for weaker students when using the information sheet about the reasons for dislike between Homesteaders and Cattle Ranchers. • Three versions of the information for the comic strip activity. Easy wording for lower-ability students, normal wording for the middle, and more wordy complicated information for the higher-ability students. AFL • Students to teach themselves in paired activity about the reasons for Homesteader and Cattle Rancher rivalries. • Go through the correct order of the comic strip as a class, and some appropriate information to write alongside each image. • Newspaper headline templates could be an exit ticket.
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The Great Depression

The Great Depression

LESSON OUTLINE • Iconic photographs displayed on the whiteboard. Ask students what they know, or can guess, about each one. The one that might confuse them is 'migrant mother' hence this will be our hook into the lesson. • Explain that the USA was having a boom in the 1920s and then this all changed, virtually overnight, into the Great Depression. • Students are to look at some causes of the depression and diamond rank them, ensuring that the most important cause (in their opinion) is explained. • Students will now look at the consequences. They will need to read an information sheet and then answer some comprehension questions with different levels of complexity. • As a plenary, students will summarise their learning by writing an Instagram caption to go with the 'migrant mother' picture, as seen at the start of the lesson. This can be used as an exit ticket. DIFFERENTIATION • Information sheets have key words in bold and underlined for easier comprehension. • Two different sets of questions - one for lower students, and one for higher students. Each question sheet has different tiers of answers - students can challenge themselves, or stick to their comfort zone. AFL • Questioning throughout, particularly the students' reasons for their diamond ranking of causes. • Exit tickets as a plenary to check understanding.
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Fulford and Stamford Bridge

Fulford and Stamford Bridge

LESSON OUTLINE • Two pictures on the whiteboard to greet students. What do these two things have in common? Answer is that they are both called Stamford Bridge. This will lead into the learning. • Students will put themselves in the position of Harold Godwinson in 1066. Facing two invasions, what would they do? Students to come up with their own plan, before hearing his actual actions. • Students will have a comprehension task with leveled questions about Fulford and Stamford Bridge, taking their answer from an information sheet. Extension question available for challenge. • Hot seat plenary activity. Ask one confident student to take the seat. The other students are to ask a series of questions. DIFFERENTIATION • Information sheets have key words in bold and underlined for easier comprehension. • Two different sets of questions - one for lower students, and one for higher students. Each question sheet has different tiers of answers - students can challenge themselves, or stick to their comfort zone. AFL • Questioning throughout to check understanding. • Hot seat plenary to check that the pupils have a strong understanding.
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Pearl Harbour

Pearl Harbour

LESSON OUTLINE • Game of 20 Questions for students to guess a famous movie. Teacher can only answer with Yes/No. Stickers awarded for correct answers! • Movie is, of course, Pearl Harbour. Watch trailer as a class as a way to launch into thinking about the attack. • Show where Pearl Harbour is located using a map and explain it is the base of the US Pacific Fleet. • Students are going to complete a mini fact file about the attack as background, using an information sheet to detail two causes, the events of the day, and the consequences. • Students are now going to consider the factors that prompted the Japanese to attack, namely power, money and revenge. Students will have a pack of cards on their table. They must write information into three columns in their exercise book depending on which factor the information evidences. As an extension, students may consider links between the columns. • Students will write a short paragraph explaining which factor they felt was most important for prompting the Japanese to attack. These can be leveled. • Brief whole class discussion about the USS Arizona memorial. Is it a fitting way to remember all the dead? DIFFERENTIATION • Information sheet for factfile has key parts bolded and underlined. • Two versions of factfile template, one as a cloze exercise for less able students. • Three versions of information cards for factors activity. Less cards for less able. More complicated working for more able. AFL • Go through answers for factfile as a class to check understanding. • Factors paragraph could be leveled or assessed with www/ebi. • Class discussion at the end of the lesson to check overall understanding.
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The Reichstag Fire

The Reichstag Fire

LESSON OUTLINE • Students will work out the title by decoding it as the starter. It is a simple number substitution with 'A' being '1' etc. • Students are being enrolled into the 'Federal Bureau of Historical Investigations' today. Give them one minute to make a special agent badge with card and felt tips. This is not necessary for the learning, but is fun. • Having given the students background to the fire and shown them pictures, they need to discover what actually happened and what the results were. To do this, show them the relevant clip from rise of evil and get them to record answers to simple questions on the investigations sheet provided. • Now bring in the idea that we are going to work out exactly what happened and which of four suspects (Van der Lubbe, Torgler, Goering, Von Helldorff) was responsible. • Students need to be in groups of four. Each student is defending one of the men, but also must look for evidence that the others are guilty. • Have evidence around the room on walls. Students need to complete a worksheet, considering the content and reliability of the evidence. Ensure students are not copying evidence word for word. • Once students have completed their sheet (or got as much done as possible in the time) they must get back in to groups. Then they should have a shouting match where they defend/ argue against each of their suspects. Encourage noise and shouting. • Students will show their final ideas by placing post-its on the whiteboard underneath the person that they feel was responsible. Then the teacher should pick on students for questioning. DIFFERENTIATION • Cypher key available to help with the code-breaking starter. • Students need to be in groups of 4 with students of a similar ability for the main suspects activity to work effectively. Each student is defending one of the men, but also must look for evidence that the others are guilty. They will be learning from each other. AFL • Students will show their working by deciphering the title and writing it down before the Title/L.O.s slide is revealed. • Go through the correct answers to the video as a class to ensure understanding. • Students will be showing understanding by debating/arguing with each other about the guilt of the four suspects. • Post-it notes on the whiteboard at the end will reveal the suspect each student thought was most likely to be responsible.
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The Nazi Police State

The Nazi Police State

LESSON OUTLINE • Pictures on the whiteboard representing ways that the Nazis used terror/fear to control Germany. Ask the students to guess what the pictures represent. • Tell the students that two members of the class are secretly spying on behavior and reporting to the headteacher. Ask them how they feel about this... • Give the definition of a police state. Ensure the students copy this down. Explain that the SS was the main overseer of the Nazi police state. • Students are going to see a diagram showing the structure of the SS for two minutes. They must try to remember it, but cannot write any notes, After two minutes, get them to complete a template from memory. There is an extension task for quick students. • Now students are going to consider the role of the SS, amongst other factors, in making Germany a police state, They will have a worksheet to complete about all the aspects of the police state. Each student will have an information card. They will speak to each other to get information to complete their worksheet. Linking extension available for quick students. • Ask students to write/arrange their factors into an order of relative importance. • As a plenary, students are going to complete a thermometer of understanding to show how confident they feel about the Nazi police state, and why. DIFFERENTIATION • Three versions of the worksheet for the students to complete. LA worksheet has a bit more scaffolding, whilst HA worksheet has a linking task included. • Students learning from each other, regardless of ability, in the 'factors' task. • Extension tasks. AFL • Go through the correct structure of the SS as a class after students have completed their template to aid misconceptions. • Students will be showing understanding by writing an order of relative importance. • Thermometer of understanding as a plenary for students to show how confident they feel and why.
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Introduction to the British Empire

Introduction to the British Empire

LESSON OUTLINE • Students will attempt to guess the link between three people: Queen Victoria, Palpatine and Augustus. The answer is that they all lead an Empire. • Introduce the concept of the British Empire. Tell students that to learn more about it, they are going to watch a Horrible Histories clip. Students must answers some questions on a sheet as they watch. Can be watched twice. • Now you need to consider why Britain wanted/needed an Empire. To do this, students are going to use information sheets to find out about four British colonies: Ghana, Australia, Jamaica and India. They will be completing differentiated worksheets. • Students will now complete a handy-five review to demonstrate what they have learned over the duration of the lesson, and any questions they need answering to further their understanding. DIFFERENTIATION • Two versions of the worksheet for the Horrible Histories clip. One will have less (and simpler) questions to answer. • Three versions of the colonies worksheet will be provided for LA, MA and HA students. • Keywords are bolded and underlined on the information sheets. AFL • Review the Horrible Histories answers as a class. • Students to hold up their handy-five review at the end of the lesson to check overall understanding.
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Interpretations of Oliver Cromwell

Interpretations of Oliver Cromwell

LESSON OUTLINE • Students will be asked to explain what they can see in three optical illusions. • Explain that events and people in History can be seen in different ways too, just like optical illusions. One such man is Oliver Cromwell... • Students are going to further their understanding of Oliver Cromwell by completing a Facebook profile about him, using an information sheet. • Students will now consider if Cromwell was a hero or a villain. They will do this by looking at sources and then fitting them into two columns in their books. Proper explanation must also be provided. • Students will now write a written response, explaining which of the two interpretations of Cromwell they most agree with and why. • Students will demonstrate their progress by returning to their acrostic poem and adding more information. DIFFERENTIATION • Two versions of the Facebook profile, one with prompts to aid students to complete it. • The information sheet for the Facebook profile has keywords underlined and bolded to aid comprehension. • Three versions of the sources are provided to stretch and support students of differing ability levels. AFL • Ask students to share their Facebook profiles with each other to check understanding. • Teacher circulation to ensure students are examining the interpretations of Cromwell accurately. Questioning about why students have placed a particular sources where they have can also be applied. • Explained response at the end of the lesson can be leveled.
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The Munich Putsch

The Munich Putsch

LESSON OUTLINE • Students will start be playing Pictionary. There will be a pack of keywords for the lesson, or from recent topics, and they need to draw these for their partners. See how many can be guessed in the one minute timer. • Define one of these words (Putsch) and then get students to complete a worksheet about what happened in the Munich Putsch. Four members of the class have information to tell the story, they will stand up, and read their part of the story. The other students will need to fill out the relevant part of their sheet. • Students will now look at the events that happened in more detail. They need to consider whether the Putsch was ultimately a success or a failure. To do this they have an information sheet full of ideas and must make notes in a table in their exercise books. • Ask students to write on a post-it note whether they think the Putsch was more of a failure or a success. • Students will now pair up with somebody that thinks differently to them and have a discussion to verbally strengthen their views. DIFFERENTIATION • Three versions of the information sheets for the success/failure activity. More information for the high ability students, less information for the lower ability students and with key information highlighted. Normal sheet for middle attainers. AFL • Go through the correct order of the events of the Munich Putsch after the first activity to ensure that students have written them in the correct place. • Students will pair up and discuss at the end of the lesson.This will show you have strong their ideas are, and acts as a good prelude to a potential writing task.
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The Exoduster Movement

The Exoduster Movement

LESSON OUTLINE • In the style of Hangman, students are going to guess the keyword that goes in the gap. The answer is 'Exodusters' although they will not know what that means just yet... • Anyway, introduce the students to the idea of the Civil War and how it was all about slavery. • So that the students can learn more about how life in the 1800s sucked for African-Americans, they are going to play a boardgame, Information that they learn must then be recorded on a timeline in their exercise books so they are assessing continuities and changes. • Students now know that life was pretty bad for African-Americans, especially with the Jim Crow laws coming into effect. So now they need to consider why they moved particularly to Kansas. To do this, there will be sources which they will need to use to fill out worksheets. • Students will now consider which factor from their worksheet was most important in leading the African-American Exodusters to migrate to Kansas. DIFFERENTIATION • Boardgame has lots of information cards. However, the really important ones are presented in red so that weaker students can record them onto their timelines quickly and easilly. • Three versions of the worksheet for the main activity. One for LA students, one for MA students, and a third for the HA students. All aimed to stretch or support. AFL • Teacher circulation and questioning during boardgame activity. • Explained paragraph that students write about their factors at the end of the lesson can be leveled or reviewed with WWW/EBI feedback.
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Economic Recovery Under Stresemann

Economic Recovery Under Stresemann

LESSON OUTLINE • Students have to completed a quartered placemat about what characteristics make an good hero. • Link this starter activity to the learning: the economy of Germany in 1923 was in a terrible state and things were looking desperate… Then a hero emerged in the darkness - Gustav Stresemann! • There will now be a mock Question Time Interview using the attached script to know contextual information about Gustav Stresemann. You will need will need five confident volunteers - Stresemann, Interviewer and 3 people to ask questions in the audience. Students will need to make plenty of notes in their book using the information that they will hear during the interview! • Students will now learn specifically about the plan Stresemann put in place to create a period of prosperity in Germany know as the ‘Golden Age of Weimar’. They will use the cards on their table to find out more about the actions of Stresemann and how they impacted on Germany. • Memory is very important in the new History specification, so students will conclude their learning by making a mnemonic of the economic achievements made by Stresemann. DIFFERENTIATION • Interview activity with a script caters for students with an auditory learning style. • Three versions of the worksheet to complete about the achievements of Stresemann - HA, MA and LA. More prompts and less information to be recorded on lower ability sheets. AFL • Students to present notes from interview to the teacher. Some form of peer sharing can also take place if notes are not very full for some students. • Teacher circulation during worksheet activity. Check understanding with questioning of key students... how did each action help German recovery? • Pick on students to perform their mnemonics at the end of the lesson.
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The Evacuation of Dunkirk

The Evacuation of Dunkirk

LESSON OUTLINE • Coloured squares over a mystery image will be removed to slowly reveal a picture of the Dunkirk evacuation. Students are to try and guess what a mystery image shows. • Brief teacher background detailing that the image is of the Dunkirk evacuations, and what exactly this was... • Having seen that the British Army was thoroughly defeated by May 1940, students are to consider WHY. They will do this by learning about Blitzkrieg. Four students in the class will stand up to read stages of a Blitzkrieg attack, which students will have to carefully listen to, and then roughly record onto a worksheet. • We will now start considering interpretations: was Dunkirk a triumph or a disaster for Britain? Students will read five sources and record their ideas and evidence into a table. • To summarise their learning, students will write their own opinion on Dunkirk as a triumph or a disaster, using a writing frame and level criteria. DIFFERENTIATION • Three versions of sources worksheet, depending on ability level. All have the same rough outcome. • Sentence starters for levelled writing at end of the lesson. AFL • Students learning from each other about the four stages of a Blitzkrieg attack. • Teacher circulation and close questionning of students during the sources activity to ensure understanding. • Levelled writing can be leveled/graded using the marking criteria.
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England Under Cromwell

England Under Cromwell

LESSON OUTLINE • Students will enter the classroom. A Breaking News report announcing that the Government have introduced new laws will be on the IWB. Students should take a piece of paper from the Mystery Box, read the card but do not share it with anyone else. It will be one of these 'new rules'. Pick on students to read out what is on their piece of paper - ask them how they feel about this. Reveal that these are actually rules from Puritan England, when Cromwell was in charge. • To know more about how life in England was affected by Oliver Cromwell, students should now read information cards on their table and answer questions on a differentiated worksheet. • Explain how the Interregnum was a difficult time for people: England had never been without a King before, and it ruined belief in the Divine Rite of Kings - people were confused! • As an example of confusion, show students the 'World Turned Upside Down' picture. Students should label this with what they can see, and how it adds to the sense of confusion. • As a plenary, students should imagine that they have just arrived in England on their first visit since before the Civil War! They should write a brief postcard message, summarising what England under Cromwell is like and what they think of it. DIFFERENTIATION • Information cards have key words bolded and underlined for less literate students. • Three versions of questions worksheet - for LA, MA and HA students. • Different expectations when labelling the 'World Turned Upside Down'. Some students can simply label, others must challenge themselves by infering and explaining how the details add to the sense of confusion at the time. • Postcard templates provided. AFL • In starter, questionning to determine how students feel about new rules. • Teacher circulation during worksheet activity. • Whole-class discussion about 'The World Turned Upside Down' and its intended meaning. • Pick on select students to share their postcards.
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Surgery and Anatomy in the Middle Ages

Surgery and Anatomy in the Middle Ages

LESSON OUTLINE • Slow reveal of an image of Medieval Surgery. Students will guess the hidden part of the image. • This image will then provide some discussion prompts for the students. • Students will have ten minutes to complete worksheets by taking part in an information trail about knowledge of surgery. Following teacher input, they will then consider the factors that were involved in the development of Surgery and Anatomy. • Introduce character of Henry V. Students will be learning about his surgery. They will have to watch a video and then answer some questions in full sentences. DIFFERENTIATION • Two different version of the worksheet will be in use depending on target level. • Different versions of the questions, depending on target levels. AFL • Questioning to determine what the image shows. I will be expecting answers about what is happening, and what potential problems might be involved. • Plenary will consist of students taking part in a stand up / sit down game to see how much progress they think has been made in the Middle Ages from the Ancient World.
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