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The British Museum

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The British Museum holds in trust for the nation and the world a collection of art and antiquities from ancient and living cultures. This collection offers a rich source of inspiration for teachers. Our classroom and visit resources support object-based learning across the curriculum and are designed to meet the varied needs of students from EYFS through to Key Stage 5.

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The British Museum holds in trust for the nation and the world a collection of art and antiquities from ancient and living cultures. This collection offers a rich source of inspiration for teachers. Our classroom and visit resources support object-based learning across the curriculum and are designed to meet the varied needs of students from EYFS through to Key Stage 5.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - Ancient Egyptian Feast
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Ancient Egyptian Feast

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This fragment of a painting from the tomb of an ancient Egyptian official depicts a lavish feast with music and dancing as entertainment. Its exuberance captures the Egyptians' love of life and enjoyment of each other's company. The painting provides a vivid insight into ancient Egyptians as people and forms a good starting point for enquiries into the lives and status of women. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - Early Chinese writing
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Early Chinese writing

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This object is called an oracle-bone. From the late Shang period in China, oracle-bones, in this case part of the shoulder blade of an ox, were used for finding out about the future. The writing scratched on these bones is the earliest form of Chinese characters. The object provides an insight into a particular use of writing and the interests and concerns of the rulers of early China. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - A Roman Mystery Square
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - A Roman Mystery Square

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This fragment of a word square could be the earliest piece of evidence for the practice of Christianity in northern Britain. The word square itself is a clever and pleasing play on words and may include a number of Christian phrases and symbols. The object offers opportunities to explore Roman writing and the spread of the Latin language, as well as the treatment of the early Christians. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - Roman game board
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Roman game board

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All cultures have developed games to be played during leisure periods. The Romans are best known for their large-scale entertainments, but they also had simpler ways of passing the time such as board games. Evidence for the same Roman games can be found across the empire. This board, which was found in North Wales, offers a good starting point for finding out about everyday pastimes in Roman Britain. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - Ancient Egyptian Food Production
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Ancient Egyptian Food Production

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Models like this were placed in the tombs of wealthy individuals to provide them with a supply of food and drink in the afterlife. This example shows the production of beer, one of the Egyptian dietary basics, and a butcher preparing beef, a luxury food. Such models provide a wealth of detail about the ancient Egyptian diet and the ways in which foodstuffs were produced and prepared. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - Iron Age horse trappings
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Iron Age horse trappings

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Metal horse trappings, often inlaid with glass enamel, are not uncommon archaeological finds and can be found in many museums. They indicate the high esteem given to horses and horse-drawn vehicles in Iron Age Britain, enhancing the social status of the horse-owner. These objects and a unique burial of a woman from East Yorkshire provide the chance to learn about the values of the social elite of Iron Age Britain and the evidence provided by graves. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - Ancient Egyptian writing equipment
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Ancient Egyptian writing equipment

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Writing palettes like this example from the tomb of an Egyptian official were the essential tools of a scribe’s trade. As symbols of literacy, they marked their owners out as members of Egypt’s social and political elite. They can also be used to provide important information about ancient Egyptian writing materials and techniques and shed light on how Egypt was governed. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects -Tombstone of a Roman cavalryman
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Teaching History with 100 Objects -Tombstone of a Roman cavalryman

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The soldier shown on this tombstone came from the region of the present-day Netherlands and belonged to an auxiliary cavalry regiment stationed at Corinium in the west of England. The tombstone offers a good starting point from which to explore the Roman army, the cultural diversity of the Roman army in Britain and the value of tombstones and their inscriptions for finding out about Roman Britain. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
The Tudors
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The Tudors

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Find out about the three generations of Tudors who had such a dramatic impact on the English throne. Use this image bank to introduce your students to the Tudor monarchs.
Teaching History with 100 Objects -The Oba of Benin
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Teaching History with 100 Objects -The Oba of Benin

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This brass plaque dating from the sixteenth century was seized by British troops from the palace of the Oba (king) of Benin along with many other exquisite items made of brass, bronze, ivory, coral and wood. It shows the Oba surrounded by his attendants and provides an opportunity both to explore the importance and status of the Oba and the wealth and sophistication of the culture of Benin. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Discover the Arab World
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Discover the Arab World

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Use the rich collection of the British Museum to explore key themes about Arab people and culture: achievement, art, conflict, diversity, gender and global interaction. Supports teaching about the region at KS3/4 in art and design, history, citizenship and religious education. Includes an image bank plus a booklet and additional teachers' notes.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - A Greek theatre mask
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - A Greek theatre mask

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This terracotta model of a theatre mask is an example of the sort of evidence we have to use to find out about ancient Greek drama. Theatre is one of the most famous and most important legacies of ancient Greece to western culture, but ancient theatre performances and the context in which they took place were very different from what we experience today. The mask leads naturally into the exploration of costume, plays and theatres and should also prompt discussion of why theatre was important to the Greeks. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.