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The History Academy

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Card Sort: What is the difference between democracy and dictatorship?
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Card Sort: What is the difference between democracy and dictatorship?

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This great resource makes an excellent starter, plenary or mini plenary for a variety of lessons on this topic. I usually use this activity whilst teaching about Stalin or Hitler, but it can also be used in government, politics, ethics and citizenship lessons. This resource includes two heading cards labelled 'Democracy' and 'Dictatorship' as well as eighteen statement cards which can be matched to either heading. The resource is provided in word so you can easily adapt this resource for your students by adding or taking away statements. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The rise of the dictators Know: What is the difference between democracy and dictatorship? Understand: How is the way in which law and order is maintained different in both systems? Evaluate: How democratic were the systems of government set up by Stalin and Hitler? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What are the key features of a dictatorship and democracy? Explain: What the differences between a democracy and dictatorship? Analyse: How similar and different were the systems of government set up by Stalin and Hitler? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
OCR GCSE: America Land of the Free - Black Civil Rights 1960 - 1975
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OCR GCSE: America Land of the Free - Black Civil Rights 1960 - 1975

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This tried and tested resource includes a wide range of revision notes, tasks, activities and assessment for learning that are suitable for the full ability spectrum at GCSE History. It is aimed at helping students studying Black Civil Rights as part of the OCR GCSE Modern World History: USA Land of the Free 1945 - 1975. This booklet is part two of a two part series, which I have had to break up due to size of the resource. This booklet comes in two sections. The first resource is a study guide which includes revision notes and sources on the history of the Black Civil Rights movement from 1960 - 1975. ' Accompanying each section are a range of interactive activities and tasks from pro and con organisers, Venn diagrams, thinking skills triangles to various mind map activities to help reinforce and check students knowledge and understanding. The second section, is made up of a series of past paper questions from OCR's GCSE on this topic. Accompanying these questions are student guides on how to answer each type of question as well as a student mark scheme for self / peer assessment. If you do a different exam board, you can easily drop in your own mark schemes into the table format and adapt this resource. The full contents for each section are listen below: 1. Background: How had civil rights improved by 1961? 2. Martin Luther’s ideas, methods and tactics 3. Malcom X’s ideas, methods and tactics 4. Venn diagram activity: Martin Luther King V Malcolm X 5. Voting Rights and empowering black people 6. Birmingham Protest 7. Washington March 8. Civil Rights Act & Freedom Summer 1964 9. Selma & voting rights 10. A new direction: violent direct action 11. Sources on black nationalism 12. Mind Map on black nationalism 13. President Kennedy V President Johnson 14. OCR Past Paper Questions 15. Pupil Mark Schemes I have also included my SmartNotes with aims, objectives, outcomes, annotations, graphic organiser templates and relevant sources as a bonus to help anyone teaching or studying this topic, as a bonus. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop or stay in touch via: https://www.facebook.com/TheHistoryAcademy/ Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Does Prison Work?
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Card Sort: Does Prison Work?

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This thought provocative resource aims to help students assess whether prison sentences work. This is a controversial subject with people from all sides advocating different solutions from longer sentences to rehabilitate prisoners to alternatives sentences based in the community. This card sort can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students excited, engaged, whilst improving their understanding of this difficult topic. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two headings cards labelled ‘Pros / Advantages’ and ‘Cons / Disadvantages’ as well as sixteen information cards to be sorted. At the end of the document there is an extension question designed to help consolidate the lesson. This is a fully editable document which can be customised if necessary to suit your students. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Crime and Punishment Know: How are people supported in prison? Understand: What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Evaluate: Does prison protect society from crime? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - How are people treated in prison? Explain - What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Analyse - Does prison protect society from crime? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: The Glorious Revolution in 1688
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Card Sort: The Glorious Revolution in 1688

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This outstanding resource is designed to get students decide what the causes and consequences of the Glorious Revolution. It is suitable for the full ability range and is a fun and interactive resource with which to engage your students. It can be uses as a starter, plenary or homework activity and should work alongside any main stream resource on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word Document, which contains instructions, a learning objectives, two activities, two heading cards labeled cause and consequence and eight information cards to be cut out and sorted underneath them. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Making of the UK Know: What were the causes and consequences of the Glorious Revolution? Understand: Why did James II become increasingly unpopular? Evaluate: How significant was the Glorious Revolution in 1688? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What were the causes and consequences of the Glorious Revolution? Explain: Why did James I become increasingly unpopular and what impact did the revolution have on Catholics living in Britain? Analyse: Begin to make a judgement on the significance of the Glorious Revolution? This resource should appeal to a range of abilities and learning styles. It shouldn’t take more than 10 to 12 minutes for a middle ability class to cut out the cards and sort them. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did some women get the vote in 1918?
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Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase the card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? However, to sweeten the deal, I have also included my diamond 9 activity, which can be given to your gifted and talented or more able for as a separate task to extend their critical thinking skills. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document as well as a PowerPoint. The Word document include aims, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment question, pupil mark scheme and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to why some women got the vote in 1918, with an appropriate link to a video clip on YouTube. It is assumed that you have already studied the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist as prior knowledge. The next slide facilitates the card sort, whilst the fourth slide facilitates a pair / group discussion on which factor was the most important. Once this is complete, students can do a follow up assessment on the topic either for homework or next lesson. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
How did the Homesteaders overcome the problems they faced on the Great Plains?
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How did the Homesteaders overcome the problems they faced on the Great Plains?

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This great lesson is designed to help students understand how the Homesteaders overcame the problems they faced on the Great Plains such as water supply, natural hazards, extreme weather, protecting crops, bankruptcy, insects and Native Americans. This lesson includes a 26 slide PowerPoint with six core activities including starter, review summary tasks on the problems, thinking skills review activities, card sort and an exam question. I have also included fourteen illustrated information slides to be used either before or after the card sort activity explaining both the problems facing the Homesteaders and the solutions that they came up with. In addition, the PowerPoint contains aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides, pictures, diagrams and templates for summarizing learning. The two page word document contains 14 problems with the solutions that the Homesteaders came up with mixed up. Students cut out the cards and match the problems and solutions under the two headings. Once they have peer reviewed or checked them during a class feedback session, students can then stick them into their books. Alternatively, you could create a class set that are kept in envelops and quickly matched and then put back as a quick starter or plenary. For more information please see the sample preview. The aims and objectives for this activity are: Theme: How successful were the Homesteaders at settling on the Great Plains? Know: What problems did they have to overcome? Understand: How did the Homesteaders survive and build successful farms on the Great Plains? Evaluate: What impact did these solutions have on the Homesteaders, the environment and the Native Americans? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change, Continuity and Source Evaluation. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What problems did the Homesteaders have to overcome in order to survive? Explain: Did they try and solve these problems? Analyze: begin to make an overall judgment on how successful the Homesteaders were at settling on the Great Plains and at what cost? This is a great lesson which, which your students will enjoy. Please check out some of my other resources on the American West or follow the History Academy on You Tube, Facebook or Twitter. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?
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Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversies surrounding the campaign to get women the vote in Britain. The women’s movement was split between the peaceful suffragists on the one hand, who made up nearly 80% of women, whilst on the other there were the better known militant suffragettes. The lesson resources have been designed to suit the full spectrum of ability at KS3 and should work alongside any mainstream textbook or resource on this topic. However, I have also included a PowerPoint to accompany the lesson which includes all the necessary background knowledge for the lesson. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document an an accompanying PowerPoint presentation. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Suffragette’ and ‘Suffragist’, along with 20 information cards that can be sorted under one of the two headings. Whilst the PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides, links to appropriate video clips and additional tasks, including an alternative Venn diagram activity comparing the two groups of campaigners. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How were the suffragist and suffragette campaigns different? Understand: Why were their methods and tactics different? Evaluate: Which group was the most effective? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The differences and similarities between a suffragist and a suffragette? Explain: Why were their methods and tactics different? Analyse: Which organisation was more effective at changing peoples attitudes towards women? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. If you are interested you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Opposition in Nazi Germany - The White Rose
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Opposition in Nazi Germany - The White Rose

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying how effective the opposition movement was in Nazi Germany by focusing on the White Rose group set up by Hans and Sophie Scholl. The text level of the worksheet would suit middle and upper ability students. The follow up tasks include a mind mapping exercise, questions and a source analysis question. The linked BBC video clip is an excellent resource to use along side this resource. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet. This beautifully illustrated resource includes information explaining the why the group was set up, its aims, methods and why it ultimately failed. This topic can be used as a case study on both the power of the Nazi state and why the opposition failed. The activity section includes three sections. The first is a mind mapping exercise questions, which is set along side a second alternative section which includes question and answers. The final section involves looking at an extract from a White Rose pamphlet and asking the question, why was the opposition so weak? The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: How did the Nazis keep control of Germany? Know: What were the aims and methods of the White Rose opposition group? Understand: Why did the White Rose opposition group fail? Evaluate: What can we learn from the failure of this group about why the opposition failed? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What were the aims and methods of the White Rose opposition group? Explain: Why did the White Rose opposition group fail? Analyse: What can we learn from the failure of this group about why the opposition failed? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Why did Charles I decide to rule without Parliament in 1629?
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Why did Charles I decide to rule without Parliament in 1629?

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This outstanding lesson, which has been fine tune in the classroom by experienced teachers, is designed to help students understand the problems facing Charles I in 1625 and why he decided to rule without Parliament. Once students have worked their way through the introduction, they are presented with a number of problems facing Charles I ranging from religious, financial, foreign relations, the growth of Parliament and his beliefs in the Divine Rights of Kings. Once they have reviewed, categorize and prioritized these problems, students are then asked to produce a speech suggesting how Charles I could solve his problems and then peer assess each others speeches. This could be turned into a competition. In the final plenary activity, students are presented with Charles I’s decision to rule without Parliament and asked to assess whether it would help to solve his problems in the long term? This lesson is suitable for the full range of ability. I have built a number of different tasks and activities around these different exercises so that you can chose a suitable flight path through the topic. So, for example, students can use to produce their summary diagram of Charles I’s problems or color code the exercise book sized version that I have included at the end of the PP. I have also differentiated the problem slides so that you have a foundation and core version. Please see the detailed preview for further information, but I have included everything that you would need to produce a fun and engaging lesson with a strong literacy focus. When you purchase this lesson, you will be able to download a nineteen slide PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, tasks, activities and templates to help students The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Causes of the English Civil War Know: Why did Charles I decide to rule without Parliament in 1629? Understand: What problems faced Charles I when he became King in 1625? Evaluate: Which problems posed the greatest threat to Charles I? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Charles I decide to rule without Parliament? Explain: What problems did Charles I face in 1625? Analyze: Which problem posed the greatest threat to Charles I? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
What was the difference between a Suffragette and a Suffragists?
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What was the difference between a Suffragette and a Suffragists?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversies surrounding the campaign to get women the vote in Britain. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability and should work alongside any mainstream textbook or resource on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document as well as an accompanying PowerPoint. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled 'Suffragette' and 'Suffragist', along with 20 information cards that can be sorted under one of the two headings. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides , sources and appropriate video clip links. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief introduction to the historical controversy. The next 6 slides describe the aims, objectives and methods used by both groups. This is then followed up by completing the card sort activity. Once this is complete, students can then feedback and then do a follow up source assessment on the topic. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. At various points, I have included links to useful video clips. These can be accessed when the PP is in show mode by clicking on the play button. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How were the suffragist and suffragette campaigns different? Understand: Why were their methods and tactics different? Evaluate: Which group was the most effective? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The differences and similarities between a suffragist and a suffragette? Explain: Why were their methods and tactics different? Analyse: Which organisation was more effective at changing peoples attitudes towards women? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
How significant was Catholic Emancipation in 1829?
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How significant was Catholic Emancipation in 1829?

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This lesson has been designed primarily for A Level students studying the significance of Catholic emancipation in the United Kingdom. It focuses on divisions within the Tory Party, the protest methods used by Daniel O’Connell and the Catholic Association and how they in turn influenced the Parliamentary reform movement in Britain. When teaching this module to your students, it is important to stress the role played by Daniel O’Connell in developing the peaceful, indirect methods and tactics that played a crucial role in other later civil rights movements. When you purchase this resources you will be able to download two PowerPoints. The first PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, activities, starters, plenaries, information slides, diagrams, primary and secondary sources to help students evaluate the significance of Catholic emancipation. The seconds contains photocopiable graphic organisers and resources to help students to complete the tasks and activities. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives for these resources are as follows: Theme: Protest and Reform 1820 - 1834 Know: What problems faced Catholics living in the UK? Understand: What methods did the Catholic Association use to campaign for emancipation? Evaluate: How significant was Catholic emancipation? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Significance WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems faced by Catholics living in the UK? Explain: What methods did the Catholica Association use to campaign or emancipation? Analyse: How significant was Catholic If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources in the History Academy TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Building the Railways 1750 - 1900
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Building the Railways 1750 - 1900

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These tried and tested resource looks at one of the most amazing feats of the modern age, the building of the railways in Victorian Britain. The accomplishment of the navvies, often overlooked in history, rivals that of the pyramid builders and those who built the Great Wall of China. This resource is part of a series that have been written on the Transport Revolution. It follows on from the birth of the railways, but can be sued a stand alone resource. The PowerPoint is design to support the worksheet, but can be used independently. The activities are designed to appeal to a wide range of learners. There are five activities in the PowerPoint including, a snowballing starter of the key words, a class debate, heads and tails, labelling exercise and a word search. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: What problems faced engineers whilst building the railways? Understand: How did engineers overcome the shape of the land? Evaluate: Why did the railways rapidly grow from 1850 – 1900? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Significance and Source Analysis WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: how railway engineers built the railways? Explain: How railway engineers overcame the shape of the land? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on why the railways expanded rapidly between 1850 – 1900? The PowerPoint also includes some links to some amazing videos on You Tube. Please remember that the PP must be in show mode in order for the hyperlink to work. Anyway, have fun with this lesson. My students always love it. Its fully customisable as everything in provided in Microsoft documents. You may want to include some local examples of viaducts, cuttings, embankments if you want to contextualise the learning to your local environment. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Fox Hunting Debate
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Card Sort: Fox Hunting Debate

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Fox hunting has become for many an emotive issue with the views of the countryside and cities diverging other whether the sport is a cruel or natural past time. This resource aims to help students understand some of the key issues and help then come to a balanced conclusion on the morality of fox hunting. It be used alongside any main stream text book or video clip as a starter, mini plenary or a consolidation exercise. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen statements that can sorted to help summarise the arguments for and against the ban being lifted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Rights and Responsibilities Know: What is Fox hunting and why was it banned? Understand: What are the arguments for and against lifting the ban on Fox hunting? Evaluate: Should the hunting of all animals be banned or is fox hunting a special case? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is Fox hunting and why was it banned? Explain - the arguments for and against lifting the ban on fox hunting? Analyse - If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Lord Liverpool: Protesters 1815 - 1821
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Lord Liverpool: Protesters 1815 - 1821

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This lesson has been designed primarily for A Level students studying Lord Liverpool’s ministry, but can also be used at GCSE. This resource focuses on the first half of Lord Liverpool’s ministry, when the government faced huge economic problems caused by the Industrial Revolution, the Corn Laws and the fall out from end of the war with France. When teaching this topic, it is crucial to focus on the price of bread as this later links with Peel’s repeal of the Corn Laws at the height of Chartism when the rest of Europe fell into revolution in 1848. It is also important to focus on how these protesters were controlled or (policed) as this links into other reforms. This lesson looks at Luddism, the Spa field Riots, the March of the Blanketeers, the Pentrich Rising, The Peterloo Massacre, the Cato Street Conspiracy and the Queen Caroline Affair. At the end of each section, there is a separate slide on both the local and national government response to the protesters. It is important to some syllabuses to differentiate between the two. At the bottom of each relevant slide is a continuum for students to evaluate both the threat level posed by the protesters and the government response. At the end of the PowerPoint, I have also included a table for students to use to help summarise what they have learnt, this is particularly useful at GCSE. When you purchase this resources you will be able to download a PowerPoint with 36 slides on Protesters against Lord Liverpool’s government from 1815 - 1821. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, activities, information slides, diagrams, primary and secondary sources to help students evaluate the threat level posed by the protesters and the response of both local and nation government. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives for these resources are as follows: Theme: Protest and Reform 1815 - 1834 Know: Who Protested and why from 1815 - 1821? Understand: How did the government respond to these protesters on a local and national level? Evaluate: How much of a threat did each group of protesters pose? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Significance WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Who protested and why from 1815 - 1821? Explain: How did the government respond on a local and national level? Analyse: How much of a threat did each group of protesters pose? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources in the History Academy TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
US Isolationism PowerPoint
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US Isolationism PowerPoint

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The aim of this resource is explain why the USA introduced a policy of isolationism from 1919 to 1939. The learning objectives are as follows: Know: What was the US Policy of isolationism from 1919 – 1941 Understand: Why did the USA follow a policy of isolationism? Analyse: What impact did this policy have on both domestic and international relations? What Am I Looking For? Identify and Describe: the US policy of isolationism and its effects Explain: why the USA introduced isolationism and its effects Analyse: What were the consequences of the US policy of isolationism and come to a judgement on which was the most significant? The starter is a snowballing activity, instructions included. The first part of the presentation then looks at the impact of the First World War and the Treaty of Versailles in the US decision not to sign it or it or join the League of Nations. This is then backed up with a consolidation exercise of a past paper question with a pupil mark scheme which can be easily adapted for peer and self assessment. The next part of the presentation then looks at 6 key consequences of the US policy of isolationism by looking in outline at economic isolationism, immigration controls, Prohibition, the 'Red Scare', Great Depression and the causes of the Second World War. The plenary activity focuses on a thinking skills review triangle, which aims to get students to decide which consequence is the most significant. I have also included a homework activity and some notes with the slides. This resources really well along side my worksheet on US isolation which you can download and buy separately or as bundle with this presentation. Both can be used independently. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Cards Sort: Causes of the English Civil War Chronology Exercise
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Cards Sort: Causes of the English Civil War Chronology Exercise

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The great little resources is designed for core and foundation students. It includes 12 key events which were important steps or turning points that led to the English Civil War. Task 1: Sort the cards into the correct chronological order Task 2: Colour code those events which were the fault of either Charles I or Parliament Task 3: Write an extended answer explaining who as to blame for starting the war. Aims & Objectives Theme: Causes of the English Civil War 1642 - 1660 Know: What were the key steps to war? Understand: Which causes were the fault of Charles I or Parliament? Evaluate: Who was to blame for starting the English Civil War? WILF - What Am I looking For? Identify & Describe: What were the key causes of the civil war? Explain: Which key events were the fault of Charles I or Parliament? Analyse: How far was Charles I responsible for starting the English Civil War? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort - Causes of the English Civil War Chronology Exercise
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Card Sort - Causes of the English Civil War Chronology Exercise

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The great little resources is designed for core and foundation students. It includes 12 key events which were important steps or turning points that led to the English Civil War. Task 1: Sort the cards into the correct chronological order Task 2: Colour code those events which were the fault of either Charles I or Parliament Task 3: Write an extended answer explaining who as to blame for starting the war. Aims & Objectives Theme: Causes of the English Civil War 1642 - 1660 Know: What were the key steps to war? Understand: Which causes were the fault of Charles I or Parliament? Evaluate: Who was to blame for starting the English Civil War? WILF - What Am I looking For? Identify & Describe: What were the key causes of the civil war? Explain: Which key events were the fault of Charles I or Parliament? Analyse: How far was Charles I responsible for starting the English Civil War? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Anti-Semitism - The Nazi attack on the Jews 1918 to 1945
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Anti-Semitism - The Nazi attack on the Jews 1918 to 1945

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These resources / unit of work looks at why the Nazi persecution of the Jews became more extreme from 1918 - 1945? The first few chapters look at the status and position of German Jews in 1918 and then moves on to look at the Nazi rise to power and the propaganda, economic, legal, physical attacks on the Jews from 1933 - 1938. Each chapter is designed with revision and summary sections. I have also included some of my Smart Notes with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and summary diagrams to accompany the booklet which you can adapt as you go along. T he next section then looks at the impact of the war on the next stage of the attack on the Jews by looking at the forced segregation and isolation through ghettoes, which was followed by the work of the Einsatgruppen Battalions as the German Army advanced into the USSR. My booklet then asks the question why did the Nazis then decide to move to a 'Final Solution' before moving onto the industrial methods and tactics used to murder the Jews through 'Destruction through work ' and 'special treatment.' The final section or conclusions then explores some of the historical controversy surrounding how far the German people should be blamed for the persecution of the Jews. If I have quoted from a primary or secondary source then full attribution has been given whenever possible. Please note that my resources were written for a British audience so you may want to run them through your US / local spell checker. Some of the key questions or learning outcomes, which these resources explore are listed below: • What impact did the FWW and Treaty of Versailles have on Germany? • How successful was the Weimar Government at bringing economic and political stability to Germany? • What was the status and position of German Jews in 1920? • What impact did the Great Depression have on the support for extremist parties in Weimar Germany? • Why did Hitler become Chancellor of Germany in 1932? • How did Hitler consolidate his power in 1933 – 34? • How did the status and position of Jews change from 1933 – 45? You need to know about: • What rights did German Jews have under the Weimar Constitution? • Why did hatred of the Jews increase from 1919 – 1933? • Why did the Nazis launch a propaganda attack on the Jews? • What impact did the economic attack have on the Jews 1933 – 38? • What impact did the legal attack have on the status and position of Jews living in Germany? • Why did the Nazis launch a physical attack on the Jews in 1938? • What impact did the Second World War have on the Jews in Europe? • Why did the Nazis introduce the Final Solution in 1941? • How did the Nazi regime use industrial methods to persecute the Jews in the Holocaust from 1933 -45?
OCR GCSE History: America  Land of the Free? Hispanic and Native American Civil Rights 1945 - 1975
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OCR GCSE History: America Land of the Free? Hispanic and Native American Civil Rights 1945 - 1975

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This outstanding resource has been tried and tested over a number of years and has played a significant role in helping to improve not only results but also in educating our students by looking at the important issue of Native American and Hispanic Civil Rights. This booklet includes a wide range of revision notes, tasks, activities and assessment for learning that are suitable for the full ability spectrum at GCSE History. It is aimed at helping students studying Native American and Hispanic civil rights as part of the OCR GCSE Modern World History: USA Land of the Free 1945 - 1975. This booklet comes in two sections. The first resource is a study guide which includes revision notes and sources on Native American and Hispanic history from 1945 - 1980. ’ Accompanying each section are a range of interactive activities and tasks from pro and con organisers, Venn diagrams, thinking skills triangles to various mind map activities to help reinforce and check students knowledge and understanding. The second section, is made up of a series of past paper questions from OCR’s GCSE on this topic. Accompanying these questions are student guides on how to answer each type of question as well as a student mark scheme for self / peer assessment. If you do a different exam board, you can easily drop in your own mark schemes into the table format and adapt this resource. The full contents for each section are listen below: 1. Background: Hispanic Americans 1800 – 1945 2. Discrimination against Hispanic Americans 3. The struggle for equal rights 4. How did the Chicano movement develop in the 1960s? 5. What methods did Hispanic Americans use? 6. The struggle for education 7. The struggle for land grants 8. The struggle for struggle in the fields 9. Crusade for Justice 10. Problems faced by Native Americans 1485 – 1945 11. Position & Status of Native Americans in 1970 12. Why did Native Americans begin to protest? 13. Why did some Native Americans turn to radical protest methods? 14. Revision Activities 15. OCR Style Exam Questions 16. Pupil Mark Schemes I’ve also included my Smart Notes to accompany teaching this unit with aims, objectives, learning outcomes and bank thinking skills templates as an extra bonus. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop or stay in touch via: I’ve also produced some similar paid resources on civil rights issues surrounding McCarthyism, Black and Women’s Civil rights in the same period. Please check them out if you teach or study OCR GCSE America the land of the free? Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Anti- Semitism: Nazi Persecution of the Jews 1918 - 1945
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Anti- Semitism: Nazi Persecution of the Jews 1918 - 1945

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These resources / unit of work looks at why the Nazi persecution of the Jews became more extreme from 1918 - 1945? The first few chapters look at the status and position of German Jews in 1918 and then moves on to look at the Nazi rise to power and the propaganda, economic, legal, physical attacks on the Jews from 1933 - 1938. Each chapter is designed with revision and summary sections. I have also included my smart notes with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and summary diagrams to accompany the booklet which you can adapt as you go along. The next section then looks at the impact of the war on the next stage of the attack on the Jews by looking at the forced segregation and isolation through ghettoes, which was followed by the work of the Einsatgruppen Battalions as the German Army advanced into the USSR. My booklet then asks the question why did the Nazis then decide to move to a 'Final Solution' before moving onto the industrial methods and tactics used to murder the Jews through 'Destruction through work ' and 'special treatment.' The final section or conclusions then explores some of the historical controversy surrounding how far the German people should be blamed for the persecution of the Jews. If I have quoted from a primary or secondary source then full attribution has been given whenever possible. Some of the key questions or learning outcomes, which these resources explore are listed below: • What impact did the FWW and Treaty of Versailles have on Germany? • How successful was the Weimar Government at bringing economic and political stability to Germany? • What was the status and position of German Jews in 1920? • What impact did the Great Depression have on the support for extremist parties in Weimar Germany? • Why did Hitler become Chancellor of Germany in 1932? • How did Hitler consolidate his power in 1933 – 34? • How did the status and position of Jews change from 1933 – 45? You need to know about: • What rights did German Jews have under the Weimar Constitution? • Why did hatred of the Jews increase from 1919 – 1933? • Why did the Nazis launch a propaganda attack on the Jews? • What impact did the economic attack have on the Jews 1933 – 38? • What impact did the legal attack have on the status and position of Jews living in Germany? • Why did the Nazis launch a physical attack on the Jews in 1938? • What impact did the Second World War have on the Jews in Europe? • Why did the Nazis introduce the Final Solution in 1941? • How did the Nazi regime use industrial methods to persecute the Jews in the Holocaust from 1933 -45?