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The History Academy

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Card Sort: Ethics - Torture
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Card Sort: Ethics - Torture

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The ethics and morality of torture is a controversial subject which is at the heart of British values. It is proscribed by the Geneva convention and it is illegal to submit evidence to a British court that has been gained through torture. However, the war on terror has placed many of our service men and women in very difficult circumstances where they have had to make decisions which have been questioned by human rights groups. Should the state ever use torture in order to protect the public safety of its citizens against terrorism? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against the use of torture. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. However, this is a topic which should ideally be delivered by a subject specialists and covered by older students at KS4 or KS5. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organise them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen statements that can sorted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Moral philosophy and ethics Know: What is torture and why is outlawed by the Geneva Convention? Understand: What are the arguments for and against using torture? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which is acceptable to use torture? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is torture and why was it outlawed by the Geneva Convention? Explain - the arguments for and against the use of torture? Analyse - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to use torture? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Lord Liverpool: Protesters 1815 - 1821
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Lord Liverpool: Protesters 1815 - 1821

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This lesson has been designed primarily for A Level students studying Lord Liverpool’s ministry, but can also be used at GCSE. This resource focuses on the first half of Lord Liverpool’s ministry, when the government faced huge economic problems caused by the Industrial Revolution, the Corn Laws and the fall out from end of the war with France. When teaching this topic, it is crucial to focus on the price of bread as this later links with Peel’s repeal of the Corn Laws at the height of Chartism when the rest of Europe fell into revolution in 1848. It is also important to focus on how these protesters were controlled or (policed) as this links into other reforms. This lesson looks at Luddism, the Spa field Riots, the March of the Blanketeers, the Pentrich Rising, The Peterloo Massacre, the Cato Street Conspiracy and the Queen Caroline Affair. At the end of each section, there is a separate slide on both the local and national government response to the protesters. It is important to some syllabuses to differentiate between the two. At the bottom of each relevant slide is a continuum for students to evaluate both the threat level posed by the protesters and the government response. At the end of the PowerPoint, I have also included a table for students to use to help summarise what they have learnt, this is particularly useful at GCSE. When you purchase this resources you will be able to download a PowerPoint with 36 slides on Protesters against Lord Liverpool’s government from 1815 - 1821. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, activities, information slides, diagrams, primary and secondary sources to help students evaluate the threat level posed by the protesters and the response of both local and nation government. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives for these resources are as follows: Theme: Protest and Reform 1815 - 1834 Know: Who Protested and why from 1815 - 1821? Understand: How did the government respond to these protesters on a local and national level? Evaluate: How much of a threat did each group of protesters pose? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Significance WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Who protested and why from 1815 - 1821? Explain: How did the government respond on a local and national level? Analyse: How much of a threat did each group of protesters pose? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources in the History Academy TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort - Causes of the English Civil War Chronology Exercise
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Card Sort - Causes of the English Civil War Chronology Exercise

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The great little resources is designed for core and foundation students. It includes 12 key events which were important steps or turning points that led to the English Civil War. Task 1: Sort the cards into the correct chronological order Task 2: Colour code those events which were the fault of either Charles I or Parliament Task 3: Write an extended answer explaining who as to blame for starting the war. Aims & Objectives Theme: Causes of the English Civil War 1642 - 1660 Know: What were the key steps to war? Understand: Which causes were the fault of Charles I or Parliament? Evaluate: Who was to blame for starting the English Civil War? WILF - What Am I looking For? Identify & Describe: What were the key causes of the civil war? Explain: Which key events were the fault of Charles I or Parliament? Analyse: How far was Charles I responsible for starting the English Civil War? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Fox Hunting Debate
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Card Sort: Fox Hunting Debate

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Fox hunting has become for many an emotive issue with the views of the countryside and cities diverging other whether the sport is a cruel or natural past time. This resource aims to help students understand some of the key issues and help then come to a balanced conclusion on the morality of fox hunting. It be used alongside any main stream text book or video clip as a starter, mini plenary or a consolidation exercise. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen statements that can sorted to help summarise the arguments for and against the ban being lifted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Rights and Responsibilities Know: What is Fox hunting and why was it banned? Understand: What are the arguments for and against lifting the ban on Fox hunting? Evaluate: Should the hunting of all animals be banned or is fox hunting a special case? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is Fox hunting and why was it banned? Explain - the arguments for and against lifting the ban on fox hunting? Analyse - If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: What were the pros and cons of the Homestead Act of 1862?
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Card Sort: What were the pros and cons of the Homestead Act of 1862?

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This interactive card sort gets students to sort through a series of statements to help them assess the achievements and limitations of the Homestead Act of 1862. It can be used as either starter or plenary for a lesson on this topic and is a great way to activate the learning an appeal to multiple learning styles. I would recommend getting your students to peer and self assess their answers before sticking them into their books. When you purchase this resource you will receive a single page Microsoft Office Word document, which contains instructions, a learning objective, two heading cards and 16 statements on the Homestead Act of 1862. Once students have cut out the statements and sorted them, they can extend their understanding by then sorting the statements on both sides into their order of importance. I usually use this resource in preparation for an extended answer on ‘how far was the Homestead Act a success?’ It can also be used to stimulate a debate on the topic as well. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Aims and Objectives: Theme: The American West Know: What were the terms of the Homestead Act of 1862? Understand: What were the achievements and limitations of the act? Evaluate: How far was the Homestead Act a success? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What were the terms of the Homestead Act of 1862? Explain: What either the limitations or achievements of the Homestead Act of 1862? Analyse: Come to a balanced judgement on how far the Homestead Act of 1862 was a success? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Why did Prohibition fail?
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Card Sort: Why did Prohibition fail?

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This great little card sort gets students to look at the key reasons why prohibition failed. It can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students engaged, whilst improving their understanding of the topic. The resource includes four headings - corruption, organised crime, lack of support and poor enforcement, as well as 22 statements which students are then asked to sort the cards under. I have always agonised over the heading ‘poor enforcement’ but as with all my resources, it is in Microsoft Word so you can customise it to suit your own students. Theme: Why did prohibition fail? Know: What were the key factors that account for the failure of prohibition? Understand: what role did corruption, organised crime, poor enforcement and lack of support play it ins failure? Evaluate: which factor was the most important in explaining why prohibition failed? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify - what factors led to the failure of prohibition Describe - What factors led to the failure of prohibition Explain - what role did corruption, organised crime, poor enforcement and lack of support play it’s eventual failure? Analyse - what was the most important factor? Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Censorship of the Media?
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Card Sort: Censorship of the Media?

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The issue of censorship continues to be a controversial subject in most democratic societies. Should public morally be protected? Should children be shielded from violence and sexually explicit material? Should the rich and famous be protected by privacy laws? Should the government stop terrorist groups using social media to recruit and spread their ideology? How about freedom of speech or the issue of fake news? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against the use of censorship. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organise them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity or add additional ideas from the class discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen statements that can sorted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Moral philosophy and ethics Know: What is censorship of the media? Understand: What are the arguments for and against censorship of the media? Evaluate: How far should media be censored in a democratic society? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is censorship of the media? Explain - the arguments for and against censorship of the media? Analyse - How far should media be censored in a democratic society? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Ethics Does Prison Work?
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Card Sort: Ethics Does Prison Work?

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This thought provocative resource aims to help students assess whether prison sentences work. This is a controversial subject with people from all sides advocating different solutions from longer sentences to rehabilitate prisoners to alternatives sentences based in the community. This card sort can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students excited, engaged, whilst improving their understanding of this difficult topic. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two headings cards labeled ‘Pros / Advantages’ and ‘Cons / Disadvantages’ as well as sixteen information cards to be sorted. At the end of the document there is an extension question designed to help consolidate the lesson. This is a fully editable document which can be customized if necessary to suit your students. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Crime and Punishment Know: How are people supported in prison? Understand: What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Evaluate: Does prison protect society from crime? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - How are people treated in prison? Explain - What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Analyze - Does prison protect society from crime? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Prohibition
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Prohibition

5 Resources
This bundle includes a series of lessons on Prohibition. The first looks at the origins of the movement, the second on its immediate impact of the USA and the third explores why it failed. Each lesson comes with a worksheet and an accompanying PowerPoint, which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starter, mini plenary and plenary. These resources are pitched at foundation and core students, but the PowerPoints also contain Oxford and Cambridge past paper questions and student mark schemes. For more information, please click on the individual lesson. Kind Regards Roy
Sacco and Vanettti
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Sacco and Vanettti

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This lesson looks at several key issues surrounding the trail of Sacco and Vanzetti and includes a wide range of contemporary and modern sources to help the learner make up their own min. The aims, objectives and differentiated outcomes are: Theme: The Dark side of the Boom Know: Who were Sacco and Vanzetti and what were they accused of? Understand: How fair was their trail? Understand: Why were some Americans afraid of the new immigrants? Evaluate: How tolerant was the USA in the 1920s? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Source Evaluation & judgement What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify / Describe – Who were Sacco & Vanzetti? Explain – How fair was their trial and investigation ? Analyse – begin to form a judgement on how tolerant was US society in the 1920s? There are 6 activities built into the lesson including a snowballing starter, an OCR style source question with a pupil mark scheme, a persuasive speech literacy activity for their defence or prosecution, a Venn dig ram source analysis on contemporary reactions, an evidence review sheet on their innocence or guilt and finally an OCR 6 mark question with a mark scheme on 'why were Sacco and Vanzetti executed.' I have been observed several times with this resource and have had this lesson graded as outstanding. I have also included a persuasive literacy mat to help students phrase their speeches. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
NASUWT: The role of the workplace rep
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NASUWT: The role of the workplace rep

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This specially commissioned CPD video for the Doncaster NASUWT is designed to help colleagues in education understand the role of the NASUWT workplace rep and dispel some of the myths. Whilst producing this video, we have drawn upon the experience of colleagues from across our local area who have worked closely with schools and colleges for many years. If you are interested in getting involved as a school rep or would like to know more, then please get in touch with your local association. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. If you are interested you can download a number of CPD videos via the Doncaster NASUWT YouTube Channel. Kind Regards Roy
Persuasive Speech or Writing Literacy Mat
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Persuasive Speech or Writing Literacy Mat

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This simple literacy mat is designed to help students produce either a persuasive piece of writing or a speech. As you can see from the preview, students are given a series of sentence starters to help them scaffold their answers. This is a tried and tested resource which works brilliantly with students of all abilities. As a history teacher, I used this mat with my students to write formal letters of complain to General Haig about conditions in the trenches or to write a persuasive letter to a Norman Lord recommending why he should replace his Motte and Bailey Castle with a Square Keep. This resource has been so successful that it has been adopted by our English Faculty and spread around both the LEA and our Trust. This is a brilliant resource which works with all ages and abilities. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun with this outstanding resource and stay in touch via social media. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: Why was it difficult to maintain law and order in the American West?
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Diamond 9: Why was it difficult to maintain law and order in the American West?

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This outstanding resource has been designed to provide stretch and challenge for students analysing the key reasons why it was difficult to maintain law and order in the American West. The key theory underpinning this strategy is that when we rank items, either statements, objects or images, we are required to make explicit the over- arching relationships by which we organise our knowledge and connect our learning. It can be used as a starter, plenary, revision or assessment activity. If you are looking for something more suitable for lower and middle ability then please check out my card sort matching exercise on this topic, which can be downloaded from my TES shop. This resource will easily work alongside any main steam textbook or resource on the American West. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors which explain it was difficult to maintain law and order in the American West. The document is provided in Microsoft Word so you can edit the resource if you wish to customise it further by changing any of the key factors that I have included. Once students have cut out the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons to explain why it was difficult to maintain law and order in the American West. Record and explain the reasons for your choices. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their thinking skills as well as their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The American West Know: What were the key reasons why maintaining law & order was difficult? Understand: What roles did social, economic, geographical factors as well as the values and attitudes play of the people at the time, play in making law enforcement difficult? Evaluate: Which was the most important factor? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: what were the main reasons why maintaining law and order was difficult? Explain: What roles did social, economic, geographical, factors as well as the values and attitudes of people at the time, play in making law enforcement difficult? Analyse: Which was the most important factor? Kind Regards Roy
Why did US Government policy towards the Native Americans change 1830 - 1851?
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Why did US Government policy towards the Native Americans change 1830 - 1851?

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This great card sort is designed to get students to understand why the US Government changed its policies towards Native Americans over the period 1834 - 1851. It is suitable for the full range of ability and works alongside with any mainstream text book or video on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download two single page documents, the first includes the card sort activity, the second the answers. In the first stage of the activity, students match the actions of the US Government with their impact or consequences. In the second stage, they can then reorganise them into their chronological order. The end result is a summary is a great revision guide on how the US Government policies changed towards the Native Americans. Once students have stuck the cards into their books, they can then feedback to a class discussion on which key event was the turning point in the attitude of the government towards the Native Americans living on the Great Plains. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: GCSE American West Know: What were the different policies of the US Government towards the Native Americans in the period 1834 - 1851? Understand: What consequences did these policies have on the Native Americans? Evaluate: Which was the most significant? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify & Decribe: US Policies towards the Native Americans 1834 - 1851 Explain: What consequences did these policies have on the Native Americans? Analysis: Which were the most significant? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort Matching: Lawlessness in the the American West
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Card Sort Matching: Lawlessness in the the American West

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This excellent little card sort exercise is designed to help students test their understanding of the different types of crime that people suffered in the American West. It can also be used as a starter or plenary and is suitable for the full spectrum of ability. When you purchase this resources you will receive a single sheet A4 resource with eight heading cards and statements which need to be cut out and matched together. This resource is provided in Microsoft Word so it can be easily customised for your students if necessary. I usually keep a class set of these in envelops for my students to sort, but the instructions on the sheet allow for students to cut them out and stick then into their exercise books. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The American West Know: What different types of crime faced settlers in the West? Understand: Why were some crimes more serious than others? Evaluate: Why do historians disagree about the number of people killed? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What different types of crime faced settlers in the West? Explain: Why were some crimes treated more serious than others? Analyse: Why do historians disagree about the number of people killed in the 'Wild' West? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
SMSC Card Sorts
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SMSC Card Sorts

16 Resources
These excellent resources have bundled together to give you outstanding value. The over a range of social, moral, spiritual and cultural issues that relate to a number of subjects. If you would like to know more then please click on each resource. They are aimed at the fully range of ability. You can cut them out and put them into an envelop for students to sort or you can get them to cut, sort and stick them into their books. Failing that they can create a key or use highlighters and stick the whole sheet into their books. I have also produced an American version of these resources called Moral Philosophy, but this bundle is smaller and the resources included have been especially adapted for US schools. If you would like some further updates, then please follow me on the TES or facebook.
Ethics Card Sort: Media Censorship?
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Ethics Card Sort: Media Censorship?

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Should freedom of information and speech be limited to protect public morality? Should children be shielded from violence and sexually explicit material? Should the rich and famous be protected by privacy laws? Should the government stop terrorist groups using social media to recruit and spread their ideology? How the issue of fake news? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against the use of censorship. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity or add additional ideas from the class discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen statements that can sorted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral philosophy and ethics Know: What is censorship of the media? Understand: What are the arguments for and against censorship of the media? Evaluate: How far should media be censored in a democratic society? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is censorship of the media? Explain - the arguments for and against censorship of the media? Analyze -How far should media be censored in a democratic society? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Torture - Can its use be morally justified?
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Card Sort: Torture - Can its use be morally justified?

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The ethics and morality of torture is a controversial subject which is at the heart of American values. It is proscribed by the Geneva convention and it is illegal to submit evidence to a court that has been gained through torture. However, the war on terror has placed many of our service men and women in very difficult circumstances where they have had to make decisions which have been questioned by human rights groups. Should the state ever use torture in order to protect the public safety of its citizens against terrorism? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against the use of torture. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. However, this is a topic which should ideally be delivered by a subject specialists and covered by older students at KS4 or KS5. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen statements that can sorted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Moral philosophy and ethics Know: What is torture and why is outlawed by the Geneva Convention? Understand: What are the arguments for and against using torture? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which is acceptable to use torture? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is torture and why was it outlawed by the Geneva Convention? Explain - the arguments for and against the use of torture? Analyze - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to use torture? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Maintaining law and order in the American West
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Card Sort: Maintaining law and order in the American West

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This outstanding resource is designed to help students analysing the key reasons why it was difficult to maintain law and order in the American West. It is followed up by a thinking skills review triangle activity to help students decide which factor was the most important. Both activities can be used as a revision exercise, starter or plenary and will work along side any main stream text book or resource on the American West. The first resource entitled ‘Card Sort - Why was law and order a problem in the West?’, includes five headings under which the students can sort the rest of the cards. These are political, social, economic, geographical, values and attitudes. The rest of the resource then includes 11 cards which can be matched to the headings. Once the cards have been sorted, the students should then be able to move onto the review triangle activity. This is best done in pairs or groups, with one person from each group feeding back their results onto the IWB and explaining their choice. The results from the review triangle and the card sort can then be used, along with any of your other classroom resources, as a basis for students writing an essay or extended piece of writing on this topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The American West Know: What were the key reasons why maintaining law & order was difficult? Understand: What roles did social, economic, geographical factors as well as the values and attitudes play of the people at the time, play in making law enforcement difficult? Evaluate: Which was the most important factor? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: what were the main reasons why maintaining law and order was difficult? Explain: What roles did social, economic, geographical, factors as well as the values and attitudes of people at the time, play in making law enforcement difficult? Analyze: Which was the most important factor? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort:  How were the problems of law and order solved in the American West?
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Card Sort: How were the problems of law and order solved in the American West?

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This great little card sort exercise is designed to help students who are studying law and order in the American West. It can be used as a revision activity, starter or plenary on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Office Word document, which contains a lesson objective, instructions and ten key solutions and their matching explanations. Once students have cut out the cards, they match the solution with the explanation of how it helped to maintain law and order. A simple exercise which works effectively with students of all abilities. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Law and order in the American West Know: What solutions were used to solve the problems of law and order in the West? Understand: How did these solutions help to maintain law and order? Evaluate: How successful were these solutions? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and Describe: The solutions that were used to solve the problems of law and order in the West? Explain: How these solutions were supposed to help maintain law and order? Analyse: How successful were these solutions? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy