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The British Museum

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The British Museum holds in trust for the nation and the world a collection of art and antiquities from ancient and living cultures. This collection offers a rich source of inspiration for teachers. Our classroom and visit resources support object-based learning across the curriculum and are designed to meet the varied needs of students from EYFS through to Key Stage 5.

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The British Museum holds in trust for the nation and the world a collection of art and antiquities from ancient and living cultures. This collection offers a rich source of inspiration for teachers. Our classroom and visit resources support object-based learning across the curriculum and are designed to meet the varied needs of students from EYFS through to Key Stage 5.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - Britain's Bayeux Tapestry
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Britain's Bayeux Tapestry

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The original Bayeux tapestry is a 70-metre strip of embroidered linen made in the AD 1070s. It tells a version of the events of AD 1064 - 66, including the death of Edward the Confessor and the Battle of Hastings. This faithful replica of the tapestry was made by 35 skilled women embroiderers so that Britain would have its own copy of the tapestry. It allows exploration of the events that led up to the Norman conquest of England in AD 1066 and provides an opportunity to examine evidence in historical sources. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects -The first passenger locomotive
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Teaching History with 100 Objects -The first passenger locomotive

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Built by Robert Stephenson and Company, Locomotion No.1 was the first steam locomotive to pull a purpose-built passenger carriage. It ran on the opening day of the Stockton and Darlington Railway in 1825. The Stockton and Darlington Railway was the first steam hauled, public passenger railway in the world. This achievement of nineteenth century engineering provides a good starting point for examining the subsequent rapid adoption of railways and the impact of passenger rail travel on Victorian Britain. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
How were mummies made?
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How were mummies made?

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Follow the Egyptian mummification process step by step. This resource helps students understand the process of mummification and encourages them to consider a range of resources in their enquiries.
Bronze Age Britain
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Bronze Age Britain

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Around 2500 BC a new culture arrived in Britain via cross-channel connections with mainland Europe. Bronze gradually replaced stone as the main material for tools and by 2000 BC the period known as the Early Bronze Age had begun. Use the high quality images in our image bank to give your students an introduction to Bronze Age Britain through real objects from the time.
Discover the Arab World
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Discover the Arab World

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Use the rich collection of the British Museum to explore key themes about Arab people and culture: achievement, art, conflict, diversity, gender and global interaction. Supports teaching about the region at KS3/4 in art and design, history, citizenship and religious education. Includes an image bank plus a booklet and additional teachers' notes.
Art guide: the natural world
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Art guide: the natural world

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Throughout history artists have drawn inspiration from and represented the world around them. This shows itself in images of plants, animals and landscape. The objects in the British Museum offer a vast range of resources that students can explore in relation to the natural world. This teacher guide offers ideas to get you started thinking about how the Museum can support work in this area.
The art of Benin
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The art of Benin

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Uncover the famous bronzes from the royal palace in Benin – a glimpse of a thriving ancient civilisation. Includes information on the bronze plaques and a scheme of work.
Sutton Hoo
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Sutton Hoo

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Examine some of the beautiful objects found in this famous ship burial, and see what the excavation site looked like. Includes jewellery, coins, helmets and more.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - Fire bucket from the Great Fire of London
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Fire bucket from the Great Fire of London

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This bucket was found in 1974 during archaeological excavations near where the Great Fire of London began. It offers a way to explore how the fire was fought, how the approach used in 1666 differed from our modern-day fire service, and what this tells us about city life then and now. It is a familiar domestic object, but made of leather and personalised with initials, allowing consideration of possible owners, their experience of the fire and how the bucket came to be in the cellar. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Art guide: textiles
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Art guide: textiles

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Explore the different ways textiles are made and used across the world: for ceremonies and status, protection, display, clothing and decorating a home.
Greek Women
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Greek Women

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What was life like for women in ancient Greece? This resource uses objects to examine the roles women played in ancient Greece from weaving to ritual ceremonies.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - The State Entry into Delhi
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - The State Entry into Delhi

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This painting by the British artist Roderick MacKenzie (1865 - 1941) sits in a heavy frame inscribed with verses from the Qur'an in Arabic script. This is the second version of the painting. The original commission is in the Victoria Memorial Hall - now a museum - in Kolkata. It shows the Delhi Durbar of 1903, a dazzling state occasion to mark the declaration of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra as Emperor and Empress of India. Painted from a British perspective, it portrays the dominance of Britain over India. However, this image of British supremacy masks the realities and the often fragile nature of British power at a time when events elsewhere, such as the Boer war, prompted questions about the purpose and nature of British imperial rule. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects -  Aircraft Factory Works Pass
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Aircraft Factory Works Pass

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Thelma Barlow worked at the Parnall Aircraft factory in Yate, which made aircraft parts. On 27 February 1941 the factory was bombed by the Luftwaffe. Many people died in the raid. Thelma Barlow survived, but this charred works pass was all that was left of her personal belongings. The pass can be used to initiate or develop study of the impact of World War II on life in Britain in terms of the experience of the war and changes in the role of women. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects - Eye of Horus Amulet
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Teaching History with 100 Objects - Eye of Horus Amulet

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Produced in their thousands in temple workshops, amulets such as this Eye of Horus were cheap and readily available and were routinely worn by the living as well as being placed with the bodies of the dead. The Eye of Horus was one of the most popular amulets, and a symbol of healing and medicine. Everyday religious items like this amulet shed light on the beliefs and worship of people in ancient Egypt as well as offering a starting point for looking at Egyptian gods more generally. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects -Photograph of Amy Barbour-James
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Teaching History with 100 Objects -Photograph of Amy Barbour-James

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This photograph from around 1907 shows Amy Barbour-James as a little girl. Her father John, born in British Guiana (present-day Guyana) campaigned for the rights of the British black community and Amy continued this work. She died in 1988. The family's history, in two British imperial territories as well as in London, offers insights into the changing experiences of black people within the British Empire and their struggle for recognition and equality in colonial Britain. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
Teaching History with 100 Objects -Roman gladiators vase
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Teaching History with 100 Objects -Roman gladiators vase

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This vase was made in Colchester from clay obtained locally. It shows different forms of gladiator combat. These scenes provide direct evidence for types of gladiator as well as acting as a starting point for study of other aspects of this form of public entertainment. Such a distinctively Roman object, made and found in a distant province, raises the issue of how Romanised the people of the empire became. Part of the Teaching History with 100 Objects collection from The British Museum.
The human form: power and devotion
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The human form: power and devotion

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The British Museum’s potential for exploring the human form in world art is unsurpassed. Each of these three presentations for use in the classroom deals with two different aspects of the Human Form. They also provide valuable resources for investigating, form and medium.